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Thread: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

  1. #2346
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    So, back to my own personal paradise. The shipyard in Mystic.

    While I was away, the Conrad's life boat was brought into the paint shop for work. We did the other boat a few years ago. This time it's the paid staff doing the work.



    This side has the paint stripper on it.



    The fork lift is still in the shop. It runs now but is getting a make over.





    Some work is still going on with the "Livery Boat."






  2. #2347
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Wayne and I had a small job. The LA Dunton has a cook stove in the fo'c'sle and the stack has seen better days.



    So, off we went to the hardware store to buy replacement pipe.

    We went with the galvanized pipe. But now it needs paint.



    Most of LA Dunton's varnished wood is being redone inside, so we'll get to installing it next week.

    Roger was working in the Tango. The pedal mechanism has corroded badly so he took it out for rework.





    The bottom corroded off.



    On Mayflower II, Walt is chipping away at the upper part of the hull.

    It seems like the lower parts are pretty much done except for planking.



    Most of the guys appear to be working farther up. The scaffolding is just over Walt's head.

  3. #2348
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1



    I just climbed up and took pictures of the guys at work.











  4. #2349
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1





    Another upper level futtock?





    It was a really nice day at the seaport. It was almost 60 degrees.

    Of course last week was in the 80's.



    Never mind, I still love it.


  5. #2350
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    March 1, 2018

    I went to the seaport on Thursday this week because it was time for the First Thursday Lecture. It's always interesting but when Paul is the one giving the lecture we make an extra effort to hear it.

    The talk was about the guano trade. Paul even had a shirt for the event.

    He said he could give the whole talk about the content of this painting. By looking at the detail you can learn a lot about the guano trade.

    I'm not going to write about the whole lecture, just a few highlights. (Or, more than you really want to know about guano.)



    The counties involved ashore can be identified by the flags ashore. (USA, England, others)
    The counties involved in shipping can be determined by the flags on the ships. (Mostly USA, but also others.)
    The cheap labor it took to mine the guano. (Chinese are identifiable with their traditional straw hats)
    The methods of mining and loading the guano ships at anchor.
    The amount of guano on the island. (Above the Chinese laborers the mined areas are visible. 10,000,000 tons were mined and shipped) That's a lot of guano!
    The politics involved.

    The painting has no date. He was able to tell it was painted about 1867 by one of the flags on the island. The country only used the flag for about one year and that was 1867. Which one? I don't recall. I wasn't taking notes.

    He was able to tie in the Franco Prussian war to the guano trade.

    All these talks are taped but the seaport has no way for you to listen to them. That is really sad.

    At last month's talk, Christopher Gasiorek, Vice President for Watercraft Preservation and Programs gave a talk about his life as an officer on merchant vessels. He told of the really long ship he on was while going up a river. (Mississippi?) In a bend in the river he could see the bow bend a good six feet because of the cross current! After the turn it straightened out again.

    These talks are always worth going to.

    So, enough talk. Time to accomplish something.

    Last week Wayne and I bought stove pipe for LA Dunton's fo'c'sle cook stove. This small job has turned sour. I have other words however guano comes to mind. We press on.

    Here's where we started.



    My own fault. Last week I did not have a tape measure. I made a educated guess that we needed an 8" pipe coming off the top of the stove and then it necked down to 6". Long story short, the top of the stove is 7". Well this required a 7" to 6" reducer. They didn't have one at the hardware store, and they did not sell 7" pipe. The 7" reducer they did have reduced to 5". So out of pocket I bought 5" pipe and elbows.

    Well, they still don't sell 7" pipe. So off to Groton where another store had it in stock. They also had a 7" to 6" reducer. So now I don't need all the other 5" pipe I bought at the first store. I can return it next week, but jeez!

    So by quitting time this is as far as we got.



    On to the next problem. I forgot the key for the drill chuck so I couldn't drill a pilot hole. The screws alone worked OK on the outer pipe, but wouldn't go through the inner pipe at the joint. No support on the inner metal.

    Grrrr.

    The stove itself is a problem. I believe it's made with a very poor quality of cast iron. Pieces are falling off. This is the same kind and model of stove as on the Morgan. The Morgan stove was in tough shape but I was able to put it into usable condition. When Dunton is restored I'm pretty sure we can do it again, but for now.......

    The 7" pipe won't stay put.

    The lip in the lower left is gone.



    By this time it was past 3:30 quitting time. Next week will be better.



    Today we in New England are having a Nor'easter. Winds of hurricane velocities are predicted.

    The seaport always prepares for these storms by battening down the hatches, as it were.

    Here they are strapping down the covers that keep the lumber dry.



    Short report this week. We were so busy getting nothing accomplished I took very few pictures.



    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #2351
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    March 6, 2018

    Wayne couldn't make it today and Anne was also off, so I worked alone for the most part.

    I went back into the LA Dunton to finish off the smoke stack. The grind continued. Over the week, the screws I bought to hold it together took a walk. So, back to the hardware store to get new screws. The good part was I was able to return the pipe I couldn't use from last week.

    So here it is, as done as it's going to be. Visually it's OK, but if a fire was going inside and the boat was going off shore, a much better installation would be needed. I didn't bother with a damper. It would only be for show and very few people would notice it was missing.

    This is just after I touched up the paint.



    In the machine shop, Gary is getting ready to paint the Clark forklift with a finish coat of paint.





    Air filtration.





    The final color is original.



    The color? Well lets just say the Pebble Beach Conours is not in its future.


  7. #2352
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    When done with the stove I helped get the whale boat bottoms ready for this season. The seaport uses a white bottom paint. When off shore whaling, these boats only spent a short time in the water so the critters never had a chance to mess up the bottom.



    The port side is done so I worked on the starboard side.



    It's easy when the bottom side is up.



    I took time at the end of the day to check Mayflower II's progress.

    When the steam box is open, a steamed plank must have just come out.



    I got there just in time.

    A little hard to make out, but that's the end going in.



    You can see it's still steaming here.






  8. #2353
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    It takes the whole team to carry one of these in and install it.





    It's important to have the planks tight against each other so a hole is drilled into a futtock and a steel bar is inserted. The wedge then is driven in to hold it tight.



    On the other side, Trevor is mounting a clamp that will hold tomorrow's plank. It's threaded right into the stem.



    All these holes used for clamping will be filled with dowels later so there are no voids inside.

    Inside, another futtock goes in.



    Outside again out on the upper port side an older futtock receives a Dutchman.



  9. #2354
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    The deck planking is on location now for the aft end.



    In the bow, the guys were hauling up another futtock.









    I'm not sure where it went. By the time I got down, the guys and the futtock had disappeared inside.

    The bow.



  10. #2355
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    March 15, 2018

    Well, finally after several weeks of hard work, the Clark fork lift has a new engine, wiring, exhaust system and paint.

    I used to know a Clark back in Jr high school. I wonder what ever happened to him.



    I suggested flames and pin striping, but that fell on deaf ears.

    Nate is putting together the Norfolk Navy Yard engine. He made rings out of a cast iron bar. Here he is checking the gap. It's important to have some space between the two ends of a ring. Too tight and with heat it would expand and bind up.

    The top of a piston is usually used to set the ring in place squarely in the cylinder but these pistons can't be used due to their design. So he made a T shaped tool to push the ring down evenly.







    Next up, it will go on a piston.



    He already has the piston in place on the left cylinder. The one his hand is on will get done next week.

    We had our third nor'easter in March on Tuesday. Nate said he got 16" of snow. Looks like we may get another one next Tuesday.

    But in the mean time, Spring is coming. Promise!


    There are signs of it.




  11. #2356
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Wayne and I started to clean up the left over snow in the yard and docks.





    The snow is melting quickly.





    Our second job was to get the Garvey ready. The boat needed new zincs and the steel rudder needed to be prepped for paint.

    Wayne is using a carbide paint scraper to get off the loose rust.



    I got to talking with a visitor about the garvey. He is local, but had family in from Canada. I told him about the new aluminum Garvey being built in the pole barn. So I took him in to see it. I suggested he might like to volunteer. We'll see.



    Zell is showing him the single lever throttle/shifter that will be used. Zell has been assembling the controls over the last couple of weeks.

  12. #2357
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1



    The boat was getting painted as I was putting on the zincs.



    It was a cold day with the wind so once I was done I went home.

    On the way out I found Susan putting on yet another coat of varnish.



    I'm hoping that warmer weather will open up more interesting things for us to play with.

    Next week should be fun, the Clydesdales are coming.

    https://www.mysticseaport.org/event/...ystic-seaport/

  13. #2358
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    March 24, 2018

    We had a never ending series of nor'easters this month. There have been four of them.
    For me, they turned out to be nothing much at all. I never shoveled once. Others not too far way got hit badly. A lot of towns had power out all over. If there is one good thing about them, they melt away quickly.

    So because of the storms, we went to the seaport on Friday.

    Nate is to a point where he is running in the Norfolk engine. By way of a local library he was able to borrow an original manual on this engine. In it, they said to run it in this way for eight hours before attempting to start it. So, here he's rigging the same motor he used on the Atlas and Wolverine engines.



    Later in the day he had it all set. Not that you can see that it's running here.



    It runs very slowly. Very, very slowly.

    Quickly get bored watching it slowly.



    See you in eight hours, Nate.

    Wayne and I repaired docks. The rubber parts that prevent falling between the docks were loose so we reattached them. Then we drove nails back in to prevent more tripping.



    Yeah, I know, I'm getting tired of this too.

    But once in a while there is a bright spot.

    Mystic Seaport hosted the Budweiser Clydesdales to be in the annual St Patrick's Day parade.



  14. #2359
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    ​What beautiful animals! From the Budweiser website.

    The Budweiser Clydesdales made their first-ever appearance on April 7, 1933. A gift from August A. Busch, Jr. and Adolphus Busch to their father in celebration of the repeal of Prohibition, the presentation of the original two six-horse hitches of champion Clydesdales moved father, sons and drivers to tears. The phrase “crying in your beer” was officially coined shortly thereafter.

    This may not work because you need to tell them you are of age to see it. But try it.

    http://www.budweiser.com/en/clydesdales.html

    Wayne and I walked to the tent where they were stabled.





    These are big boys. They are mostly 18 hands. That's 4" per hand, times 18 = 6 feet at the top of the shoulder. They weigh about a ton, give or take.



    The dogs are enjoying a heat lamp.



    The horses are walked frequently.



    That's Wayne in the rear canter trying to keep up.

    They travel in style. Anne is directing traffic.



    A friend in school 50 odd years ago said he rode a Clydesdale once. He said it was like riding a block of concrete.


  15. #2360
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    On Saturday the seaport held a special introduction for people who have donated to the seaport over the past year. Coffee and donuts, fruits and juices were provided.



    The Budweiser rep talked all about the horses and everything else.



    They are on the road 300 days a year.


    Next we went into the tent and more was told about the horses.





    Then was a photo op.



    Barbara was there too.



    At 10:00 the tent was opened to seaport visitors.




  16. #2361
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    At 2:00 they team was harnessed and driven around the seaport grounds.

    This is the underside of the wagon. This is the original part. It's a 1905 Studebaker.



    On the back is a not so original set of brakes.



    Can you see it? Look below for the disc brakes.



    The first horse.





    The biggest two horses go right in front of the wagon and they do most of the work.



    The smallest horses are in front. That is if there is anything small about a Clydesdale horse.

  17. #2362
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Number two. The tails are bobbed so they don't get tangled in the reins.






    Steve White, Mystic Seaport President.


    That makes four.



    Number eight.



    I ran ahead to get a good shot of them under way.




  18. #2363
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Then I ran over to the Morgan thinking they would come down on the waterfront, but they turned in front of Spouter Tavern and stopped.



    They loaded and then unloaded several cases of beer. Photo op?











    They did finally drive down down the waterfront, but it was cold, I was tired, and I left early. So that part I missed.





    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    I saw the Bud Clydesdale Hitch a handful of years ago in Buzzards Bay, MA. near the Cape Cod Canal lift bridge. They sure are beautiful to see in person and I have a nice photo of the team framed at my Dad's house right behind his bar. That was a fun weekend with them in town for a visit.

  20. #2365
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    March 29, 2018

    We spent the day at hard labor on Thursday this week with the camera securely locked up in the car. Well, there wasn't much to see anyway. We were just cleaning up.

    Later that day, I met a father pushing a stroller. His little girl had on a hood with a a "horn?" on top. I asked him if was a unicorn. He replied. "narwhal".

    Well, of course. At Mystic Seaport, what else would it be?





    It looks a bit like an ice cream cone here, but in person it looks good.

    Mayflower guys get into their work.



    It comes from the plane he's using fairing in the futtocks on Mayflower II.



    Mimicking the plank that will go on later, this piece will show the high spots and the approximate amount of stock that needs to come off.



    Just out of the steam box, another plank goes on in the stern.





  21. #2366
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1



    This is out of order. I was headed to the machine shop when I took this and didn't realize Trevor was waiting for the plank above.



    This is the port side bow.



    Higher up, more futtocks are going in.



    In the original framing for the topsides of Mayflower II there was a single futtock in each frame. To replicate this shape would take a very special piece of wood with shape that would allow a somewhat "S" shape. Cutting it out of a single piece would not be realistic so the guys are continuing the double frame construction all the way to the top.






  22. #2367
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1




    In the barn, another plank.



    From December of 2014, here is the generator on board Mayflower II.



    Here's the new one.




  23. #2368
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    April 3, 2018

    When the old planks come off the hull of Mayflower II, the spikes that were holding them on have such a bond to the futtock the spikes stay firmly attached.

    Nate is using the slide hammer that was used on the Morgan project to pull them out.



    This tool works, but it is really heavy and requires an enormous effort to pull them out.

    A possible better way is to use a pneumatic chisel with a special tool. Instead of pushing, this adapter pulls.



    Here it is shown with a toe pad that came with the kit.



    But that won't work as a nail puller.

    The head off the slide hammer is the same tread size and that will work. A bit of luck.




    After a bit of heat from a torch, it came right off.

    We scouted up an air compressor and dragged it over to Mayflower II. After running the wire and hose, Nate gave it a try.

    I was too busy managing wires, hoses, and myself on the scaffolding so I didn't get any pictures of the failure to launch. My guess is that there is too much spring in the setup and the spike wouldn't budge.

    We have other ideas. More on that later.

    There are two barrels of replacement spikes. There are probably a lot more than this too.



    Scott is working on a new pole caddie. It's used to move large spars around the yard. One end caries the heavy part and a fork lift can carry the other end. Or a couple of shipwrights can lug the lighter end if possible.

    Most likely he'll have some sort of cradle on it.




  24. #2369
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    One of Mayflower II's tops is done so here it's getting lifted out of the paint shop.



    Then the Conrad lifeboat is rolled over and put back in the paint shop so the inside can be cleaned up. We did the sister boat a few years ago and it took all winter. This time this boat is getting just a touch up.



    The rest of the morning Anne and I cleaned the New Haven Sharpie masts. The boat is in storage in the Rossie Mill building, but the masts are to be used again to hold a large banner on the side of the Mayflower II's shelter.



    It was a dark and raw day and not a good day for the following pictures. The top of the foremast was going up, but mostly all I got was.....well...







    It had just started to rain as I walked by and the last time I looked, the were down and the mast was not up.

    There's always another day.


  25. #2370
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    April 11, 2018

    Last week the spikes holding the planking on the Mayflower II's hull were giving fits. With a large effort, a slide hammer was able to get them out, but the effort was back breaking. So during the week, Nate and I tried to come up with an easier way.

    Here are the spikes we're trying to get out.



    I found this. It's rated for 14 tons. But in order to use it I would have to modify it by milling a slot down the center of the flange. This isn't a bad thing, but it only will lift a small height. Nate had to hammer the spike last week all the way out. They are really tight the whole way.



    So we were going to try it anyway except the coupling fitting was wrong. So we went to a local hydraulics dealer who gave us the correct fitting.

    But.....

    He clamped in the vise and marked up the out side.

    Well, there goes returning it.

    Anyway, in the meantime we found that a ram that came with the Enerpack had a two inch travel so Nate made it work with a tube and welded piece that made it a toe lift.



    It's not well presented here, but you can see the slot the toe that the spike fits into.



    This is not a very clear picture, but you can see it needs a footing so it doesn't tip towards the spike and bend it.



    So I went back to my project for the day cleaning up trash, (No pictures of that.) and Nate made a foot for the rig.

    By the time I got back, he had made a foot and pulled a spike with relative ease.

    Turns out it's not a spike at all.

    It's a carriage bolt!



    Hey, it worked, but looks
    to me like it was done by the lowest bidder.


  26. #2371
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Elsewhere on Mayflower II, The bottom planking is climbing higher. It was a rainy day so I didn't hang around to see the next plank go it, but the streamer was cooking all afternoon.



    Up in the bow another futtock is ready to go in.

    This is an amazing piece. Tapered, twisted, angled, diamond shaped on the lower end and square on the top. The shape is all done with a smooth transition from one end to the other.



    Pictures don't do it justice.



    This is another one being lifted into place. But this one is much simpler, (At least to my simple eye) because it's installed farther back from the bow. It doesn't have quite the same complications of the other's shape. He's using a chain fall to lift it. The chain fall is attached to eye screwed into the face.





    I have no idea what this is about. He appears to be attaching a tapered block to the side of a futtock using two trunnels.



    Perhaps it a sort of Dutchman.



  27. #2372
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Anne spent most of the day finishing up the New Haven Sharpie masts. They will be used to display a large Mayflower II banner outside the temporary building where Mayflower II is being restored.



    The Sharpie's are in storage with hundreds of other seaport boats not on display.

    https://www.mysticseaport.org/locations/sharpie/

    I think the yard makes more cubic feet of scrap wood than most people use on their whole boat project.



    But it does not go to waste. It will go across the street behind the parking lot where it will be saved for next winter. Most of the village buildings are heated with a pot belly stove. I know the Mystic Print Shop is warmed this way.

    https://www.mysticseaport.org/locati...inting-office/

    When I took the half hull carving class a few years ago, it was held in the John Gardner Small Boat shed, heated with a pot belly stove.

    Sold out, but it will come again.

    https://www.mysticseaport.org/event/...-construction/

    So as we left the seaport we found this.



    It has something to do with a square rigged model. Some Model!

    If I find out more, stay tuned.....

  28. #2373
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    April 17, 2018

    Anne was off today.

    Wayne and I started off with a little paint job in the paint shop. Conrad's life boat is getting freshened up with new paint.



    Our simple task was to paint some of the floorboards.





    This simple job done, we went on to our next task of cleaning up around the village.

    In the blacksmith's shop we found a Coast Guard group watching a demonstration.





    All were very attentive.




  29. #2374
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1



    This was the first of two Pirate's Days. The attendance seemed light, but the weather was cold and damp so most will probably show up Wednesday. Most of the schools in the area are off for spring break.



    While the air was supposed to be warmer, the wind was right off the water. Ugh!

    Pirates did show up though.

    This one had warm coffee and an umbrella.







    This is an old Marx Toys mechanical parrot. I've had it for fifty plus years. I figured it would add to the charm of pirates in the galley.



    Its head swivels, its wings flap, its beak moves, the eyes light up, and it talks! Push a button and it starts to move and play what you recorded on it. It was never a great recording, but after fifty years, it's not nearly as good anymore.

    Oh well, neither am I.


  30. #2375
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Some pirates are fiercer looking than others.











  31. #2376
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    April 24, 2018

    This has been one of Nate's winter projects. However all the other projects got in the way at times. But now he's to a point where he can mount the distributor on the Norfolk Navy Yard engine. It's a four cylinder distributor, but he only needs two. I think he said he has a special cap coming with only two high tension wires. Originally it probably had a magneto and someone replaced it with this get up later on.

    There are no cylinder heads with it, so Scott and Nate have made some. For now, the heads will be temporary because they haven't made any way to cool them. It should be OK for short runs and no load.


    As of yesterday, Nate said he thinks Scott has found another engine that may be able to supply the missing parts. More on that later, I hope.






    Wayne and I spent a beautiful morning painting a whale boat bottom. This is one of the whale boats that came from various yards and schools for use during the 38th Voyage. This one came from Australia.



    This boat, according to shipyard scuttlebutt, will be going to china.

    ____


    The highlight of the day was the haul out of the Viking ship Draken Harald Hårfagre.

    As of now, she will be with us until just after the Wooden Boat show and then will be off to raid and pillage. Well, not really.

    I over heard that the new crew will get a training on a run over to Greenport on Long Island.

    https://www.drakenhh.com/east-coast-tour-2018/

    But for now, she was hauled for routine maintenance.











  32. #2377
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Orange ct
    Posts
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1



    I never noticed the details on this boat before.

    Beautiful.

    Every board ended with the same detail.





    Short straw here.



    Tough to come out smelling like a rose.



    With the exception of the props, Ragnar would have been pleased with her lines.






  33. #2378
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    11,401

    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Well done! Thank you!
    Jay

  34. #2379
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Orange ct
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1





    Just about this time, the next Mayflower II bottom plank was ready to come out of the steam box.







    It needs to butt up hard against the end of the plank alongside on the other end.




  35. #2380
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Orange ct
    Posts
    1,963

    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Wedges help to make the twist.



    On the starboard side, towards the back, Jamie is drilling a hole to fasten a futtock.







    Anne takes a break.







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