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Thread: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

  1. #1
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    Default Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    I read a thread on WeldingWeb about an interesting boat. The guy is a sailor, seems to have researched boatbuilding well, and dove right in. He's building in welded aluminum lapstrake, and she's about planked up. I don't know how to post links, but if you go to WeldingWeb and look for posts by Zeyang, I think you'll find it.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Pretty cool!

  3. #3

    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    yeah he's got what it takes, & it appears he's building it mostly alone
    The first J Class Designs for 75 years

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Seems like a neat idea, but I wonder about the economics of all that welding.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    There's a thread on SA cruising as well.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Always wondered if that was doable.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Seems he's been thorough and careful so far. I wish him well.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Do you do the welding from the inside or the outside?

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    This looks like an extreme of multi-chine construction. It does seem the total length of the welded seams reaches extremes--a significant drawback to the technique. I've seen single-chine derivatives of similar hulls what work quite well. I'm thinking that the welding rod alone would be a significant percentage of the material cost.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    yes Terry, can you give us an estimate of what it might cost, even just the hull plate & rods
    The first J Class Designs for 75 years

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Wonder if you could rivet and glue--they make Jaguars that way these days.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    I'm not sure he's in China. His weldingweb info gives that as his location, and he uses a Chinese name and references. But he's a blue eyed white European, and his plan is to sail the boat to China.
    His thread shows pictures of other welded plank boats, hopefully he's getting good advice.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Thanks very much for pointing out this interesting project. I had never considered a lapstrake metal hull and I applaud the builder for thinking 'out of the box' and wish the project much success.

    Personally, my dream for uncommon metal construction is orgiami/strongall.
    No frames initially, the stiffness is in the compound curved shape developed from a flat plate (darned quickly!!!).
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/origamiboats/
    http://www.anchoryachts.com/strongyachts_strongall.php
    http://www.metalboatbuilding.org/php....php?f=38&t=49




    Last edited by George Ray; 12-07-2009 at 09:05 AM.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    I didn't check but is he using GTAW(TIG) or SMAW(Stick) welding?

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    AH!...didn't think about MIG...we don't use it so it slipped my mind. If he goes cold the penetration won't be sufficient unless he backwelds it. Alum only has a 60% strength factor at the welds...hope he is using lots of filler wire and a good build up for his fillets.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    That origami looks like a Swain. He's the only guy I ever met built a boat faster than me. Rented a spot in a boatyard and launched a 32 ' er 1 month later (easy street). Took 3 months to build my34'strip woody.

  17. #17

    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    thank you Terry for working this out
    The first J Class Designs for 75 years

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    In Bridgeport, Ct., there's a huge unfinished metal sailboat. Heading east on I-95, if you look south you can see it. I believe it's on the property of the local shipbuilding company. It's been there for years. The thing has got to be close to 100' long. Anyone know what it is?

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Jones View Post
    In Bridgeport, Ct., there's a huge unfinished metal sailboat. Heading east on I-95, if you look south you can see it. I believe it's on the property of the local shipbuilding company. It's been there for years. The thing has got to be close to 100' long. Anyone know what it is?
    It was started for the TYCO guy (who is still in jail?).

    Nice Frers design, 150' LOA....

    The interior joinery was almost all complete, boxed up in a few containers I believe...

    http://www.sparkmanstephens.com/yach...8641&curr_id=7

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    The professional sign-makers no longer use MDO but a hybrid class of MDO with a aluminium outer shealth bonded to the inner plywood. I have always considered that a lapstrake build could use this technique for at least the first few strakes in buiding a Oughtred type lap-stake build. It's still plywood to bond with epoxy but the outer veneer is a aluminium coating ply. WHY THE NOT. You would get the best of both techques. I would have gone for it if I had known of such a technique. Its expensive. Yea @ I'm quessing now, but I think he said 350$ a sheet. But what a bottom hull. Any thoughts?????

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    The steel boat shown above is a Brent Swain design. I built one.
    30 feet or 36 feet. Probably 36. Each plate is about 2,440lbs. 3/16 inch thick.
    I also helped to build two other 36 foot Brent swain boats.
    There is a CAD CAM steel boat designed by Gary Noble and now many others that are pre cut from pre primed plate. That eliminates a lot of sandblasting later on.
    The absolute best book on the subject overall is STEEL AWAY. Then CRUISING AS A WAY of LIFE by Thomas Colvin. A must read. Best book on Aluminum boats is by KLINGEL.

    The problem with the lapstrake metal boat being built is this:
    A lot of over lapping joints makes noise in the water.
    Lots of welding.
    Also more wetted surface=more drag.
    Corrosion can be much greater than steel.
    Aluminum condensates 3.75 times MORE than steel.
    To foam or insulate the aluminum is more expensive for the foam, because it must have a special coating first.
    If it is the newer aluminum for hulls (5356) or newer it will help as far as the corrosion rate.
    Cost is much higher to build the hull.
    My boat fantasy below: "Luckystar"
    Last edited by donald branscom; 12-07-2009 at 07:43 PM. Reason: add photo
    I love the smell of fresh cut plywood in the morning.

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Quote Originally Posted by adam96 View Post
    It was started for the TYCO guy (who is still in jail?).

    Nice Frers design, 150' LOA....

    The interior joinery was almost all complete, boxed up in a few containers I believe...

    http://www.sparkmanstephens.com/yach...8641&curr_id=7
    I looked it up and anyone out there looking for a bargain, the ship yard will finish it for a mere $25 million. 150' aluminum sloop. Unbelievable.

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Jones View Post
    I looked it up and anyone out there looking for a bargain, the ship yard will finish it for a mere $25 million. 150' aluminum sloop. Unbelievable.
    For me, the tough part to swallow is the $5 million annual budget to run it. Otherwise, I might get on board.....

    There are no bargains in yachting...

  24. #24
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Quote Originally Posted by donald branscom View Post
    The steel boat shown above is a Brent Swain design. I built one.
    30 feet or 36 feet. Probably 36. Each plate is about 2,440lbs. 3/16 inch thick.
    I also helped to build two other 36 foot Brent swain boats.
    There is a CAD CAM steel boat designed by Gary Noble and now many others that are pre cut from pre primed plate. That eliminates a lot of sandblasting later on.
    The absolute best book on the subject overall is STEEL AWAY. Then CRUISING AS A WAY of LIFE by Thomas Colvin. A must read. Best book on Aluminum boats is by KLINGEL.

    The problem with the lapstrake metal boat being built is this:
    A lot of over lapping joints makes noise in the water.
    Lots of welding.
    Also more wetted surface=more drag.
    Corrosion can be much greater than steel.
    Aluminum condensates 3.75 times MORE than steel.
    To foam or insulate the aluminum is more expensive for the foam, because it must have a special coating first.
    If it is the newer aluminum for hulls (5356) or newer it will help as far as the corrosion rate.
    Cost is much higher to build the hull.
    My boat fantasy below: "Luckystar"
    hi,
    i just got informed about this thread.
    Im the guy building that lapstrake alloy boat and i can comment on this. 5183 with 4.5% Mg is very corrosion resistant. (more than 5356) so im not worried about this. There are many huge commercial crafts, offshore oil-rig installation etc which are build in marine grade alloy.
    Noise is solved with insulation. (which is same as for steel)
    No need to have special coating when install insulation. Ordinary
    insulationmats (like they use when building those floating offshore rigs for living quarters is OK)
    Cost of alloy is more than steel but if you add upkeep of steel the gap get much closer.. I avoid painting and sandblasting. Running bare alloy is perferctly ok.


    zeyang

  25. #25
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Newsletter February 2012. .

    Dear Sea Gypsies,

    Spring is slowly coming our way, This winter has been really nice
    compared to last winter. It has seldom been below -15, which is quite
    out of normal.

    We had a really nice christmas on the farm, with lots of friends and
    seagypies. This year Santa Claus had an australian accent. We tried to
    teach him the only one and important centence in norwegian - "Are
    there any nice children here" but in last minute he forgot - but the
    "kids" still got their presents. The small ones got proper
    vikinghelmets and dress of course.... What else for seagypses?

    Else we have been doing regular winter maintainance on the farm and
    been looking forward to the spring. The boat project is going forward
    working on small and big pieces on the boat. We have been doing some
    work on how to make a furnace to melt all that scrap aluminum into
    more useful stuff like portholes. Casting is not something new. People
    have been doing thise for ages. Hopefully we manage to make something
    out of brick run on propane or better firewood which we have plenty of
    up here. Any foundry and casting experience out there?

    Anyway, its quite busy up here now but dont forget to enjoy the early
    spring folks! .. and if you want to join our tribe please contact us!

    Pictures.

    a. Enjoy christmas dinner with friends and seagypies.
    b. A young seagypsy quite happy whith his christmaspresent - proper
    viking helmet!
    c. Out walking the mast. Even a mast need some fresh air these days!
    d. We want to duplicate these guys! Anyone with casting/foundry
    experience out there? We want to learn!


    a: http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1330274085
    b: http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1330274091
    c: http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1330274096
    d: http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1330274103

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Thanks for the update. I lost track of your log, and recently wondered about it. There are several threads on this forum about casting, try a google search for this site.

  27. #27
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    There are two, aluminum planked, 50' Richardson motoryachts in Toronto built by Avro, the company that built the Arrow jet fighter. The planks are C-channel and the construction utilizes longerons and ring frames ala aircraft construction. The planks are riveted together at the flange, so no overlap and both vessels are in great shape after 50 years.
    Mike

  28. #28
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Newsletter April 2012. .

    Dear Sea Gypsies,

    Still some time until we are ready to put the seeds into the soil. Its
    more or less -5 degrees C during night last weeks but daytime is above
    zero.

    The days have been spent welding and welding and when we havent done
    welding we have spent time troubleshoot welding machines. They have a
    tendency to break down unfortunately. So we bought 2 more big
    machines. We also got hold of another ton of lead. There seems to be
    no end to how much lead we need for ballast.

    Ahh yes. We got more chickens on the farm. one of our hens found out
    we need some easter chickens this year and she missed by 2 days. Not
    bad. The small one is a little shy so its hard to take a picture
    without getting attacked by the angry mother.

    Today it will be traditional easter-dinner here on the farm with
    people from near and far. Wish you all fair winds and following seas
    and hope you all have a peacful easter.

    picture from last weeks.

    a: our chickens are enjoying longer and warmer days.
    b: two more welding machines arrived on the farm.. It seems we cant
    get enough welding machines.
    c: Our easter chicken arrived 2 days before easter.


    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1333813538
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1333813545
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1333813551

  29. #29
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Newsletter May 2012.

    Dear Sea gypsies

    Spring has come to the farm! And then came summer, and then a few
    blustery days of fall, and finally last Friday and Saturday it snowed
    again. But that will be the last snow of the year, we hope - the mild
    weather seems to have returned, the trees are leafing out, the
    wildflowers are springing up around the river, the bees and the
    neighbors have come out of hibernation (again), and we are hard at
    work.

    This week we mixed a few tons of lovely manure compost into the soil
    of the north field, and planted eleven rows of potatoes - by hand -
    which should give us about 300 kilos of potatoes in the fall to feed
    hungry sea-gypsies all next winter. Next week we'll plant carrots and
    onions, and move some tender warm-weather starts to our new greenhouse
    - radishes, bok choi, spinach, parsley, beets, and sugar peas so tall,
    they might start climbing us if we don't get them out of the kitchen
    soon.

    Work on the boat has really picked up recently. We've been distracted
    with planting, and replumbing the bathroom, and building coldframes
    and the new greenhouse - but now that the potatoes are in the ground
    and the sea-gypsies are in the bath (phew), we are back in the
    boatshed all the time. Our resident woodworker is about to start work
    on a wooden dinghy from a traditional Norwegian design, just as soon
    as he gets the greenhouse finished. And we cast two tons of lead
    ballast, a very medieval process involving a wood-fired furnace in the
    yard. The boat will eventually carry five tons, so there is more
    casting to do as soon as the scrap yard has more lead for us.

    Inside the boat we're sealing off the keel with aluminum plates - the
    bow is nearly done, and then we can put in the last of the bow ribs.
    In the stern, we're wrestling with engine placement - it needs to be
    high enough to fit the cooling system and the primary diesel tank
    underneath, but low enough that the propeller clears the stern.
    Hmmmmm. Fortunately there's plenty to do while we're thinking about
    it - like put on the deck! The boat will start looking dramatically
    different very soon and we're all pretty excited.

    As always, there's room for more in our big sea-gypsy tribe - so if
    you like planting, weeding, shoveling, soldering, sawing, nailing,
    welding, grinding, sewing, cooking, drilling, knitting, routering,
    getting headbutted by chickens, watching 2-hour sunsets, measuring,
    cutting, re-measuring, thinking, re-re-measuring, making bread,
    reading sea books, eating waffles or knot-tying, drop us a line!


    Picture from last weeks.

    a: Sea gypsy girl making psykedelic chair-protection for the chairs.

    b: Shaping wood with router

    c: Potato-planting.

    d: lead melting girl finished melting 2 tonns in one week.


    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1337015044
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1337015051
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1337015058
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1337015064

  30. #30
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Newsletter June 2012.



    Dear Sea gypsies

    We're back to a full farm - the current crew of sea-gypsies hail from
    Norway, Germany (times two), Finland, France/Belgium, the UK and the
    US - it makes for lively, er, discussions in the evenings while we're
    watching Euro Cup matches.

    It also makes for rapid progress - in the last few weeks we've picked
    the entire farm clean of rocks, planted two fields in a mixture of
    cover crops (including phacelia, whose blue flowers are a favorite bee
    snack), built and painted a fence around the yard, re-plumbed the
    basement, fixed our fleet of bicycles, put in almost a kilometer of
    fence around the biggest field, dug up half the far field looking for
    a pipe leak, refinished a beautiful old door... and then, in our spare
    time, built a model for the boat's dinghy, biked all over the area,
    hiked down the river, spent a weekend in Oslo, foraged local plants
    for dinner, built a campfire spot overlooking the valley, installed a
    swing under the barn ramp, given each other mohawks, and baked about
    forty loaves of bread.

    And we're going to be parents! Kind of! One of our chickens has very
    motherly instincts, and she's been incubating thirteen eggs - some
    hers, some laid by the rest of our flock. We're expecting chicks in a
    week or so.

    All the farming hasn't left us much time for boatbuilding, but we
    still managed to make some progress this month: the keelbox has been
    welded shut in bow and stern, the last ribs are being bent to shape
    and welded in, and the calculations for the curve of the deck have
    begun. This week we'll finish the ribs and begin the wood patterns
    for the deck frames.

    We've been eating like royalty - everybody has learned to bake, and
    the spring plants are out in force, so we feast on nettles, milkweed,
    chaga mushrooms, dandelions, wood sorrel, and our own bread. After a
    long winter of turnips, potatoes and carrots, it's wonderful to have
    the green leaves that come with warm days, and the new dishes that
    come with new comrades.


    So, enjoy summer folks, and if you want to join us, just send us an
    email.

    Pictures from last weeks.

    a: Sea-gypsy girl busy planning the route with help of the world-map
    in background.

    b: Fence-banging guys!

    c: The Fencing-crew on the way to the field.

    d: Enjoy a short rest after hours of rockpicking in the field.

    e: Welding up the keelbox inside the boat.


    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1339612761
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1339612773
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1339612784
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1339612791
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1339612800

    

  31. #31
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Newsletter July 2012.


    Dear Sea gypsies

    The summer has been good and productive to us. Mostly nice and warm
    weather for whole june which is more than you can expect up here.. The
    potatoefield and carrot field grow nicely. The sugar peas in the
    small greenhouse is now blooming and soon we will be self-sufficient
    on sugar-pies (that is, if we dont eat more than one pea a day each)
    :-)

    Mid summerday arrived with nice weather and as normal we had a the
    traditional midsummer party sitting around the camp fire eating burned
    marshmallows and dreaming about life out on the deep blue sea...

    Talking about dreaming.. We have been discussing the deck curve for so
    long that we started to get nightmares about this.. but in the end it
    looks pretty good. The deck ribs are bent in, and we are in the stage
    of plating the deck. Sofar the curve looks really nice! The deck area
    will be around 40m2 totally, means we will have space for a hammock or
    two between the masts!

    Ok, that was all for this month,, if you fancy join our constantly
    bigger sea gypsy tribe, please drop us a line. Whish you all a warm
    summer and hope you enjoy our pictures below.

    a: Mid summer party with camp fire and burned marshmallows.

    b: British metalworker. Carpentry is for kids! Big boys only work with
    metal!

    c: Our french plating crew.

    d: Two pretty mermaids (US/Germany) working on deck ribs. Hard hat is
    mandatory when you work under the boat.

    e: Fishing from the pier behind the boatshed. One of these days he
    will hopefully get a fish!

    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1341733638
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1341733644
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1341733649
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1341733655
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1341733663

  32. #32
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Happy to see your progress. Looking forward to your launch. Who knows, maybe I'll see you on the water one day.

  33. #33
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Newsletter Late july 2012.


    Dear Sea gypsies

    Harvest season has just started and we are cutting and drying the gras
    old time style. Its pretty backbreaking work, but our seaygpsy guys
    are a hardworking bunch, so we will finish this step soon. A few more
    weeks and we will also start blueberry and raspberry picking. Then
    comes mushroom and lingonberries. The autumn will sure be be a busy
    one!

    Last weekends it has been a dumpsterdiving craziness which brought us
    lots of goodies like cherries and nectarines. Its pity to throw away
    good food.. so they end up in morning porrige and cakes! mmmm.

    Boatbuilding is going forward at full speed. 6 plates are on and we
    are ready for constructing the deckhouse and soon we start build up
    the wood interior inside the boatw. It will be nice change indeed,
    swapping the welding pistol with a hammer and saw. At least the smell
    of sawdust is better than weldingfume.

    Ok that was small update for last weeks, hope you enjoy our pictures
    and drop us a line if you want to join or gang!

    a: Happy gang of seagypsy guys cutting gras.

    b. Old style harvest. It seems easy but its hard pretty hard work.

    c: Nice rest in hammock after a hard days work.

    d. Polish grinding girl working on deck beams.

    e. Sea gypsies out camping. The lake was a bit too cold for
    swimming.. brr.

    Love from
    Sailing the farm - a sea gypsy tribe of tomorrow.

    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1342947792
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1342947799
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1342947804
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1342947809
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1342947814

  34. #34
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Newsletter August 2012.


    Dear Sea gypsies

    Then it start to rain.... July has been the wettest last 80 years up
    here. Soon we dont need a truck to move the boat. We just launch her
    just behind the shed.

    Due to weather the gras harvest season is a little slow, but it goes
    forward. Some gypsies have also been out in the forest checking for
    the berries but its still some time to go.. Hopefully a week more and
    it will be a fiest of blueberries during the morning porridge.

    Boatbuilding has been good last weeks, due to rain. Thankfully our
    shed is rainproof. We are now working on shaping in the deckhouse so
    it looks nice. Most of the deckplates are welded in. I must say our
    lady without a name start to looks like a proper boat.

    Ahh. forgot to mention. 2 nice chinese girls has been up here last
    week, feeding us proper food. Oh, I must say i really miss that
    stuff. Nothing can beat homemeade chinese food. hmmm.

    Enjoy our pictures. If you want to join our seagypsy and have
    cabinetmaking skills - you are especially welcome. We are getting
    closer to that step...

    a: Real chinese dinner. Chopsticks and everything.

    b. Polish girl - still smiling after a day of heavy brushing.

    c: Work on the deck house. American/French team.

    d. Beijing-girl helping with deckhouse welding.

    Love from
    Sailing the farm - a sea gypsy tribe of tomorrow.



    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1344149640
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1344149645
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1344149651
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1344149655

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Quote Originally Posted by zeyang View Post
    Newsletter August 2012.


    Dear Sea gypsies

    Then it start to rain.... July has been the wettest last 80 years up
    here. Soon we dont need a truck to move the boat. We just launch her
    just behind the shed.

    Due to weather the gras harvest season is a little slow, but it goes
    forward. Some gypsies have also been out in the forest checking for
    the berries but its still some time to go.. Hopefully a week more and
    it will be a fiest of blueberries during the morning porridge.

    Boatbuilding has been good last weeks, due to rain. Thankfully our
    shed is rainproof. We are now working on shaping in the deckhouse so
    it looks nice. Most of the deckplates are welded in. I must say our
    lady without a name start to looks like a proper boat.

    Ahh. forgot to mention. 2 nice chinese girls has been up here last
    week, feeding us proper food. Oh, I must say i really miss that
    stuff. Nothing can beat homemeade chinese food. hmmm.

    Enjoy our pictures. If you want to join our seagypsy and have
    cabinetmaking skills - you are especially welcome. We are getting
    closer to that step...

    a: Real chinese dinner. Chopsticks and everything.

    b. Polish girl - still smiling after a day of heavy brushing.

    c: Work on the deck house. American/French team.

    d. Beijing-girl helping with deckhouse welding.

    Love from
    Sailing the farm - a sea gypsy tribe of tomorrow.



    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1344149640
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1344149645
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1344149651
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1344149655
    When you see all that black around your welds it means the metal is very dirty.
    You need to brush the weld area with a stainless tooth brush before welding.
    At least you are on Welding Web.com.

    And you have the right equipment now.
    I just don't like these cult type set ups.

    Who owns the boat?? If you all own it, you better get that on paper with notary public.
    I just do not like this type social set up.
    It breeds resentment.
    I love the smell of fresh cut plywood in the morning.

  36. #36
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Quote Originally Posted by Lewisboats View Post
    I didn't check but is he using GTAW(TIG) or SMAW(Stick) welding?
    HE who??.... If your talking about the Brent Swain design boat photos he is using the SMAW process (stick welding)
    I love the smell of fresh cut plywood in the morning.

  37. #37
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan McCosh View Post
    Wonder if you could rivet and glue--they make Jaguars that way these days.
    Ford bought 1/2 of Jaguar. So in retaliation, England bought 1/2 of American Airlines.
    I love the smell of fresh cut plywood in the morning.

  38. #38
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan McCosh View Post
    Do you do the welding from the inside or the outside?
    (Donald Branscom answering )A boat hull should be all tacked together. Then the finish welding should be done on the inside first.
    All welding must be done evenly and starting in the center of the hull and work towards the ends. Both sides alternately at the same time. There can be some differences between welding aluminum hulls and steel hulls.
    I love the smell of fresh cut plywood in the morning.

  39. #39
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Newsletter Late August 2012.


    Howdy Sea gypsies


    August has been a good one.... The weather was much nicer than july i
    must admit. even some of those wwoofers start to complain about too
    much sun!

    We have had quite an invasion from volunteers lately, and majority has
    been from US, so now we have a distinct texas-slang around here.

    Boatbuilding is going forward with the speed of light kind of... The
    deck is on. The deckhouse is fixed. Even with the possibility to
    remove to store big stuff inside. We are now working on
    interior. Space for six bunk beds, kitchen and toilet/shower needs
    some thinking...

    We got some cool news lately. two volunteers (french/american) who met
    less than one year ago here on farm, got married... even after
    struggeling so hard to keep those girls and boys in separate barracks!
    ... some stuff must have been happening after dark... hmm. :-)


    That was big and small news from our coolest sea gypsy tribe this
    month. If you fancy joining us, please drop us a line...


    Some pictures from last month.

    a: happy volunteers eating lunch
    b: Deckhouse is soon on.
    c: two pretty mermaids taking care of the raspberry field.
    d: forehatch girl cleaning up inside boat.
    e: wedding picture...


    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1346596178
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1346596185
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1346596191
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1346596196
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1346596203

    Love from
    Sailing the farm - a sea gypsy tribe of tomorrow.

  40. #40
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Newsletter October 2012.

    Our big accomplishment this month was getting the winter bathroom
    constructed, insulated and piped - just in time for the first big
    freeze to hit the pipes in the summer bathroom. (Just in time to wash
    some dirty sea gypsies.) At the beginning of September, it was just a
    dark, drafty hole in the corner of the barn, and now it's a warm and
    bright room with heating, double-glazed windows, a fancy new
    shower... oh, and two couches, a worktable, a bookshelf and our sewing
    machine. We decided it was too big to just be a bathroom, so we made
    the other half into a winter living room. (If showering in the living
    room and hanging out in the bathroom sounds like a weird combination,
    just think of it as practice for living on the boat.)

    In boat news, the deck is on, the deckhouse is constructed and
    suspended precariously from the boatshed ceiling, and we've started on
    the sub-deck and the insulation inside the hull. There's a lot of
    infrastructure to go under the sub-deck - tanks for diesel and fresh
    water, a greywater holding tank under the shower, and 5.5 tons of lead
    ballast. Last week we cast another 600 kilograms of ballast in our
    evil-looking smoky wood-fired crucible - only 1.5 tons left to go!

    We've been doing a lot of farm work the last couple months - fall is
    always a busy season. We harvested those crops we planted back in May
    - onions, carrots, and 300 kilograms of potatoes! - plus lingonberries
    from the nearby forest which we made into jam. And getting ready for
    winter is a big job - cleaning up heaps of scrap wood, burning trash,
    raking hay, organizing the bee stuff, putting snow chains on the farm
    equipment, ghostriding the old tractor into the barn, and getting
    things stowed under roofs before they get lost under the snow until
    spring. We had our first big snowfall last night - about 15cm, and it
    looks like it's going to stick around. The official end of summer
    time on Saturday means the sun goes down around 4:30pm these days, but
    that just gives us more night hours to watch for northern lights.
    Tomorrow is Halloween, and we're going to celebrate by dressing up
    like boatbuilding farmworkers and stealing candy from passing
    children. Happy winter!



    Some pictures and movie from last month.


    This is our house band.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DuzEK...layer_embedded


    a: Beware of moose on deck!
    b: Harvesting the carrot crop.
    c: Making jam from local lingonberries.
    d: Fishing in the local lake.
    e: Fall bonfire with guitar.
    f: Making Swedish pea soup for lunch.


    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1351626439
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1351626445
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1351626453
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1351626460
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1351626467
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1351626523


    Love from
    Sailing the farm - a sea gypsy tribe of tomorrow.

  41. #41
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    26

    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Newsletter December 2012.

    Dear All,

    First of all, Mucho Gracias for all contribution this year - This
    doesent goes just for those of you who have been flying, driving,
    peddaling, walking and swimming up here to lend a hand on the farm and
    the shipbuilding - but it goes also to you who have send support
    mails, commented on forums, asked to help sponsoring the project and
    mailed us. Without your support, we would never have come this far.

    We are now going into the last year of building the Seagypsy Boat #1
    and hopefully start sailing. Yes, i know some of you think she will
    sail only backwards, or even upside down, but sail she will.. .. :-)

    Together we have come a long way taking into consideration that most
    of volunteers coming up here have never done any metalwork or even
    farmwork before, but they all share the same dream...

    To sum up for 2012. We have used more than 2 metric tonns of aluminium
    this year, welded hundreds and hundreds of meters of welding, consumed
    a few hundred kg of Argon gas, melted 5 tonns lead. Not to mention
    breathing way too much welding fumes and aluminium dust...

    On the farm, we have had lots and lots of volunteers who has been in
    charge of growing potatoes, sugar pees, carrots, berries and lots of
    other stuff. They have got new friends and met old ones from prior
    years.

    They have shared and learned, maybe eating too much porridge and
    waffles, laughed, cried, made love (tough I really worked hard here to
    keep those sneaky wwoffers in separate girls/guys barracks!!) :-) Some
    have even taken step to marry! So in sum I think 2012 has been quite a
    good year.

    As we are nearing the end of this year (and not end of the world i
    hope!) I wish you all a peaceful 2013 with much joy and happiness for
    the coming year and we up on the farm really look forward to meet new
    and old volunteers both here and out on the seven seas.

    Fair winds and smooth sailing from

    Sailing the farm - A Sea gypsy tribe of tomorrow.
    Ze


    picture: Boatshed in winter night.

    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1356891300

  42. #42
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
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    Portland, Maine
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    11,851

    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer


  43. #43
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    Dec 2003
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    Sound Beach, NY
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    2,941

    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Thanks and best wishes!

  44. #44
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    Dec 2009
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    26

    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Newsletter March 2013. .

    Dear Sea Gypsies,

    Spring is slowly coming our way, Its been maybe the coldest winter for
    as long as people can remember up here. Minus -30 for weeks out and
    weeks for january and february and even in march we have -20 degrees
    for many days. But we dont complain (at least loudly!) the shed was
    filled to the brink with firewood and during evening and weekends time
    have been spent reading about small pacific islands where the sun
    always shine... Guess where to boat is sailing!

    Last two months have been spent doing foundry work (melting
    aluminium). We are now making our own portholes and all small bits and
    pieces out of the all the scrap alloy we have floating around. Next
    would be to make a few dolphins for decoration :-)

    Anyway, enjoy the early spring folks! .. and if you want to join our
    tribe please contact us!

    Pictures.

    a. making a sand-cast for a small porthole.
    b. Out enjoy the skiing in cold winter weather.
    c. a cake? Nope. Its called cores and used for foundry work! Its a
    miks of sand and linseed oil. Taste awful, but works good.
    d. welding small boxes and stuff together.
    e. Porthole production.

    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1363531570
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1363531577
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1363531582
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1363531588
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q_y-Gh6_YI

  45. #45
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    26

    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Newsletter April 2013.

    Dear Sea Gypsies,

    The potatoes are planted just a few days ago. Thats even earlier than
    last year. It a little risky since its still frostnights up here but
    they are protected under a bed of soil so hopefully they wont freeze.

    Summer is coming very slowly. Still no leafs on the trees, but the
    small yellow flowers - coltsfoot (tussilago farfara) are starting to
    show up along the roads. They are important pollen plants for the bees
    this early in season (together with salix)

    Sailing the farm have 3 nice girls now (irish,zchech,french). 2 guys
    (swedish/english) who have been here the first part of april.

    We have mostly been working on casting portholes for the boat which is
    pretty timeconsuming. It means making molds, melting aluminium and
    then shape the half-finished product in the lathe. The result looks
    really good i must say.

    Even if not even close to being foundrymen/girls or machinists we
    manage to get quite a professional result after some weeks of trial
    and error.

    Thats enough for now, If you fancy joining the seagypsy tribe - just
    drop us a line.

    Love from
    Sailing the farm


    Pictures.

    a. irish girl making sand-castles (sort of)
    b. inspecting the casting results.
    c. swedish sand-crab.
    d. unfinished and finished result. (with the help of a lathe)
    e. turning soil.


    a: http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1367131663
    b: http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1367131670
    c: http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1367131675
    d: http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1367131679
    e: http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1367131684

  46. #46
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Guerneville,CA
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    I still want to know who owns that boat. LOL

    BTW the potatoes will be warmer under the soil by 15F.
    Ask any gopher.
    I love the smell of fresh cut plywood in the morning.

  47. #47
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    26

    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Dear Sea Gypsies Summer is here, its more or less rain every day but the wwofers order sun in the weekends so weather is always nice when we go hiking during weekends, (not sure who they order it from though) We are now up to full speed on boat and the farm. Last week we planted another field of rasperries, which will be give us lots and lots of rasperries in 2 years time. Then another field with potatoes and even more herbs of all different kind. Its getting interesting when the weed is coming up. It will be plenty of weeding soon. The bees are busy collecting honey, and flying all over. they seems pretty happy now after a quite cold may. The portholes are more or less finished - that was a long journey. Its quite a few steps. The good thing: which casting and machining skills there is limit to what we can make in alloy. Plenty of blocks for the boat is already on the list.. We are in the stage of insulating all over inside. Then make ready for the wood deck and railings. The wood deck is not just to make the boat look like a boat, but avoid burned feet on hot alloy deck in the tropics - besides since we are faking everything to look lke wood, so why not a proper wood-deck. Lots of sea gypsies are coming next months, both returning ones and new ones, but we still have some space, so if you have any skills you think could be useful - drop us a line! Pictures: a: sorting out weed in the rasperry field. Then we planted out some hundreds sq-meter more. b: metal girls at work moving heavy alloy-plates. c: casting stuff for the boat. We use sand to mould them. d: welding guy busy welding up ears on the portholes. e: dumpsterdiving. one night catch from the bin at the foodstore. Now we go every weekend to stack up on free fancy food. a: http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1370093474 b: http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1370093482 c: http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1370093489 d: http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1370093497 e: http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1370093504

  48. #48
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    26

    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    August 2013

    Dear Sea Gypsies


    Its been a busy summer up here. plenty of volunteers and plenty of
    work to be done. Our community is growing bigger and bigger and soon
    we will take over the ocean.

    July has been a good one. 3-4 weeks with stable nice weather, even
    some start to complain about too much sun... That was close to end up
    on the plank...

    Our 10 new chickens are all getting big now. We are still curious how
    many of them are roosters - and will end up in the soup :-)

    The garden loook really good thanks to 2 girls who spend quite alot of
    time weeding.. we got plenty of peas this year - all kinds and some
    really tasty. I didnt know yellow peas could be sweet if you eat them
    raw. raspberries are soon ready to ripe and berry season are here in
    some weeks.

    The boat is really start to look like a proper boat. mostly all
    portholes are in. skylights and railing seems stong and seaworthy.
    there are quite a bit of woodworking to do inside, but we all look
    forward to this.

    So in sum, we are doing quite a bit of progress and its still a couple
    of month until the winter is back so things look pretty good keeping
    the schedule.

    If you have an interest in joing our sea gypsy tribe dont hesitate to contact us.


    Love from Sailing the farm.

    Pictures: (courtsey ela/photograephin)

    a: weeding the potatoefield
    b: queenbreeding
    c: picnic at the lake.
    d: welding stuff on the deck
    e: travelling outdoor library (kind of)


    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1376214077
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1376214095
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1376214109
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1376214121
    http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1376214135

  49. #49
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Guerneville,CA
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    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan McCosh View Post
    This looks like an extreme of multi-chine construction. It does seem the total length of the welded seams reaches extremes--a significant drawback to the technique. I've seen single-chine derivatives of similar hulls what work quite well. I'm thinking that the welding rod alone would be a significant percentage of the material cost.
    Welding an aluminum boat does cost much more than steel.
    The equipment is more expensive.

    A boat hull has to be all tacked together and then fully welded inside first.
    Then the outside.
    Also the welding procedure is important.
    The welding should start in the middle of the boat and be worked towards each end.
    The welding needs to be welded port side then starboard alternately.
    With lapstrake both sides may have to be worked on at once.
    But there is a very good book written by Klingel about this.

    Aluminum can distort more than steel or stainless steel.
    As the aluminum weldment (hull) gets larger and larger it can
    take more heat to weld because the aluminum is giving off heat
    at a very rapid rate. That is why wire feed is best.
    It has the greatest heat input.

    Wire feed with a spool gun or with a drive unit with 4 roller feed wheels with push and pull system.
    All of this technical information can get extensive with aluminum.
    A huge discussion and learning curve.

    If I was doing this job I would consult with the large aluminum boat builders
    in the Pacific Northwest about
    equipment selection.
    I love the smell of fresh cut plywood in the morning.

  50. #50
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    26

    Default Re: Aluminum Lapstrake Colin Archer

    November 2013

    Dear Sea Gypsies

    Whops. time is flying so fast and soon october was gone and no
    newsletter sent out so here it comes a little late.

    Still no snow up here, which is just incredible. Should have been half
    a meter by now.. but the good thing is: it feels like mid-europe
    climate so why migrate to Spain when Spain is coming to us!

    Farming season is over, everything which was planted during summer is
    in the basement. We got around 300 kg of potatoes which will keep us
    going until spring. We have turned into professional dumpster-divers
    and find way too much food - so we are getting a little picky - What
    about raspberries from Brazil? Its hard to believe so much food who is
    just wasted. Someone should do something... ahh. enough political
    rambling..

    Boatbuilding is going really good. She is happy as a fiddle. Latley
    she got shiny bowrollers installed, (both forward and aft), tiller,
    and soon to come: bowsprit! We just have to cut down the tree.
    Everyday we see changes, and its a good sign... We are making the fat
    lady ready for the 7 seas. She will be the strongest boat ever sailing
    out there.


    Thats all for this late october newsletter, If you are interested in
    becoming a seay gypsy, just drop us a line.

    Love from Sailing the farm.
    A sea gypsy tribe of tomorrow.

    Pictures:

    a: A little crowded on deck. Even the anchors are soon installed.
    b: Picnic and out looking for a bowsprit in the forest. (6 meter long)
    c: Hardcore welders in action.
    d: The sea-monster looking trough the porthole
    e: Fancy dumpster lunch with sushi!


    a: http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1383332827
    b: http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1383332836
    c: http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1383332847
    d: http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1383332855
    e: http://weldingweb.com/attachment.php...1&d=1383332862

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