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Thread: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

  1. #1
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    Default 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    Last friday the 12-metre JENETTA from 1939 by Alfred Mylne was transfered from Pitt Lake in Canada and is on it's way to Flensburg, Germany for her restauration. It will be done by Oliver Berking who recently restored SPHINX, another 12-metre.

    Just a little varnish needed, what a perfect deal







    I've heard of a very relaxed project plan to get her to racing condition next summer.

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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    Quote Originally Posted by ingo View Post
    Last friday the 12-metre JENETTA from 1939 by Alfred Mylne was transfered from Pitt Lake in Canada and is on it's way to Flensburg, Germany for her restauration.
    Kinda wonder why they don't just send the ballast keel and maybe the rudder over and start from scratch...
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    Last edited by elf; 11-17-2009 at 09:29 PM.
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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    Like some of Ralph Stanley's "restorations", he scarfed a bit of old wood into the brand new keeel and called it a rebuild.
    This lift and passage to the shop is more about provenance than the entirely rotten wooden hull.
    Study Peace

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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    Is there anything wood that can be reused?
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    Totally agree with Rum Pirate's comments about the lifting and would add my own about the absence of a cradle.Laying the boat on its side is unlikely to do anything good.It used to be the case that 12 metres were built to Lloyds scantlings and this may have contributed to the hull lasting as well as it had.

  7. #7
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    Angry Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    Nice professional lift.
    You'd do other Canadians a big favor if you'd list their name.

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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    Quote Originally Posted by ingo View Post


    I've heard of a very relaxed project plan to get her to racing condition next summer.

    all I can say is WTF?!
    There's the plan, then there's what actually happens.

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  9. #9
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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    WTF? When I first saw the pictures I figured she was a total loss being lifted from the bottom of a lake.

    How long ago was this picture taken?


    And how the hell did they manage to do this:


    Seems pretty bad to me.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    I'm amazed the lead didn't just drop off her in mid-air.

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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    Quote Originally Posted by rbgarr View Post
    I'm amazed the lead didn't just drop off her in mid-air.
    The center cable is holding it.
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Coose View Post
    Like some of Ralph Stanley's "restorations", he scarfed a bit of old wood into the brand new keeel and called it a rebuild.
    This lift and passage to the shop is more about provenance than the entirely rotten wooden hull.
    Yup. No intention of rebuilding at all, or they would have used more care. Sort of like when they 'rebuilt' the Macedonian -- took the name and built a new ship.

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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    Hey, weren't these built with lifting eyes on the keel?

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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    I guess Oliver Berking (Boatyard Owner) will just use the keel or perhaps just the Right of Name/Construction and build an essentially new boat.

    Ingo - you were faster than I

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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    I agree that its sad to see a once fine boat treated like a piece of firewood, what nobody has mentioned is that anyone lifting a load of this magnitude in this cavalier manner is going to have a bad accident sooner rather than later. In one photo there are two guys standing on her with the cables already biting in. I reckon they were lucky no one got killed.

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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    If not straps even simple spreaders on the cables would have prevented crushing the hull like that.

    I agree it was pretty stupid. I wouldnt have stood on the boat while that was going on.
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    Quote Originally Posted by TimH View Post
    The center cable is holding it.
    Just at the heel though.

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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    I'm not going to argue about the lifting. Just one remark - from the first photo, it appears, that not all the damage is due to the cables. Actually, I'd say at least one of the holes, the one behind the most forward cable, was present before the lifting began. I'd say no strength whatever left in the planking - not above the water line.

    I guess the intention was to start more or less from scratch anyway - otherwise, well, it wouldn't be suitable practice ...

  19. #19
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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    Indeed there is no chance to save even a piece of the hull. The boat is totally rotten and therefor you have to rebuild rather than restaurate her.
    What would have be better when they lifted her more gentle? Does anyone believe any plank could be saved??? No chance.

    I think it is wonderful that there are people like Oliver Berking who take care even of these total wracks. He had proved he is able to bring new life to rotten twelves.

    It may hurt to see a rotten boat. But this one will be born again.

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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    When she was more or less in one piece, they could have taken off her lines. No argument here as to her repairability. All that was left was her shape, who knows what hardware (probably not much), and the lead.
    Ham fisted work is pathetic no matter the reason.

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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    The stories and connections these boats have is continually amazing.....

    Today I was doing some research reading on the Urry Brothers and their racing cutter Cresset. As some know presently we in Silva Bay are the caretakers of the world's largest collection of Urry Brothers yachts. My 50' cogge Blackfish and the 40' cutter Cresset are both here, Cresset being restored by the owner and my son, and our boat being properly finished out plus restored.

    Anyway.....it turns out that the Urry brothers are responsible for Jenetta being in BC! Apparently Jenetta was laid up during the war and converted for cruising afterward. In 1953 the Urry's were on a visit to the UK when they bought her. In consultation with Robert Clark they converted her to a ketch and did a season of cruising with some local racing in Scotland. They then had her shipped home to Vancouver on the deck of a freighter, were she became the largest sailing yacht in the RVYC for many years.
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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    Quote Originally Posted by TR View Post
    The stories and connections these boats have is continually amazing.....

    Today I was doing some research reading on the Urry Brothers and their racing cutter Cresset. As some know presently we in Silva Bay are the caretakers of the world's largest collection of Urry Brothers yachts. My 50' cogge Blackfish and the 40' cutter Cresset are both here, Cresset being restored by the owner and my son, and our boat being properly finished out plus restored.

    Anyway.....it turns out that the Urry brothers are responsible for Jenetta being in BC! Apparently Jenetta was laid up during the war and converted for cruising afterward. In 1953 the Urry's were on a visit to the UK when they bought her. In consultation with Robert Clark they converted her to a ketch and did a season of cruising with some local racing in Scotland. They then had her shipped home to Vancouver on the deck of a freighter, were she became the largest sailing yacht in the RVYC for many years.
    Until Endless Summer?

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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    Quote Originally Posted by johnw View Post
    Until Endless Summer?
    Don't know which boat...there may have been a number of larger ones in the later 60's. The book I'm into now is a RVYC history up until 1965, Jenetta was largest until then. There was a 66' Monk design (Spirit) built in Vancouver in 1946 and a 65 A&R built yawl imported in 1953, and a bunch of 8 metres.
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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    Endless Summer (Dame Pattie) arrived in 1970.

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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    The boat - or what is left after the kraning and the transport arrived in Flensburg a couple of weeks ago.

    perhaps I will find the time to walk over to take some pics, or to get some wood for my stove ;-)

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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    "Restoration"? When I saw the first pic I thought the thread was a joke. I don't know how they can claim whatever the build to be a restored classic. But as you say posession of the hull and a few splinters in a deck beam mak it legal I guess. That said it will be good to see another sailing again.

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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    The ballast keel is the boat, yes? I always thought that was the case, anyway. All Herr Berking wanted was the ballast keel, but he sort of took care of a problem for the people of Canada AND acknowledged the proprieties by taking the entire carcass. I don't see why people would freak out over it.

    Mickey Lake

  28. #28
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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    Yes, but his yacht-architect already had all the plans but he also needed parts of the hull (ribs, planks...) to confirm their plans and to answer a couple of questions.

  29. #29
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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    I found the article in the local paper.

    This is what is left:



    The boatbuilder needed parts of the bow and stern apart from the necessary keel to rebuilt the boat.

  30. #30
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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    As long as the boat does not exist somewhere else it's a restoration.

    Luckily these boats where built from drawings that are still available. While it is regrettable that no Canadian stepped up, it is (IMO) a good thing that someone still sees value in the care-taking of such a ship.

    From what I can see Jenetta may be one of only two surviving Mylne designed 12 metres. The other (reported on the 12m site http://www.12mr.de/index.shtml) being Mouchette of 1908, currently owned by the Tigre Maritime Museum in Argentina, where Leigh II (Vito Dumas) also rests. I can't find any information on whether Mouchette is sailing or on display or just in the collection.
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  31. #31
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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    Quote Originally Posted by skuthorp View Post
    "Restoration"? ... But as you say posession of the hull and a few splinters in a deck beam mak it legal I guess.
    I used to know someone who dated a guy who was into "restoring" antique aircraft. I may have this wrong, but as I remember it he was actually building replicas, but as long as he used even a small fragment of an original plane it was legally permissible to claim it as a "restoration," which then allowed him to avoid certain rules that would otherwise apply to newly-built aircraft. Or so he said.

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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    My first sailing was on US10, Mitena, then in the hands of John & June Van Voorhis, of Rochester, New York. A Herreshoff design, built in City Island, I reckon. 73 feet, canoe stern, no life rails, a tiller. Boat like that could pull the first foot out of the grave.
    I suspectacate that the name was borned out of the fact that the first owner went to MIT, who as luck would claim it, also has the original plans, I have been told. There survives a shot of a guy in a pith helmet at the stick, with two Babes, lounging in that tufted velour that covered the cushions on her horseshoe-shaped cockpit. It looks like the 50's, considering the bathing suits.
    Well, when I was about 15, she left Rochester, and I have looked for her for 45 years, until someone gave me a name & town two months ago.
    She floats.
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  33. #33
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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Paskey View Post
    I used to know someone who dated a guy who was into "restoring" antique aircraft. I may have this wrong, but as I remember it he was actually building replicas, but as long as he used even a small fragment of an original plane it was legally permissible to claim it as a "restoration," which then allowed him to avoid certain rules that would otherwise apply to newly-built aircraft. Or so he said.
    As a former director of a large outdoor Museum, I can tell you that there are stories, opinions, and tons o' claptrap on this restoration/rebuilt/ replicate/Jesus stop me before I do some real damage debate.
    I have heard people from England (of all places) say that a boat faithfully built to the design and lines of a pilot cutter could not be called a pilot cutter because it never hauled around pilots.
    Somewhere along the line we should be glad that the boat was saved, or recreated, or built from the twinkle in the Divine's Eye.
    One Man's Opinion.

  34. #34

    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    Speaking as someone to whom it is likely has a stronger attachment and affection for Jenetta than any remaining soul alive today, its hard to describe the sadness, anger and relived frustration I feel when seeing these recent photos. I've shown them to others in my family and its a pretty teary thing.

    For all of my youth this boat was beyond iconic to me. The owners (the Urrys) were very close to my father and although having our own boats, I spent many, many hours sailing, working on and simply just sitting on Jenetta. For years after it was my hope to someday own the vessel and bring her back to her former glory. Sadly the complete idiot that owned her for the last 30 years would not sell her for anything approaching reasonable (at least when I was dealing with him) and this is how it ended up...not surprising, just sad.

    Although a generation younger, my dear dad spent much time with the Urry brothers. They were to design his own boat 'Cambria' which was to be the first real light displacement boat in the Vancouver area. The blunt bow and long run aft were typical of Urry designs but she was much faster than any of their previous designs and dad won nearly all there was to win with her.

    Much to my mother's chagrin they were invited to the Clyde Fortnight for their honeymoon in '53 to race Jenetta before the Urrys had her cruzified prior to coming to Canada. Contrary to a posting above she hadn't been laid out for cruising after the War. The British boats at the time were rather lavish when they left the builder's yards. The owners would sail them around the Isles for the racing season and often stay aboard. Jenetta still had her crews quarters up forward complete with pipe berths and small galley. I marveled at the cabin doors because although looking like solid wood, they were actually a thin mahogany ply over an early form of styrofoam....marvelous stuff.

    She arrived in '54 with a ketch rig, double headsail, loose-footed main and minus 10,000 pounds of ballast. The back stays for the main were operated from two highfield levers near the helm and it was remarkable how easy the boat could be sailed. Even when in their seventies, Mr and Mrs Urry could sail the boat themselves.

    When George O'Brian mused about the America's Cup and went as far as purchasing Dame Pattie (which he re-named Endless Summer....a considerably smaller Twelve than Jenetta) he wanted to re-rig Jenetta as a sloop and use her as a trial horse. Even at that time Jenetta was starting to show serious need of attention. Bute Slip Dock who built the boat used the iron every third frame technique and they were already starting to corrode badly. Some of the iron web bracing fore and aft of the mast step was even worse. As well, after 18 years of a ketch rig, the mizzen shrouds had hogged the hull at the attachment points.

    After the passing of the final Urry brother circa 1972, the widow offered the boat to my father and my brother and I pleaded with him to get it but he showed us the troubles in the bilge and sadly but probably wisely (on his income) he declined.

    She ended up going to a Sea Scout troop in Victoria BC and became somewhat unsightly with a monstrous dog-house attached. She continued to slowly die until the fellow that let her sink acquired her then it really started unravel.

    Even though our family never owned the old girl we did however acquire the beautiful 10 foot dinghy that was Jenetta's tender complete with two sets of lovely copper-capped spoon oars (marked with her name). Cold-molded by Souters, this fabulous little vessel is the best rowing dinghy I've ever used and is now the tender for my 1943 AVR which served as USAAF P-619. I'm bringing this boat back to original military layout (including the crazy V-12s) and as they were supplied with a dinghy of this dimension, the fit is near perfect. So, on the bright side I am reminded of Jenetta vitually every day as I see her little dinghy turtled over the AVR's engine hatch. Previous to this boat, the wee one was the dinghy for my Six Metre as well and the Jenetta embossed oars were stored in the foc'sle for use on those calm days.

    Hats off to the gentleman taking on this re-creation...good on him. No doubt a beautiful vessel will be brought forth. But in my very humble opinion this will be a replica (even the ballast keel is not complete). Jenetta died when the last Urry did and I sometimes wonder if it was the spirit of Wavell Urry that kept me from owning her.
    Last edited by jenetta lover; 02-03-2010 at 12:38 PM.

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    Default Re: 12-metre restauration: Just a little varnish needed ;-)

    Thank you much for the reminiscences!

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