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Thread: Rope Mainsheet Travellers (Bridle Horse?)

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    108

    Post

    Hello Guys

    I want to control the sail twist a little more on the 250 sqft main on my 24' double-ender.

    Currently the mainsheet is a 3:1 purchase sheeted right at the end of the 17' boom.

    It sheets from a very robust boom gallows frame of ss tube, and can freely travel from side to side across this. There is no lower block, the sheet simply turns around the tube. It is very simple, but as you can imagine, without a sheave there is some more friction than I would like. This could be solved by using a block at the lower end and controlling its position across the boat from the gallows frame.

    I've been trying to devise a rope horse system that allows for precise control - something rather better than the laser type, but simplicity is eluding me.

    I don't want to use a lot of blocks in a tackle as being a double-ender, the base is quite narrow and reducing it by having the system double-blocked won't really achieve much

    Has anyone seen a very simple solution to this issue ??

    many thanks (especially if you have taken the trouble to try and understand this rant, I find it difficult to describe the situation clearly !!)

    Foster Price
    Southland
    New Zealand

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Whangarei, New Zealand
    Posts
    769

    Post

    HI Foster,
    Good to hear you are still getting some sailing in down south.
    My 2 c worth.
    I did a lot of Laser sailing and the big thing with the rope traveler was that it had to be really tight, those of us who where into racing them would lower the tiller angle to make it as close to a straight line as posible.
    The reason for this was that unless you got the rope real tight the traveler would not go right out. The more sheet tension you applied the more the traveler would try to center itself, this is why lasers use so much boom vang.
    In light weather you left the traveler slack and it was like using a traveler uphaul to center the car. Am I making sense?

    This is some thing I have been thinking about as the track and car options are expensive and a pipe traveler across a curved cabing top has to be very high at the ends. Some of the dingy classes are using rope travelers again (Flying 15's) but generaly they also have very effective boom vangs.

    Have you considered a rope traveler and using a traveler control from each side.
    Zane

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    St. Simon\'s Island, GA, USA
    Posts
    4,331

    Post

    Have you thought about leaving the sheeting as it is, and controlling the twist with a boom vang? This might be a lot simpler.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Whangarei, New Zealand
    Posts
    769

    Post

    Heres a thought.
    Following on from ahp's comment.
    On our current and previous keeler's we don't have the boom height above the cabin top to fit a boom vang so what we do is have a handy billy on a 6"wide webing strap around the boom about 1/3 of the way back from the mast. Whenever we want some extra leach tension we take the hook down from the gooseneck and hook it into the aft side chain plate. This also can be used as a preventer. (just remember to remove it before jibing.) I have to admitt that while we used it a lot in our H28 on our current boat with mid boom sheeting and a traveler across the cabin top we don't use it so much as we can generate a fair bit of sheet tension if we need it.

    [ 05-17-2003, 04:07 AM: Message edited by: Zane Lewis ]

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Location
    Eureka, CA. USA
    Posts
    36

    Post

    A friends frisco flyer had the lower mainsheet block fastened to a ring that slid back and forth on a sort of boom crutch rod. The rod had washers? that it ran through. The washers were welded to the rod at about six inch intervals. The mainsheet ring was just big enough to slip over the washer things when the sheet was loose, but when the sheet was tightened the ring would hang up on the washer things allowing the mainsheet to be stoped at one of those six inch intervals. Even way to windward. Worked pretty slick. Another option is a vang travler preventer rig from a "Good Old Boat" article of a couple of years ago. It is esentially two vangs attached to the boom where you would expect with the other end of each attached to opposite chainplates. You lead the running parts (tails) to cleats at the rear of the cockpit. You tighten both to pull the boom down like a conventional vang. You can tighten one and loosen the other to pull the boom to one side or the other as a traveler would, and tighten one with the other loose to act as a preventer when going downwind. They are all a compromise on the real thing but unless you are a racer it's a cheap way to do all three. you can have the lines that lead back (tails) to be one continuose line toprevent cluter. Have fun. Tom

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