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Ena_II
07-20-2009, 12:35 AM
Hi,

I am looking for a hand tool to recut or dress the deck seams.

My decks are 1/2"white beech (Australian) laid over dynalled ply.

The deck is probably 20 years old and is wearing down over time such that the old silkaflex is coming out.

I tried a router but is not controllable enough. Same story with a small circular saw.

I think a hand tool may be a little more forgiving.

Any ideas?

RFNK
07-20-2009, 02:28 AM
This decking seems to usually be screwed to the deck - straight through the sheathing and into the ply. It's a disaster if it's done that way. Check and if it is, get it off as soon as you can before it rots out your deck and deck beams. Sorry to sound alarmist or pessimistic about this but I'm currently demolishing the second deck I've seen ruined by this approach - and for me, that's 2/2. At least check underneath a few strips - if the screws have grey patches around them in the ply - sorry, you'll have to get it all off. Also check the edges - there's also a good chance that the sheathing doesn't extend over the gunwales. If it doesn't, then the ply will have begun to rot around the edges and, depending on your deck beam and planking timber, may have affected these as well. Teak decking in this application doesn't fare well - Queensland beech is worse. If you have these problems - and I hope you don't - then fixing the seams with Sikaflex will only trap the moisture that's already there. Rick

Larks
07-20-2009, 03:14 AM
I've only done it once, which is enough, when I helped a guy strip all of the seams on the teak deck of his 40' GRP yacht. He had some special tool that he'd bought somewhere and I made up one to do what it looked like his tool was supposed to do using an old file with the end hooked over and the file itself wrapped with a bit of rag and then gaffer tape for a grip. It was ideal for the job of dragging out the old seams by hand and was just right for the size of the seams (but didn't help my knees at all). He ended up ditching his "special tool" and made another seam stripper the same as mine.

peter radclyffe
07-20-2009, 11:45 AM
if you get a small router, & fasten a guide batten in the nearest seam, with small screws, use a 4mm bit , slowly, carefully, you can take 2 depths, or make a gougeing plane from a 4mm chisel, or screwdriver, in a block of wood, angled as a plane, set with a wedge like an old wood plane

The Bigfella
07-20-2009, 04:47 PM
I made a tool for cleaning out seams using some old power bandsaw blade sections about 4" long, side by side in a bit of crushed tube, part of which forms a handle. Haven't tried it yet though.

Ena_II
07-20-2009, 10:51 PM
Ena was extensively rebuilt in the late 80s, we owned her the last 14. There is not much of the original boat left. One day i will post some of the rebuild pics if requested. I think the previous shipwright owner knew what he was doing, the result a very sturdy craft.

I have removed numerous screws from the ply glued and replugged. no sign of rot.

We live aboard so normally any issues are spotted and dealt with quick sharp.

Thanks for your reply and advice.

Andy C

Ena_II
07-20-2009, 10:53 PM
I've only done it once, which is enough, when I helped a guy strip all of the seams on the teak deck of his 40' GRP yacht. He had some special tool that he'd bought somewhere and I made up one to do what it looked like his tool was supposed to do using an old file with the end hooked over and the file itself wrapped with a bit of rag and then gaffer tape for a grip. It was ideal for the job of dragging out the old seams by hand and was just right for the size of the seams (but didn't help my knees at all). He ended up ditching his "special tool" and made another seam stripper the same as mine.

Sounds good for removing the Silka, not sure about how it would cut the grooves deeper, that is the challenge,

Thanks for the reply.

Andy C.

Ena_II
07-20-2009, 10:56 PM
if you get a small router, & fasten a guide batten in the nearest seam, with small screws, use a 4mm bit , slowly, carefully, you can take 2 depths, or make a gougeing plane from a 4mm chisel, or screwdriver, in a block of wood, angled as a plane, set with a wedge like an old wood plane
Dont trust my self with the router, I tried but it is unforgiving on start up and if you wander off there is no warning.

The home made plane might be good.

Thanks for the reply.

Andy C.

Ena_II
07-20-2009, 10:57 PM
Sounds like a good application for
https://www.dualsaw.com/

Vidiolooks good, 60Hz product for the states. not sure if I would trust my self.

Andy C.

Ena_II
07-20-2009, 11:05 PM
I made a tool for cleaning out seams using some old power bandsaw blade sections about 4" long, side by side in a bit of crushed tube, part of which forms a handle. Haven't tried it yet though.

Thanks, sound plausable, will have a look at it.

Thanks all for answering my first post on this forum. It was dutifully added to my favorite favorites.

Candyfloss
07-20-2009, 11:12 PM
[quote=peter radclyffe;2262262]if you get a small router, & fasten a guide batten in the nearest seam, with small screws, use a 4mm bit , slowly, carefully, you can take 2 depths,[quote]

This is easily the best way to do it mate. You need the guide batten. You sure as hell can't freehand it. If your planks are straight layed it's straight forward. If they are curved you will need to cut your guide batten in scallops so it will bend easily, but still give you something to tack thru into the adjacent seam. I used a Makita trimmer. Wear knee pads.

Larks
07-20-2009, 11:18 PM
Sounds good for removing the Silka, not sure about how it would cut the grooves deeper, that is the challenge,

Thanks for the reply.

Andy C.


Sorry Andy, didn't read your first post properly, I thought you were just trying to replace the seams. I haven't had to do what you propose but it seems from any of the books I've had that the battens and a small router idea is still the best idea, using the adjacent seam (or one over) as the guide to locate the batten as mentioned above.

Ena_II
07-21-2009, 02:53 AM
[quote=TonyH;2262957]Hi Andy

Is this ENA the beautiful steam yacht, that we're talking about? :eek:


quote]


Sorry Ena II (two) built 1936 Sydney (Balmain) by Gordon Beatie.
Still beautiful, restored, massively 1986-early 1990s. I cant take the credit. We are the custodians for the last 14 years. If I knew how to post pics I would do so. My post Pic is the current boat.

Some kind of wooden plane rig wood be possible but I suspect it would be a long, long job. How many metres of seams in your deck?[/

boattruck
07-21-2009, 09:07 AM
Seam Ripper, I'm of the small saw and batten school, there is a model of Porter Cable that has a longish base that does the trick, stack up a couple of blades to get the desired thickness and saw away, I do agree it is a good time to look at the ply in a few choice spots before you completely destroy your knees fixing a deck that may be a gonner anyway...Best of luck, BT