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View Full Version : Weather patterns, are yours changing?



WX
07-09-2009, 01:44 AM
Are you getting more extreme weather events? Are you seeing wildlife, land and sea, you wouldn't normally see in your area?
More rain, less rain? Coastal erosion? Hotter Summers, colder Winters?
You get the idea.

dhic001
07-09-2009, 01:49 AM
Yep, we have suffered from global cooling this winter, lots of heavy frosts. Maybe we are heading back into the Little Ice Age?
Daniel

LeeG
07-09-2009, 01:57 AM
it keeps changing,,hot in the summer, cold in the winter. I'm only 53 so it's always new.

2MeterTroll
07-09-2009, 02:12 AM
we have had some tropicals up here that folks have never seen before in the area.
yes we got beach erosion and its building in some places. we have a dead zone off the coast that seems to be growing. theres so many little local indicators showing up that its hard to pull specifics. I have a libertarian friend thats a bee keeper; who has for years opposed the climate change idea who has come round due to his records showing some rather severe impacts on is hives. not to mention the random weather stuff going on. we had our selves a little twisty storm here not long ago.

oh and its been so mild i am planting fern trees.

Domesticated_Mr. Know It All
07-09-2009, 02:37 AM
Unusually mild.
Breezy.
Great sailing weather.
Fishing is good too.
It's almost too good.

Three Cedars
07-09-2009, 02:45 AM
Our June which just ended was the warmest on record by an average of 2.5 degrees Celsius which is quite unusual for a temperate coastal area ( mid - Vancouver Island ). The plants just took off at an incredible rate. Then just a few days ago we had an unusual thunder and lightning storm which went on for 8 hours which no one including old-timers could remember anything like it. This past winter was quite dry with a below average snowpack at higher altitudes.

Coastal erosion is always going on but doesn't seem to be accelerating , sea levels have been rising for decades around here from what I've read.

As for wildlife .... the odd brown pelican has been seen for the past few summers as for land animals only homo sapiens of the older variety have migrated in noticeable numbers. Hard to say about fish as the oceans are being fished to death everywhere. Ocean temperatures are rising and acidification is happening everywhere so the experts are telling us.

James Lovelock figures that there will be an 80% die off of human population this century

http://www.alternet.org/environment/141081/the_dark_side_of_climate_change%3A_it%27s_already_ too_late%2C_cap_and_trade_is_a_scam%2C_and_only_th e_few_will_survive/

seanz
07-09-2009, 02:48 AM
CCCCCCCOOOOOOLLLLLLLLLDDDDDDDD!!!!!!!!!!!

Coldest May and June for some time here, not so much a pattern as an anomaly.


Cold I tell ya.



:D

seanz
07-09-2009, 03:03 AM
James Lovelock figures that there will be an 80% die off of human population this century


Does he mean 80% reduction?
Those of us alive in 2009 probably won't see 2300 anyway.
:rolleyes::)


Think happy thoughts
Think happy thoughts
Think happy thoughts
Think happy thoughts
Think happy thoughts
Think happy thoughts

:D

Big Woody
07-09-2009, 03:19 AM
Our Kansas summer has been surprisingly cool and wet this year. Normally July is hot and dry with high winds like a blast furnace. Last night I went outside in a short sleeve shirt and got downright chilly. That is pretty unusual for July here. Our weather here usually sucks so bad that we're rooting for any kind of climate change we can get.
But at least the brutal weather here keeps the riffraff away.

The Bigfella
07-09-2009, 03:28 AM
Nothing unusual.

Saw a bit of beach erosion with the storms - not as bad as late 60's .

Wet winter - had worse - a lot worse..... I seem to recall every soccer match being wet one year in the 90's

shamus
07-09-2009, 03:53 AM
The drought in South East Tasmania during which we've had very little winter rain for years has finally (temporarily?) broken. Hobart had its wettest June since 1954. Many towns including ours had a very wet June. It seems cold this winter after the last few which have seemed mild.Everyone has been talking about it- a return to the winters they remember as kids - but according to the weather bureau 'taint so. They say June mean was bang on average. Come to think of it I suppose a return to average would be colder.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
07-09-2009, 05:02 AM
Does he mean 80% reduction?
Those of us alive in 2009 probably won't see 2300 anyway.
:rolleyes::)

...
Or 2100 even.

BUT Wait ---- Breaking News (http://www.google.com/hostednews/ukpress/article/ALeqM5hqJ8PlWPK1RaJKMqSyJhaw1UPRYQ)

And seriously depressing - look what happened to them.

skuthorp
07-09-2009, 05:18 AM
Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes.
But then I've only been about since 1943 so what do I know?

John Smith
07-09-2009, 05:25 AM
Are you getting more extreme weather events? Are you seeing wildlife, land and sea, you wouldn't normally see in your area?
More rain, less rain? Coastal erosion? Hotter Summers, colder Winters?
You get the idea.
Long term: When I was a boy and through high school, which I graduated in '64, our local ponds froze every winter, all winter, and I enjoyed skating on them almost daily.

Those same ponds, with a very few rare exceptions, haven't frozen sufficiently for ice skating in 25 years.

BarnacleGrim
07-09-2009, 05:26 AM
Winter here was pretty cold, though northerners would laugh at me for saying that. I was hoping for mostly rain and no snow, but at least the cold weather gives you some temporary peace from the global warming prophets.

Nicholas Scheuer
07-09-2009, 06:58 AM
I've been reading that very low sunspot activity may be bringing on another COLD spell (hesitate to call it an Ice Age).

Historically, low sunspot activity has always brought on the the cold. Sunspots are almost nonm-existant at present.

Moby Nick

Tom Hunter
07-09-2009, 07:05 AM
We had the most overcast June since 1946. Lots of rain but not a record.

Longer term our first frost is coming later, and our spring melt a bit earlier. There are more Winter thaws, they are warmer, and longer duration.

The change that boggles my mind is the North West Passage. People are doing it in yachts now.

PeterSibley
07-09-2009, 07:08 AM
There is no such thing as normal weather here , a look at the rainfall records for the last 100 years shows anything from 20 inches in a year to 100 .

Anything at all !

The Bigfella
07-09-2009, 07:17 AM
...snip...
The change that boggles my mind is the North West Passage. People are doing it in yachts now.

Before the Little Ice Age, the Vikings used to trade with the Inuits, around Ellesmere Island, Skraeling Island and Ruin Island - one would think that the Northwest Passage may well have been just as navigable.

huisjen
07-09-2009, 07:26 AM
The day of ice thawing to the point where Walker Pond here in Brooksville can be rowed across has moved from an average of April 15 fifty years ago to March 31 in recent years.

Besides that, there are the various oscillations in weather pattern. Eight years ago, Maine was in the grip of a serious drought. (Not by Australian standards, but people were giving the well drillers good business.) Now we're in a wet stretch. Some say that the difference between a wet year and a dry year has become more pronounced, and likewise for hot versus cold years. Six or seven years ago we'd have several days a summer up over 100F. This year we've hardly broken 80F, but the hot weather will be back.

Today the sun is out. Small Reach Regatta participants are arriving and launching today.

Dan

huisjen
07-09-2009, 07:27 AM
Before the Little Ice Age, the Vikings used to trade with the Inuits, around Ellesmere Island, Skraeling Island and Ruin Island - one would think that the Northwest Passage may well have been just as navigable.

No, one would not, unless one had one's head in the sand. There are ways to check the age of the ice that's breaking up, and the NW passage was definitely not open.

Dan

The Bigfella
07-09-2009, 07:30 AM
From Wiki...

According to the testimony of Viking sagas (http://www.woodenboat.com/wiki/Saga) such as the Saga of Erik the Red (http://www.woodenboat.com/wiki/Saga_of_Erik_the_Red) and Grœnlendinga saga (http://www.woodenboat.com/wiki/Gr%C5%93nlendinga_saga), from approximately AD 1000 to 1200 (a conservative interval that also happens to include the dates allotted to some of the larger Norse ships), the Arctic appears to have been much warmer even than now, as full-fledged farming created a sustainable economy for the Norse and Icelandic settlers of Greenland. This warm period is known as the Medieval Warm Period (http://www.woodenboat.com/wiki/Medieval_Warm_Period) and just preceded the Little Ice Age (http://www.woodenboat.com/wiki/Little_Ice_Age) which ultimately led to the demise of the Norse colonies in Greenland. This fact, combined with persistent rumours of a Lost Ship of the Desert (http://www.woodenboat.com/wiki/Lost_Ship_of_the_Desert) (in California's Colorado Desert) variously described as a Viking longboat or a Spanish Galleon, has led some to conjecture that the Northwest Passage may have been not only navigable during this period, but indeed explored by Norse explorers.
The sea level (http://www.woodenboat.com/wiki/Sea_level) in the Arctic during the Medieval Warm period was different from that of the present day.[49] (http://www.woodenboat.com/forum/#cite_note-Spira_Solaris-48) Because of glacial rebound (http://www.woodenboat.com/wiki/Post-glacial_rebound) land levels of the land masses about the Northwest Passage have risen upwards of 20 m (66 ft) in the centuries after the Viking times.

huisjen
07-09-2009, 07:33 AM
Saga (mythologized) and conjecture versus ice core data. Hmmm. Which should I go with....?

Dan

The Bigfella
07-09-2009, 07:37 AM
and this site seems to think they did....

http://www.spirasolaris.ca/sbb4g1bv.html

The Bigfella
07-09-2009, 07:38 AM
Saga (mythologized) and conjecture versus ice core data. Hmmm. Which should I go with....?

Dan


Ice core data of what? The Northwest Passage? Got a link to that info?

WX
07-09-2009, 07:43 AM
There is no such thing as normal weather here

Peter, Have you noticed the firefly season has been starting earlier the last few years? Usually the start of September, now mid August.

huisjen
07-09-2009, 07:44 AM
I'm not doing your homework for you.

Dan

ahp
07-09-2009, 01:21 PM
Ice cores from the Greenland Ice Cap probably.

ahp
07-09-2009, 01:30 PM
Everyone knows, well all conservaties know, that Global Warming is a gigantic hoax perpetrated by an ultra secret, world wide conspiracy of tree hugers to take over the world and make us live in solar powered tepees, because it is good for us.

Bruce Hooke
07-09-2009, 01:46 PM
Before the Little Ice Age, the Vikings used to trade with the Inuits, around Ellesmere Island, Skraeling Island and Ruin Island - one would think that the Northwest Passage may well have been just as navigable.

I believe ice conditions have always been quite variable in different parts of the Northwest Passage. I believe it has long been fairly common for the eastern end (where the Vikings would have been) to open out in the summer a good bit. The most ice-bound sections are further west where Franklin's expedition met its end.

I put little credence in the idea that the Vikings explored very far west into the real Northwest Passage.

ishmael
07-09-2009, 03:23 PM
It's important to make a distinction between variations in weather and variations in climate. Two different animals. Because it's been an unusually cool and wet Spring and early Summer here in the NE US, I'll hear talk show hosts poo poo the notion of global warming.

What we've had is a bit off the peak of the bell curve, but not at all outside historical records, some of which date back to the mid-nineteenth century or even earlier. BTW. The thermometers and rain gauges those folks had were not significantly less accurate than ours. People were taking good measurements as early as first part of the eighteenth century.

http://inventors.about.com/library/inventors/blthermometer.htm

Tom Galyen
07-09-2009, 04:06 PM
80% die off by the end of this century? Rather glossy prediction isn't it? I predict that 99% of the people on this planet that were alive on Jan 1, 2000 will not see Jan. 1, 2100.

Here we had a colder than normal winter with more snow and rain, a late cool spring, and so far a cooler and wetter than normal summer. But we have been in a multi-year drought so the rain may still be less than normal but more than in the last 8 - 10 years.

Dan McCosh
07-09-2009, 04:22 PM
Record cold winter, cold, late spring, and rising lake levels.

john l
07-09-2009, 04:55 PM
the greenhouse effect in full exposure

High C
07-09-2009, 05:57 PM
it keeps changing,,hot in the summer, cold in the winter. I'm only 53 so it's always new.

I'm 200,052 and I'm starting to sense a pattern.

seanz
07-09-2009, 06:16 PM
Or 2100 even.

BUT Wait ---- Breaking News (http://www.google.com/hostednews/ukpress/article/ALeqM5hqJ8PlWPK1RaJKMqSyJhaw1UPRYQ)

And seriously depressing - look what happened to them.

:D

That was a genuine terribly tired typo, I meant 2100.......but what does a couple of centuries matter?

http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2009/jul/09/ashes-england-australia-first-test

S B
07-09-2009, 10:02 PM
Hell is freezing over, there is a 20 + degree C change here every day. Frost warnings by night/ sun spliting the rocks by day. We have changeable weather, but this is rediculous.

John B
07-10-2009, 12:35 AM
Do you know any Clarks SB, I have one coming here tonight.

Yeah , we were talking about this today.. winter here means settled weather for the pacific ( because its hurricane season up there in the islands in summer) yet the Noumea fleet got absolutely hammered 2weeks ago and an aquaintance of mine had to set off his epirb on way back from Tonga at the same time. Poor bugger , had to get off his boat after losing the rig and helm ,and they scuttled it.
This weekend its a very nasty system due here with 70 knots forecast ATM , but it has that look about it where it may well get worse( or not). Doubled lines went on this afternoon.

Krunch
07-10-2009, 04:41 AM
It's been pretty cool here so far this summer. I think it's about 59 F outside right now. Downright chilly.

But I'm sure it's just more "evidence" (just as glaciers advancing into NYC would be) of global warming.

Krunch
07-10-2009, 04:55 AM
80% die off by the end of this century? Rather glossy prediction isn't it? I predict that 99% of the people on this planet that were alive on Jan 1, 2000 will not see Jan. 1, 2100.

Jeez, and here I thought "free" health care was gonna allow us to live forever, or at least several hundred years...didn't they do that in "The Hobbit"?

Sing it with me: "Free! Forever! Yes we can! Free! Forever! Yes we can!" :D

(Personally, I'm sick of all this Politics of Mortality and Reality. It's all based on FUD. ) :mad:

S B
07-10-2009, 11:29 PM
Do you know any Clarks SB, I have one coming here tonight.

Yeah , we were talking about this today.. winter here means settled weather for the pacific ( because its hurricane season up there in the islands in summer) yet the Noumea fleet got absolutely hammered 2weeks ago and an aquaintance of mine had to set off his epirb on way back from Tonga at the same time. Poor bugger , had to get off his boat after losing the rig and helm ,and they scuttled it.
This weekend its a very nasty system due here with 70 knots forecast ATM , but it has that look about it where it may well get worse( or not). Doubled lines went on this afternoon.
I have one sitting on the sofa next to me,playing a video game.

isla
07-11-2009, 01:24 PM
Some moths, butterflies and bumble bees (such as Bombus Lapidarius) are definitely moving north. We are seeing Lapidarius quite regularly now in the north of Scotland, but twenty five years ago when we moved here they were virtually unknown north of the border. The border is about 180 miles south of where we live. General long-term trends are more significant than the notion of good summer/bad summer. Aberdeen University researchers say that spring has been earlier each year for at least ten years now. The time of emergence of certain flowers and insects provides good evidence of this.

TimH
07-12-2009, 01:17 AM
Thunder and Lightning out now....highly unusual. Pretty spectacular from out on the water though.

pipefitter
07-12-2009, 01:36 AM
No. We're still waiting (and paying for) for the hurricanes to gain frequency every year since the global warming caused season of 05. Our HO insurance rates are the only thing that has increased(nearly quadrupled in my case) though.

skuthorp
07-12-2009, 01:56 AM
Jeez, and here I thought "free" health care was gonna allow us to live forever, or at least several hundred years...didn't they do that in "The Hobbit"?

Sing it with me: "Free! Forever! Yes we can! Free! Forever! Yes we can!" :D


Just when they think they've located the secret of the Fountain of Youth on Easter Island too. (of course you know what happened to the population of Easter Island, overpopulation, over use of rescources and no trees left to build the voyaging canoes they came in originally to escape = extinction). Sound familiar?

PeterSibley
07-12-2009, 02:25 AM
Do you know any Clarks SB, I have one coming here tonight.

Yeah , we were talking about this today.. winter here means settled weather for the pacific ( because its hurricane season up there in the islands in summer) yet the Noumea fleet got absolutely hammered 2weeks ago and an aquaintance of mine had to set off his epirb on way back from Tonga at the same time. Poor bugger , had to get off his boat after losing the rig and helm ,and they scuttled it.
This weekend its a very nasty system due here with 70 knots forecast ATM , but it has that look about it where it may well get worse( or not). Doubled lines went on this afternoon.

That doesn't sound good at all ....the Oz / NZmap here is a bit of a worry .
http://www.oceanweather.com/data/

doorstop
07-12-2009, 03:55 AM
Back to a good old cold wet winter here... Just like the good old days of 7 or 8 years ago.

WX
07-12-2009, 06:31 AM
the Oz / NZmap here is a bit of a worry .
Water temp of 20-22c, that's a bit warm for this time of year isn't it?

bob winter
07-12-2009, 06:57 AM
Weather seems normal here. Rain for at least one day every weekend and sun in mid-week.

WX
07-12-2009, 07:00 AM
We actually had a normal winters day today. Beautiful sunny day with a temp in the low to mid 20C. We have had a wet year so far.

PeterSibley
07-12-2009, 07:06 AM
I was looking off Auckland ...9 metre waves to the North .

WX
07-12-2009, 07:15 AM
Hmm, 9 metres is big.

dmg
07-12-2009, 07:36 PM
I graduated from H.S. in '69. That year, my physic's teacher told me, that maybe in my lifetime, people would be coming NORTH for the winter ?

At the time, seemed pretty hard to swallow. But lately we've had more warm winter days than we used to, by far, and it seems the southern states have had more freezing temp's during our winter months ?

Dave

Mrleft8
07-13-2009, 07:58 AM
Our weather pattern changed the second Dingo left....It was rainy and cold the whole time he was here....Gone 3 days, and we've had 3 days of glorious sun and warm temps!:D

dm_scott
07-13-2009, 03:20 PM
it's been a cool late spring and cool summer here in Nova Scotia, but that's well within the bounds of natural variation, in other words, just weather....

might get some warmer weather later this year, as ENSO looks to be going into El Nino mode, but it's too early to tell yet, http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/elnino/nino-home.html

NW passage has been open, and navigated by boats before, and the north has been warmer than currently in it's past, but don't take my word for it, try some of the peer reviewed papers listed here. http://climatesanity.wordpress.com/2008/10/15/dont-panic-the-arctic-has-survived-warmer-temperatures-in-the-past/

Or try this one, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFMPP11A0203F

Or perhaps this one, http://esp.cr.usgs.gov/research/alaska/PDF/KaufmanAger2004QSR.pdf

John B
07-13-2009, 05:59 PM
I have one sitting on the sofa next to me,playing a video game.


Small world.

S/V Laura Ellen
07-13-2009, 06:28 PM
I wish our weather pattern was changing. It been cold and rainy too long, it's time for summer.

High C
07-13-2009, 06:38 PM
it's been a cool late spring and cool summer here in Nova Scotia, but that's well within the bounds of natural variation, in other words, just weather....

Right...weather and climate are two totally different things, no relationship whatsoever. I learned that on the WBF. :D

The Bigfella
07-13-2009, 06:48 PM
and, in late breaking news, it seems the weather in Phoenix is just like the weather in Oz...

from the wife, who is heading into the Grand Canyon today....



It is still very hot dry weather, just like our summer.