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ishmael
07-02-2009, 04:23 PM
This probably belongs in a boat section, but this is where the traffic is.

Getting ready to run the boat, and I've got two gallons of gas that have been sitting. I put a fuel stabilizer to it, but that was awhile ago. What to do with the gas? Two cycle, five horse, Nissan. Assuming I decide to dump it (that's how I'm leaning) who takes this kinda stuff?

Peerie Maa
07-02-2009, 04:26 PM
Is the tow vehicle gas or diesel?

A little at a time? Do you see where I am going?

High C
07-02-2009, 04:41 PM
....I put a fuel stabilizer to it, but that was awhile ago....

That's how fuel stabilizer works best, put in when the fuel is fresh. Some folks use it to try and rescue old fuel...bad idea.

How old is this fuel? I routinely use treated fuel that's a year or so old in my generator with no problem.

peter radclyffe
07-02-2009, 04:47 PM
That's how fuel stabilizer works best, put in when the fuel is fresh. Some folks use it to try and rescue old fuel...bad idea.

How old is this fuel? I routinely use treated fuel that's a year or so old in my generator with no problem.
whats a fuel stabilizer

High C
07-02-2009, 04:49 PM
whats a fuel stabilizer

It's a fuel additive that prevents gum formation and extends the life of the fuel.

I use Stabil.

http://www.goldeagle.com/brands/stabil/default.aspx

B_B
07-02-2009, 04:57 PM
old two cycle fuel goes into my vehicle (2003 Toyota Tacoma) gas tank - I've never had more than half a gallon or so, put in tank when 1/4 full then fill with regular.

I've had cars that burn more motor oil than that per mile :p;)

Bobcat
07-02-2009, 05:19 PM
Just burn it in a car and refill the gas tank for the outboard. Dilution is your friend. A gallon of gas-and-oil in a full car tank will just pass through the engine like a chili dog through a teenager...

Chris Coose
07-02-2009, 05:31 PM
Light your next brush fire with it.

bobbys
07-02-2009, 05:39 PM
I put old gas in old cans and when someone wants to "borrow" gas i give them the old gas and cans, They never bring the cans back anyways!!!

ishmael
07-02-2009, 05:41 PM
So put it in the car, a little at a time? I'm reluctant, but OK.

Canoeyawl
07-02-2009, 05:43 PM
Don't put it in your car...

Chris Coose
07-02-2009, 05:45 PM
I'd never do that.
How old is the gas?
How much do you drive?
What kind of container is it?
How full was the container in storage?
You can't take it back. It just isn't worth the risk.

Bobcat
07-02-2009, 05:53 PM
Don't put it in your car...


Why not?

John Smith
07-02-2009, 06:31 PM
Interesting question seems to fit here. How does the additive get water out of gas?

ishmael
07-02-2009, 06:39 PM
I'm not going to put it in my car. How old is it? Not sure, at least a couple of years. I can't remember the last time I ran this motor. Probably three year ago.

So, what do I do with it?

TerryLL
07-02-2009, 06:43 PM
Interesting question seems to fit here. How does the additive get water out of gas?

Basic principle is that the water is miscible in the additive, and the additive is miscible in the gas. The water doesn't actually get out of the gas, but is dissolved in the additive and then is burned in the engine.

On the larger question of what to do with old gas. I have always poured it into my vehicle, without any problem, and no evidence of smoke from the tailpipe. Remember, cars with bad rings can easily burn half a quart of oil per tank without any trouble.

donald branscom
07-02-2009, 06:44 PM
I put old gas in old cans and when someone wants to "borrow" gas i give them the old gas and cans, They never bring the cans back anyways!!!


I will think of what I could do to YOU..

donald branscom
07-02-2009, 06:46 PM
Interesting question seems to fit here. How does the additive get water out of gas?

It does not get water out. It just keeps it in suspension.That way it will not collect at the bottom of the tank and stop up an injector.

John A. Campbell
07-02-2009, 07:06 PM
This probably belongs in a boat section, but this is where the traffic is.

Getting ready to run the boat, and I've got two gallons of gas that have been sitting. I put a fuel stabilizer to it, but that was awhile ago. What to do with the gas? Two cycle, five horse, Nissan. Assuming I decide to dump it (that's how I'm leaning) who takes this kinda stuff?

Ish, am I understanding this right? You've got "an old 2-cycle Nissan marine engine"? I assume it's an outboard? If it's an inboard, I'd like to make you a really good deal ! I believe I would kill for a Palmer 6 hp "Baby Huskie" inboard in really good running condition.

StevenBauer
07-02-2009, 07:38 PM
The recycling center (used to be called the dump) takes hazardous materials on Saturdays in Portland. If you don't have something like that near you I'd try your local service station or ask the fire department. Sometimes they handle hazardous waste.


Steven

The Bigfella
07-02-2009, 07:41 PM
I've been known to use it as a weed killer.

ishmael
07-02-2009, 07:59 PM
I don't want to just pour it on the ground, though I've had that impulse. A recycling center sounds good, Steven. I'll make a few calls.

John,

It's an outboard, and I probably shouldn't worry it so much. I probably could burn this in it and not worry. A bullet proof motor. I haven't got past the break in period on it.

Bob Adams
07-02-2009, 08:02 PM
Put it in your car a half gallon at a time. Won't hurt a thing, and gives you a little upper cylinder lube as a bonus.

oznabrag
07-02-2009, 08:06 PM
John,

It's an outboard, and I probably shouldn't worry it so much. I probably could burn this in it and not worry. A bullet proof motor. I haven't got past the break in period on it.

Yeah, but if you've let it sit for two years, the gum and gunk you're worrying about is already in the carburetor/injectors. It may not run anyway.

bobbys
07-02-2009, 08:29 PM
I will think of what I could do to YOU...

I really put the mixed gas in my 78 chevy dump with a 350 and a Carb, not sure i would put it in the fuel injection car.

Krunch
07-02-2009, 08:36 PM
Put it in your truck. It'll burn just fine. I do it all the time, and with quantities larger and vintages older than what you're talking about.

John Smith
07-02-2009, 09:42 PM
I always disconnect hose at the dock and let the motor run till it stops.

Aside from water, via condensation, how does gas age?

There's lots of stuff to put into the gas to prevent gum and water. Does the gas make gum sitting in the tank, or is the gum something that is left in the carburator when the gas evaporates over time?

My motor's not broken in yet, either. Can't use it on my local lake. Almost hope there's no wind Wednesday when I take her to Barnegat Bay so I can put some time on the motor.

B_B
07-03-2009, 12:24 AM
I'm not going to put it in my car. ....So, what do I do with it?
put it in your car a little at a time - there is no technical reason not to.

nothing wrong with throwing it on the ground - IF - you want to kill something. Throwing it on the ground because you don't 'know' what to do with it is dumb.

B_B
07-03-2009, 12:32 AM
Aside from water, via condensation, how does gas age?
for some reason two stroke gas - i.e. petrol mixed with two stroke oil - does not work well after a period of time.

In spring I have to empty my lawnmower, weed whacker and used to have to clean out my outboard tank (bought new four stroke last year so need to worry about it) - the motors just would not start with the gas oil mixture sitting there for eight months.

b.t.w. all gas/petrol has a highly flammable/ignitable component which also evapourates really fast - the stuff that smells. This component is part of the gas/petrol formula to ease starting (it's not needed for running an engine) and is one reaon "winter" gas is different from "summer" gas - refiners provide differently forumaluted gas to the retailers depending on prevalent weather conditions.

There was a company, dont recall brand name etc., which marketed an 'emergency' gas canister that could safely store in your trunk. The idea was that if you ran out of gas you'd dump this into your tank and off you go - the caveat was that the engine needed to be warm otherwise this gas would not get your engine to start. That was how they got around the smell, the volatility and danger, of a gas canister in your trunk - less volatility, less smell.

John Smith
07-03-2009, 06:16 AM
for some reason two stroke gas - i.e. petrol mixed with two stroke oil - does not work well after a period of time.

In spring I have to empty my lawnmower, weed whacker and used to have to clean out my outboard tank (bought new four stroke last year so need to worry about it) - the motors just would not start with the gas oil mixture sitting there for eight months.

b.t.w. all gas/petrol has a highly flammable/ignitable component which also evapourates really fast - the stuff that smells. This component is part of the gas/petrol formula to ease starting (it's not needed for running an engine) and is one reaon "winter" gas is different from "summer" gas - refiners provide differently forumaluted gas to the retailers depending on prevalent weather conditions.

There was a company, dont recall brand name etc., which marketed an 'emergency' gas canister that could safely store in your trunk. The idea was that if you ran out of gas you'd dump this into your tank and off you go - the caveat was that the engine needed to be warm otherwise this gas would not get your engine to start. That was how they got around the smell, the volatility and danger, of a gas canister in your trunk - less volatility, less smell.
Thanks. I've certainly learned something.

bob winter
07-03-2009, 06:55 AM
I had this problem a couple of years ago. Mechanic told me just to throw it in the gas tank of the truck. Said it would cause no problems and it didn't. That gas was at least four or five years old and had a very interesting smell. Of course, there wasn't all that much of it.

John Smith
07-03-2009, 10:07 AM
You'l learn more if you walk out of the post office and back to the garage where the guys take care of the postal trucks.

summer gas...winter gas... you cant tell the difference for a car or a lawnmower untill you start comparing octane and racing fuel formulas...

ISH.... drink the stuff, according to these guys it's lost all of it's gasoline properties and might even make a decent additive to your post toasties in the morning.
I retired May 2000.

I don't know how I'd fit a job in today if I needed one.

It's amazing how many things the family finds for me to do. Between that and the weather, I had a hard time finding time to get the boat ready, and made some compromises that, hopefully, I can "uncompromise" later.

Canoeyawl
07-03-2009, 10:30 AM
Why not?


Your “car” has a computer controlled injection system.
(Unless you have an old flathead Ford, It is really sensitive and accurate)
This system relies on input data from several sensors that will change the timing and change the air-fuel ratio to suit the perceived conditions (This happens a hundred times a second or so).
If you want to try and “trick” them (the sensors) into thinking that you have the correct fuel in your car they will oblige and readjust to compensate.
So - if you don’t mind perhaps frying the catalytic converter or maybe swelling a piston a bit and wear a few years off because of the lean condition created because the O2 sensor thinks it’s running rich, Well, just go for it.
Those engine parts are cheap, why waste five bucks worth of gas?

UCanoe_2
07-03-2009, 09:53 PM
Send your old gas to me, and I will put it in my tractor.