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Dave Lesser
04-18-2009, 10:13 AM
http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/images/otx/photo_gallery/snow_rollers/SnowRolls09033102a.jpg

Very Interesting. More info here: http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/otx/photo_gallery/snow_rollers.php

Bruce Hooke
04-18-2009, 11:26 AM
Very cool!!!

cybulski
04-18-2009, 11:30 AM
thats wild, it makes me think of crop circles.

David W Pratt
04-18-2009, 11:57 AM
Neat!
I read an article once about rocks on a dry lakebed. They had skid marks behind them. At first people thought the got stuck in ice sheets, but they pounded in stakes next to them and they still moved.
It turns out that when it rains, the mud is very slippery, a gust of wind after/during a rainstorm can move the rocks.

Bruce Hooke
04-18-2009, 12:20 PM
Neat!
I read an article once about rocks on a dry lakebed...

Racetrack Playa near Death Valley, California. To the best of my knowledge, to date nobody has actually seen the rocks there move. It likely happens then the weather is really foul...rain and very high winds...and the playa is many miles back on a rough dirt road.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/82/Runningrock2.jpg/180px-Runningrock2.jpg

To see a larger version of this picture: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Runningrock2.jpg

Keith Wilson
04-18-2009, 03:51 PM
That is seriously weird; I've never seen anything even remotely like that. The article says it requires "light sticky snow" which sounds a bit like a kosher cheeseburger; light snow isn't normally sticky and sticky snow isn't normally light.

Shang
04-18-2009, 04:34 PM
Anyone ever heard of "rabbit ice"?
Late Autumn many years ago I was working on my grandfather's farm near Gravette, Arkansas. There was a lot of brush growing around the cabin where I was staying so I hacked it off with a bush-hook. Then I split and carried in an extra load of stove wood because it felt like the temperature was dropping as the sun went down and the air smelled frosty.
I got up before dawn the next morning, and stepped out onto the porch of the cabin...all around the cabin, where ever I had cut brush, there were white, frosty curlicues coming up from each of the weed stems. Most were only a few inches high, but a few were the size of heads of lettuce. I touched one and it crumbled silently. I stood on the porch looking at the frost-curls and drinking coffee, not wanting to step out into the yard and spoil any of the frozen curls. Then the sun came up and the frost disappeared within a few minutes.
Later when I described this to my grandfather he said that it was caused by the roots pumping water up the stems of the cut off plants, where it froze into delicate curlicues. He said the locals called it "rabbit ice."

Bruce Hooke
04-18-2009, 04:43 PM
That is seriously weird; I've never seen anything even remotely like that. The article says it requires "light sticky snow" which sounds a bit like a kosher cheeseburger; light snow isn't normally sticky and sticky snow isn't normally light.

I seem to recall seeing small (marble size) versions of this a few times. I'd guess that going from marble size to the scale shown in the photos would be a matter of having just the right conditions.

Bruce Hooke
04-18-2009, 04:44 PM
Later when I described this to my grandfather he said that it was caused by the roots pumping water up the stems of the cut off plants, where it froze into delicate curlicues. He said the locals called it "rabbit ice."

I've never seen it but it makes sense and sounds very cool!

Bob (oh, THAT Bob)
04-19-2009, 12:31 AM
Never seen'em but wouldn't doubt it, eastern WA is relatively flat, treeless, and windy.