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rufustr
04-12-2009, 04:17 AM
Britain's Got Talent.

If this doesn't make your day I'll be very surprised.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9lp0IWv8QZY

Hwyl
04-12-2009, 04:51 AM
You were right

LeeG
04-12-2009, 06:02 AM
she looks a little like my aunt. Ok,,that's when one gets teary eyed. thx

WX
04-12-2009, 06:16 AM
Wow, stun me with a brick!

Wild Dingo
04-12-2009, 06:28 AM
ABSOFRIGGINLUTELY BLOODY AWEFRIGGINSOME!!! :eek:

What a stunning voice! certainly took me by total surprise. :cool:

MiddleAgesMan
04-12-2009, 06:57 AM
"I knew we were in for something special the moment she set foot on the stage..." :)

Joe (SoCal)
04-12-2009, 07:46 AM
Wow what a way to start my day before Church on this Easter Sunday. THANK YOU SO MUCH for that link. Once in a lifetime moment.

I absolutely loved it, and Simon's scowl turned upside down was brilliant.

rufustr
04-12-2009, 07:47 AM
"I've never been kissed, that's not an advert.":D

Glad you liked it, I had tears the first time I watched it.:cool:

Joe (SoCal)
04-12-2009, 07:49 AM
Was so taken by here I had to read up more on her

SHE lives alone with her ten-year-old cat, has never been kissed, and is teased by children in the street. But 48-year-old Susan Boyle could just be the UK's next singing sensation.
Devout Catholic Miss Boyle has been at the centre of a media storm since news emerged of how she wowed Britain's Got Talent judges Simon Cowell and Piers Morgan with her amazing opera voice.

http://news.scotsman.com/entertainment/Talented-Susan-looks-to-have.5163658.jp

rufustr
04-12-2009, 08:02 AM
I read about her here.

http://www.news.com.au/couriermail/story/0,23739,25323731-5012980,00.html

SUSAN Boyle, a 47-year-old unemployed woman who hopes to be as famous as Elaine Paige, wowed the judges on Britain's Got Talent.
Susan stomped on to the stage looking dumpy in a gold dress.



She smilingly began clumsily gyrating her hips towards the judges, prompting laughter from the audience.

A smirking Cowell asked her who she would like to emulate - to which she replied Elaine Paige.
"I would love to be in musical theatre. I have just never had the opportunity," said Susan, who is from West Lothian in Scotland.

Paul Pless
04-12-2009, 08:05 AM
So very cool! She's awesome.

The British version Idol, seems to have more of those type of moments than does American Idol. Maybe something to do with Paula???

Remember this guy? cell phone salesman (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y703tPc4PRk)

TerryLL
04-12-2009, 08:11 AM
The tears were just streaming down my face. Truly an inspiration.

S/V Laura Ellen
04-12-2009, 08:33 AM
So very cool! She's awesome.

The British version Idol, seems to have more of those type of moments than does American Idol. Maybe something to do with Paula???

Remember this guy? cell phone salesman (http://www.tedbrewer.com/sail_wood/images/Tree-of-Life-sailing.gif)

Paul, check your link, I get a picture of a schooner.

Paul Pless
04-12-2009, 08:35 AM
thanks allan... its fixed.

NYCKiwi
04-12-2009, 08:39 AM
Wow, what an inspiration. My wife had tears in her eyes while we watched that. Many thanks for posting.

Mrleft8
04-12-2009, 08:46 AM
Who woulda thunk that Larry's sister was so talented! :D

S/V Laura Ellen
04-12-2009, 08:58 AM
Who woulda thunk that Larry's sister was so talented! :D

Can Larry sing opera?

Wild Dingo
04-12-2009, 09:04 AM
Can Larry sing opera?

Only on the banjo :D While guzzing white lightning ;) in the shower :D and only after breakfast never before ;)

Tom Montgomery
04-12-2009, 09:09 AM
Stunning. Inspiring. The voice of an angel.

Joe (SoCal)
04-12-2009, 12:05 PM
So very cool! She's awesome.

The British version Idol, seems to have more of those type of moments than does American Idol. Maybe something to do with Paula???

Remember this guy? cell phone salesman (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y703tPc4PRk)

OK ya got to stop with these I just came home from Church and I'm a freaking mess again. Aside from that being anouther remarkable performance it also happens to be my favorite aria from Puccini's Turandot. Yea the bald gap tooth chrome domed gnome likes Opera

Oh and FWIW that middle judge is FREAKING HOT !!!!!!!!!!! WHOA OooooFA :eek:

Upnorth1
04-12-2009, 12:17 PM
That was beautiful!

Yeadon
04-12-2009, 01:36 PM
... felt just like the well-executed end of a feel good movie.

If she'd walked out looking like one of the girls from America's Next Top Model, it wouldn't have been nearly as impressive.

Uncle Duke
04-12-2009, 03:09 PM
I would have watched the whole thing but I... uhmmm... got something in my eye.
Yeah - that's it - something in my eye...

Thanks, rufustr!

rufustr
04-12-2009, 05:19 PM
The clip was just shown on Morning Television here and I had extremely moist eyes again.

Bloody wonderful.

In the news article Joe posted it was incorrectly stated that Susan sang 'Cry Me a River', when she actually sang 'I Dreamed a Dream'.

One of my favorite songs of all time is Susan's idol Elaine Paige singing 'Cry Me a River' on the Parkinson Show a few years ago.

I hope Susan does that song at some time during this contest.

rufustr
04-12-2009, 05:36 PM
Joe,

The Female Judge is Amanda Holden, and I've had a crush on her from the moment I first saw her on television a few years ago.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uTOa4JZbweo

LeeG
04-12-2009, 06:50 PM
ok,,speaking of touching moments,,anyone know the scene in the cartoon movie Ratatouille when the food critic is served ratatouille? It's just as affecting.

David G
04-12-2009, 06:58 PM
That was an ice cream sundae of delight. Delightful persona. Delightful crowd response. Delightful feed back from the judges. And a double delightful voice. And with a cherry on top ;) My wife came into the office and wondered what the heck I was bawling about.

Thanks for sharing it!

boylesboats
04-13-2009, 02:11 AM
Who woulda thunk that Larry's sister was so talented! :D
Oh hell no, :D she ain't muh sister... nor my aunt, nor cousin.. She doesn't even have any Native American in her

Can Larry sing opera?
Are ya kiddin'? :D I can't sing worth a hound...

Only on the banjo :D While guzzing white lightning ;) in the shower :D and only after breakfast never before
Thank Dingo, you're almost right on that thar button.. guzzin' corn sweetened spirit, not once in the shower.. whistled Dixie after breakfast..
Just could not sing a lick anymore, but can carry few smokin' hot tunes on that ol' banjar..

Overall, the lady sure as hell surprised me with singing talent..

No, I am not related to Peter Boyle either..
Nope. not related to Lara Flynn Boyle, but by golly her birthplace is pretty close by...

There is a lot of Boyle that isn't related to me..

boylesboats
04-16-2009, 01:06 AM
<bump>

what? :confused:
Did I killed this thread?:eek:

David G
04-16-2009, 01:28 AM
I'm sorry, I think we were are afraid you'd burst into song... just to prove your point :eek:

rufustr
04-16-2009, 01:58 AM
No Larry, It's still going.

I keep getting emails with links to the site I posted at the top.

Don't these people know I found her first.

Over 11 million views so far.

BTW, her version stacks up extremely well against the professionals.:cool::cool:

rufustr
04-16-2009, 02:27 AM
From

http://coyoteprime-runningcauseicantfly.blogspot.com/2009/04/story-of-susan-boyle.html

(http://coyoteprime-runningcauseicantfly.blogspot.com/)

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

The Story of Susan Boyle (http://coyoteprime-runningcauseicantfly.blogspot.com/2009/04/story-of-susan-boyle.html)

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_oUc6WpOAwto/SeXqIzmolbI/AAAAAAAAH3Y/8Thl2QUvmJI/s200/From+Clipboard.jpg (http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_oUc6WpOAwto/SeXqIzmolbI/AAAAAAAAH3Y/8Thl2QUvmJI/s1600-h/From+Clipboard.jpg)"Susan Boyle's story is a parable of our age. She is a singer of enormous talent, who cared for her widowed mother until she died two years ago. Susan's is a combination of ability and virtue that deserves congratulation. So how come she was treated as a laughing stock when she walked on stage for the opening heat of Britain's Got Talent 2009 on Saturday night?


The moment the reality show's audience and judging panel saw the small, shy, middle-aged woman, they started to smirk. When she said she wanted a professional singing career to equal that of Elaine Paige, the camera showed audience members rolling their eyes in disbelief. They scoffed when she told Simon Cowell, one of the judges, how she'd reached her forties without managing to develop a singing career because she hadn't had the opportunity. Another judge, Piers Morgan, later wrote on his blog that, just before she launched into 'I Dreamed a Dream', the 3000-strong audience in Glasgow was laughing and the three judges were suppressing chuckles. It was rude and cruel and arrogant. Susan Boyle from Blackburn, West Lothian, was presumed to be a buffoon. But why?


Britain's Got Talent isn't a beauty pageant. It isn't a youth opportunity scheme. It is surely about discovering untapped and unrecognised raw talent from all sections of society. And Susan Boyle has talent to burn. Such is the beauty of her voice that she had barely sung the opening bars when the applause started. She rounded off to a standing ovation and - in her naivety - began walking off the stage and had to be recalled.


Susan, now a bankable discovery, was then roundly patronised by such mega-talents as Amanda Holden and the aforementioned Morgan, who told her: "Everyone laughed at you but no-one is laughing now. I'm reeling with shock." Holden added: "It's the biggest wake-up call ever." Again, why?


The answer is that only the pretty are expected to achieve. Not only do you have to be physically appealing to deserve fame; it seems you now have to be good-looking to merit everyday common respect. If, like Susan (and like millions more), you are plump, middle-aged and too poor or too unworldly to follow fashion or have a good hairdresser, you are a non-person. I dread to think of how Susan would have left the stage if her voice had been less than exceptional. She would have been humiliated in front of 11 million viewers. It's the equivalent of being put in the stocks in front of the nation instead of the village. It used to be a punishment handed out to criminals. Now it is the fate of anyone without obvious sexual allure who dares seek opportunity.


This small, brave soul took her courage in her hands to pitch at her one hope of having her singing talent recognised, and was greeted with a communal sneer. Courage could so easily have failed her. Yet why shouldn't she sound wonderful? Not every great singer looks like Katherine Jenkins. Edith Piaf would never have been chosen to strut a catwalk. Nor would Nina Simone, nor Ella Fitzgerald.


But then ridicule is nothing new in Susan Boyle's life. She is a veteran of abuse. She was starved of oxygen at birth and has learning difficulties as a result. At school she was slow and had frizzy hair. She was bullied, mostly verbally. She told one newspaper that her classmates' jibes left behind the kind of scars that don't heal. She didn't have boyfriends, is a stranger to romance and has never been kissed. "Shame," she said. Singing was her life-raft. She lived with her parents in a four-bedroom council house and, when her father died a decade ago, she cared for her mother and sang in the church choir.


It was an unglamorous existence. She wasn't the glamorous type - and being a carer isn't a glamorous life, as the hundreds of thousands who do that most valuable of jobs will testify. Even those who start out with a beauty routine and an interest in clothes find themselves reverting to the practicality of a tracksuit and trainers. Fitness plans get interrupted and then abandoned. Weight creeps on. Carers don't often get invited to sparkling dinner parties or glitzy receptions, so smart clothes rarely make it off the hanger. Then, when a special occasion comes along, they might reach, as Susan did, for the frock they bought for a nephew's wedding. They might, as she did, compound the felony of choosing a colour at odds with her skin tone and an unflattering shape with home-chopped hair, bushy eyebrows and a face without a hint of make-up. But it is often evidence of a life lived selflessly; of a person so focused on the needs of another that they have lost sight of themselves. Is that a cause for derision or a reason for congratulation? Would her time have been better spent slimming and exercising, plucking and waxing, bleaching and botoxing? Would that have made her voice any sweeter?


Susan Boyle's mother encouraged her to sing. She wanted her to enter Britain's Got Talent. But the shy Susan hasn't been able to sing at all since her mother's death two years ago. She wasn't sure how her voice would emerge after so long a silence. Happily, it survived its rest. She is a gift to Simon Cowell and reality television. Her story is the stuff of Hans Christian Andersen: the woman plucked from obscurity, the buried talent uncovered, the transformation waiting to be wrought. It is wonderful for her, too, that her stunning voice is now recognised. A bright future beckons. Her dream is becoming reality.


Susan is a reminder that it's time we all looked a little deeper. She has lived an obscure but important life. She has been a companionable and caring daughter. It's people like her who are the unseen glue in society; the ones who day in and day out put themselves last. They make this country civilised and they deserve acknowledgement and respect. Susan has been forgiven her looks and been given respect because of her talent. She should always have received it because of the calibre of her character."


- http://www.theherald.co.uk/search/display.var.2501746.0.
the_beauty_that_matters_is_always_on_the_inside.ph p

Susan Boyle's incredible performance: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9lp0IWv8QZY

Posted by CoyotePrime at 7:06 AM (http://coyoteprime-runningcauseicantfly.blogspot.com/2009/04/story-of-susan-boyle.html)

bamamick
04-16-2009, 02:45 AM
O.k.. Number one, I thought that she did a splendid job and deserves all the credit in the world for 'going for it', as it were. The whole point of those shows is for people to believe that everyone has that one tiny glimmer of hope to shine like Paul Potts or Susan Boyle.

I NEVER watch the singing show here, whatever it is called, but I do know that folks from that show have pretty much taken over mainstream radio here in the States. It's all pretty generic. Pretty voices. Pretty faces. For some reason it is hard for me to believe that a Susan Boyle would ever make it to that show in my country. Are we too shallow to give someone like her a chance? Maybe. Probably.

Number two, she was doing an imitation of the cd version of 'Les Miz' from the Broadway or London stage (the same one I have heard my kids singing to for the past 15 years), and she was doing a pretty good one. The voice inflection was right on. One wonders how she would do without that guidepost to follow, but please don't think I am putting her down. I am very, very pleased for her. Takes a hell of a lot of courage to go from taking tea with your cat to standing up in front of a television audience and doing your thing. I can't imagine, personally.

Hopefully she'll get a smooch from someone out of this.

Mickey Lake

Larks
04-16-2009, 03:54 AM
Thanks Rufus, I missed this when you first posted it but it is wonderful. Something wrong with the link though, 'seemed to fog up my screen a bit....I'm looking forward to seeing how her path follows Paul Potts.

Cedric Rhyn
04-16-2009, 05:04 AM
Now, wouldnt a duet with Potts and Boyle be interesting,

Cedric


Thanks Rufus, I missed this when you first posted it but it is wonderful. Something wrong with the link though, 'seemed to fog up my screen a bit....I'm looking forward to seeing how her path follows Paul Potts.

Tealsmith
04-16-2009, 06:39 AM
Goes to show, you shouldn't judge a book by its cover.

ron ll
04-16-2009, 10:26 AM
Okay, Susan Boyle's story is a real heart warmer and she deserves the best. HOWEVER, I seem to smell something fishy here. First there was the Paul Potts auditions, the first one of these I saw and it totally blew me away.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1k08yxu57NA

Then a few months later came the Neal Boyd audition

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=179Mqa1HHe8

and I started getting a little suspicious. Now we have Susan Boyle. This format is starting to look too canned. Anyone else think these might be a little less than "reality" TV?

TomF
04-16-2009, 12:12 PM
Nope Ron - I think it's just reality TV.

I've sung in amateur shows with a handful of people who can deliver a song every bit as well as Susan Boyle etc., and some who can do it better. There are many truly talented people out there who for one reason or another don't want go into the business professionally, or haven't been able to put it all together when they've tried.

Maybe they love some other work more; maybe they don't want the lifestyle ... or their spouse doesn't. Maybe like a mezzo I sang in opera workshops with, they love the music ... but really want kids more than a career's travel demands. Maybe like Ms. Boyle, they've been a caregiver for an aging parent etc., and put something ahead of their own wants.

Or maybe there's some hiccup in their technique, or a musicianship problem that's not immediately obvious. Hell, I've got at least as good a singing voice as Susan myself ... but I'm not singing for a living for a bunch of reasons. Notably, in my early 20s I couldn't overcome a couple of technique hitches in my high range. Low range has always been like dark chocolate.

One of my singing teacher's other students had a simply stunning, enormous, heroic baritone voice, and a gloriously free technique. He'd been an athlete, model, and a Theater major in University too, so he looked the part and could act. Give him a big (and obvious) song, and your jaw would drop.

He was as sensitive as a brick.

In something quiet or reflective, interpretively he was completely lost. Painfully lost. And even with years of twice-weekly coaching sessions, he never learned to read music easily. That torpedoed his possible career ... though he was given 3-4 stunning opportunities (e.g. a wealthy patron paid his tuitions/living expenses for 2 years).

This kind of show would be ideal for him ... would disguise all his weaknesses, and let his enormous gifts shine. Last I heard, he'd finally given up singing ... had acted in a "Gain" pet food commercial, and was working off-and-on as a substitute high school teacher. And singing solos with a local men's choir.

Go to the final concert of the music festival in a fair sized town, and you'll hear a bunch of young people with enormous promise ... who may or may not ever do it for a living. But could rock people silly given the right circumstances in a talent competition.

ron ll
04-16-2009, 12:34 PM
Tom I agree with you on that. What smells fishy to me is that the format of all three of these was so similar, even to the point of Paul Potts and Neal Boyd sang the same song. And the surprise and tears of the judges in all cases just seems to be canned. I have no doubt there are thousands of ordinary folks that can sing well. But I think these "talent" shows are finding a few of these people, frumping them up and packaging them for the "surprise". If you compare the youtube videos of all three, they are remarkable similar.

TomF
04-16-2009, 12:46 PM
Maybe so. The shows are "entertainment," and I'm sure the producers and the judges each know that contrast makes for good drama.

One thing that I personally hate about these "audition" programs, is that they'll profile the humiliatingly awful contestants too. Both the absurdly terrible performances, and the scathing comments from judges. I think that some of those instances must be staged too - can't imagine anyone aching to be publicly whipped otherwise.

Lots of decently trained tenors will take a crack at "Nessun Dorma" though. Pavarotti popularized it to the point that it's probably the most familiar tenor aria for people who aren't too into Opera, and familiarity's always good if you're trying to win over an audience.

Glen Longino
04-16-2009, 12:49 PM
Let me at Susan's eyebrows with my tweezers, will you Please !!

ron ll
04-16-2009, 01:08 PM
Lots of decently trained tenors will take a crack at "Nessun Dorma" though. Pavarotti popularized it to the point that it's probably the most familiar tenor aria for people who aren't too into Opera, and familiarity's always good if you're trying to win over an audience.

When I first heard the Paul Potts audition I was bowled over with emotion. So I immediately dug out my Pavarotti version of it for a comparison. Pavarotti's version was SO much more powerful and emotional that it made Potts really seem like amateur hour. But the emotion that the Potts version drags out of us is more due to the contrast and the backstory than to the quality of the performance. And as you say, the producers know this. Which is why they are yanking our strings all the way to the bank. And if it worked with Potts, why not try it again with Boyd and then Boyle?

Glen Longino
04-16-2009, 01:18 PM
When I first heard the Paul Potts audition I was bowled over with emotion. So I immediately dug out my Pavarotti version of it for a comparison. Pavarotti's version was SO much more powerful and emotional that it made Potts really seem like amateur hour. But the emotion that the Potts version drags out of us is more due to the contrast and the backstory than to the quality of the performance. And as you say, the producers know this. Which is why they are yanking our strings all the way to the bank. And if it worked with Potts, why not try it again with Boyd and then Boyle?

Exactly!
Anybody watch "Dancing With The Stars"?
Stars? Dancing? It's all about production and hype.
If I had their promotion budget, I could sell 100 kayaks a year instead of 2.

TomF
04-16-2009, 01:44 PM
When I first heard the Paul Potts audition I was bowled over with emotion. So I immediately dug out my Pavarotti version of it for a comparison. Pavarotti's version was SO much more powerful and emotional that it made Potts really seem like amateur hour ... Which is a great segue into the next thing about these shows that makes me angry.

Paul Potts singing Nessun Dorma is amateur hour.

As someone once said to me, an amateur is celebrated because they can make a glorious sound - for having a fabulous instrument. But that's just the entry qualification for the pro. They're expected to have a fabulous voice ... it's how well they can use it as a tool that gets them work.

Virtually all the professional tenors starring in productions in the world's mid-level opera houses have voices at least as good as Paul Potts, and have twice his interpretive capacity. That's their job, and they've taken Potts' raw materials, and worked hard with them for years to become really skilled. If we were interested in the artistry, we'd be listening to them. Not to Paul Potts ... Where's the TV show of a competition among actual working professionals, say for a Met contract, or a Broadway lead? Or just a weekly celebration of what some of these people can actually do - without it being a nail-biting "vote-somebody-off" competition?

These amateur talent shows aren't really about the art - the singing, the dance etc. Most working professional dancers are at least as good as the "So you think you can dance" finalists ... same's true of most working professional singers. The shows are about audiences projecting themselves and their own dreams onto the stage. Now, it's not a bad thing to recognize and celebrate talent ... but there's a reason that the professionals are, well, professional.

Most of us could probably draw a moderately competent picture of a boat ... and with practice, we'd get fairly good at it. That doesn't make us the equal of a boat designer, let alone one in Herreshoff's league ...

boylesboats
04-16-2009, 02:44 PM
Let me at Susan's eyebrows with my tweezers, will you Please !!

Her brows? :eek: that ain't all...

Remember now.. she haven't been kissed or dated.. :eek:

Glen Longino
04-16-2009, 04:55 PM
Her brows? :eek: that ain't all...

Remember now.. she haven't been kissed or dated.. :eek:

I'm not surprised, are you?:rolleyes::)
But botebum would hit it !:eek::)

oznabrag
04-16-2009, 05:34 PM
But botebum would hit it !:eek::)

When is ol' Pinky comin' back aboard, anyway?

John T

Glen Longino
04-16-2009, 05:44 PM
When is ol' Pinky comin' back aboard, anyway?

John T

I'm worried about that scamp!
Dingo Shane said in another thread that botebum was laid up in a whisky funk, while his Tanya had fled to Dallas, of all places.
I hope he doesn't make me go hunt him down and straighten him out. But if I have to, I will.

oznabrag
04-16-2009, 05:50 PM
I'm worried about that scamp!
Dingo Shane said in another thread that botebum was laid up in a whisky funk, while his Tanya had fled to Dallas, of all places.
I hope he doesn't make me go hunt him down and straighten him out. But if I have to, I will.

I might come with you!

On the other hand, if he's on a whiskey drunk, I might 'go native' on you!:D

Glen Longino
04-16-2009, 05:56 PM
I might come with you!

On the other hand, if he's on a whiskey drunk, I might 'go native' on you!:D

Well, in that case, let's just find Tanya in Dallas, and to hell with botebum! It's a lot shorter trip to Dallas!:rolleyes::)
Seriously, does anybody know what's up with botebum?

oznabrag
04-16-2009, 05:59 PM
Well, in that case, let's just find Tanya in Dallas, and to hell with botebum! It's a lot shorter trip to Dallas!:rolleyes::)
Seriously, does anybody know what's up with botebum?


Wasn't there some sorta noise that he actually made it to Houston before the job 'imploded'?

Maybe he got stuck there or something.

Glen Longino
04-16-2009, 06:09 PM
Wasn't there some sorta noise that he actually made it to Houston before the job 'imploded'?

Maybe he got stuck there or something.

I don' know, but I think the poor devil should be let out of jail so he can explain himself to us before we have to get on the road and hunt him down.

Glen Longino
04-16-2009, 06:15 PM
What's defiled?
What's denigrated?
Conversations grow and branch in all directions without harm or loss to anybody.
Lighten up!:)

oznabrag
04-16-2009, 07:15 PM
What's defiled?
What's denigrated?
Conversations grow and branch in all directions without harm or loss to anybody.
Lighten up!:)

I think he was talking about the cynics.

Glen Longino
04-16-2009, 07:22 PM
I think he was talking about the cynics.

Duh! Thanks John T!:o:)

rufustr
04-16-2009, 09:14 PM
I wasn't going to comment on the cynics, but I think you are missing the point by analyzing the performance.

Just accept it for the feel good success it is.

A rank amateur will never compare technically with a trained professional.

No one can compete with Pavarotti.

Carreras and Domingo don't when it comes to Nessun Dorma.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O0Sx5lbVlQA

TomF
04-17-2009, 09:27 AM
It's good to know one can always come to the bilge to find something which is nothing but good, and see it denigrated and defiled.

What a classy group you are!
Makes you feel right at home, eh Donn?

Who's denigrating Susan Boyle's performance? What I saw was a suspicion that the audience had been manipulated by the producers - but only praise for Boyle's great amateur singing.

My problems with the show's premises say nothing about Boyle - but a fair bit about the show's audiences.

ron ll
04-17-2009, 10:20 AM
Tom's right, I don't have a complaint with her singing or, what I think I called her heartwarming story. Good on her. But the first one of these I saw was Paul Potts. It dragged me in and I watched it over and over and sent it to friends. Then a few months later I saw the video of Neal Boyd. It was so amazingly similar to the Paul Potts video that I got a little suspicious. Now comes the latest in the form of Susan Boyle. Watch all three audition videos and then tell me you think this is just Aw Shucks Reality.

stevebaby
04-17-2009, 11:10 AM
I don' know, but I think the poor devil should be let out of jail so he can explain himself to us before we have to get on the road and hunt him down.Put a bounty on his sorry arse, say a six-pack, and I'll hunt him through the fires of Hades.
Could probably form a decent posse for that sort of prize actually.

oznabrag
04-17-2009, 01:34 PM
Put a bounty on his sorry arse, say a six-pack, and I'll hunt him through the fires of Hades.
Could probably form a decent posse for that sort of prize actually.

Whatya got against Pinky?

John T

Another One
04-17-2009, 07:32 PM
The clip was just shown on Morning Television here and I had extremely moist eyes again.

Bloody wonderful.

In the news article Joe posted it was incorrectly stated that Susan sang 'Cry Me a River', when she actually sang 'I Dreamed a Dream'.

One of my favorite songs of all time is Susan's idol Elaine Paige singing 'Cry Me a River' on the Parkinson Show a few years ago.

I hope Susan does that song at some time during this contest.

Sorry if this has been posted in the interim, but here's the link to Susan Boyle's 1999 charity recording of Cry Me a River:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i5ETPG26ALE

stevebaby
04-17-2009, 09:27 PM
Whatya got against Pinky?

John TNothing personal...I'm thirsty.

rufustr
04-17-2009, 10:41 PM
Sorry if this has been posted in the interim, but here's the link to Susan Boyle's 1999 charity recording of Cry Me a River:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i5ETPG26ALE


Thanks for that link.

I didn't know about that.

Bloody wonderful again.:cool:

mmd
04-20-2009, 08:19 AM
Another young Brit with talent. A friend sent me this link:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yVU4IkzMNIo

Lew Barrett
04-20-2009, 10:19 AM
I had thought not to post my observations about Susan Boyle because so many had derived pleasure from her performance that to critique her would ruin the real reason she came to the fore. Moreover, I never felt I needed her performance to verify the fact that the British produce great art and great achievements. Indeed, they do and I have no desire to argue with the premise of this thread.
Yet the tiny fracas in the teapot raised by the drop in poster has brought me out of my coma in this regard.

As I think Ron implied, I too sensed a lack of integrity on the part of the producers of this show in respect to this choice. That lack of integrity has been my impression long before Susan Boyle took the stage for her fifteen minutes, though. I'm delighted for her nonetheless. Yet, in an odd way, I believe she is being used, and I could, with a bit of critical thought of my own, easily mistrust their motives. All of us should be so lucky as to have a moment to bask in the limelight, and get the benefit of a recording contract (or whatever they give her) that could change our financial status as well. But in my view, she won precisely because she is frumpy and seemingly "over the hill." It's my supposition that she wasn't picked solely on the basis of her talent, but precisely because the producers predicted the response this would have on the mass audience and played with precision to it. I actually find such a possibility more than a bit cynical myself. The judges, on the few occasions I have watched them, have always seemed mercurial, cruel and strangely disconnected from the objects of their review. Here they have taken the heartwarming, "ain't we sweet?" approach to make a surprise announcement about someone we were expected to find unlikely. I view it as a device.

Just one point of view, as I certainly don't wish to seem a heartless cad. And, equally, I have always thought the British were an exceptionally talented lot, long before Susan Boyle, who as it turns out, has a very lovely face and an exceptionally fine demeanor, whatever the actual quality of her singing might be when compared to truly professional standards.