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View Full Version : Fastening Strips for Interor Cabin Paneling



jhermanski
04-07-2009, 08:16 AM
I'm redoing the inside of my cabin and am replacing an old rubber/plastic liner on the hull sides with 1 1/4" wide strips of ash.

I'm trying to avoid screwing them down. The strips are too thin (5/32") to countersink and bung the hundreds if screws that would be needed.

I've experimented with contact cement. It *might* work. But given the curve of the hull and the roughness of the inner hull surface (fiberglass mat) I don't get a good bond all the way along the strip. One possibility is to work some other sort of glue (polyurethane?) down into the areas that show a gap after each strip is attached with contact cement.

Trying to set up jacks/braces for each strip to "clamp" it in place while an epoxy or polyurethane dries doesn't seem like a great option. Way too time consuming.

Does anyone have any ideas that might help me here?

Thanks,

John

paladin
04-07-2009, 10:33 AM
If you are attaching directly to the fiberglass......I would rethink the process....I would use eqally spaced blocks of 1 x 2 epoxied to the hull in such a way that you can bend the ash strips (prefinished) around the inside of the hull...I would tend to use pieces about 1 inch wide and possibly 1/4 to 5/16ths thick, then use a brass cupped washer and #6 screws to secure the strips. I would also use a thin strip of aluminum as a temporary spacer between the ash strips, perhaps 3/32 inch thick to create a breathing space between the ash strips. I would also install a solar vent fan with a small hose in the bilge, to pull air through the boat, into the bilge, and out to keep the place well ventilated.

jhermanski
04-07-2009, 01:05 PM
Interesting idea. Getting the strips up off the lumpy matting would avoid troubles with getting the edges aligned and glue failure.

Generally, my cabin has been pretty dry. But, wood of any sort does prefer air circulation to sitting in a swamp. And, nice light-colored ash does turn interesting shades of green, brown and black when microbes start growing on it.

The only down side I can see is I'm still looking at rows of screws. And I'd have to do more work to refit the old teal trim pieces that trim off the bulkheads that the ash would run between.

I'd also use a thinner mounting strip - 1/2" or so, as I don't want to eat into already narrow V-berths.

But, all in all, I like the idea. Thanks.