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cat_duh_maran
04-06-2009, 05:37 PM
Just caught the beginning of NBC Nightly and while talking about the breakaway of the Wilkins Ice Shelf they showed the image of a polar bear crossing ice on the screen behind Brian Williams. Arctic comes from the Greek meaning "bear". Antarctic means "no bears". Looks like they need to reorganize their stock footage racks. Do Eskimos eat penguins too?:rolleyes:
Bruce

Captain Intrepid
04-06-2009, 05:46 PM
They're a bunch of knumbskulls.

Btw, for your edification and since this is an international board, please keep in mind that the term Eskimo is considered a pejorative in some countries. :) I'm sure that's not the case here, but in some english speaking country's it's rather offensive.

Peerie Maa
04-06-2009, 05:48 PM
It's like I keep telling Tinman, just tomorrows chip wrappers.:p

The media news is one of the most ephemeral things there is. No time to get it right before the next disaster comes along.

cat_duh_maran
04-06-2009, 05:52 PM
As it turns out the story talked about both poles so I guess they didn't really goof.
You are correct about the Eskimo bit but I was having a brain fart at the time and couldn't think of the word Innuit(sp?)
Bruce

Phillip Allen
04-06-2009, 06:26 PM
They're a bunch of knumbskulls.

Btw, for your edification and since this is an international board, please keep in mind that the term Eskimo is considered a pejorative in some countries. :) I'm sure that's not the case here, but in some english speaking country's it's rather offensive.


I have only recently herd that...looks like it might be just another PC witch hunt (bet they're planning on suing the makers of Eskimo Pies)

Captain Intrepid
04-06-2009, 06:29 PM
I have only recently herd that...looks like it might be just another PC witch hunt (bet they're planning on suing the makers of Eskimo Pies)

Naw, it's been like that for years.

goodbasil
04-06-2009, 06:46 PM
Innuit is what the Innuit call themselves. Means, "People of the deer."
Eskimo is what the southern natives, what Columbus called Indians, called the Innuit. Means, "Eaters of meat."
Indian, is what Columbus called everyone who was on the land he is credited with discovering, since he thought he was in India.
East Indian is what we call people from India so as not to confuse them with our missnamed aboriginanals.
Indians are what people in India call themselves. There is no such thing as an East Indian.
We need more coffee coloured people.
( I wish something would happen in my life so that I had something interesting to post.)

Flying Orca
04-06-2009, 07:03 PM
Innuit is what the Innuit call themselves. Means, "People of the deer."

Er, no. Inuit simply means "the people". "People of the deer" would be something like Tuktumiut, in the same way that "people of the seal" are Netsilingmiut, but the Caribou Inuit didn't use that term for themselves as near as I can tell. Most of the Caribou Inuit I know would be descended from, or consider themselves to be, Qaernemiut or Hanningajurmiut.

My family is known colloquially as the Saqvaqjuamiut. :D

Tinman
04-06-2009, 07:21 PM
Flying Orca, you are a far better linguist than I am, I have trouble with english and spelling it correctly, never mind inuit.

Flying Orca
04-06-2009, 07:27 PM
I use reference material where necessary. ;) But I did also grow up speaking Inuktitut.

Tinman
04-06-2009, 08:46 PM
For some reason I had it in my head that you where american..But if memeory serrves you are from or in Winnipeg?

B_B
04-06-2009, 09:00 PM
For some reason I had it in my head that you where american..But if memeory serrves you are from or in Winnipeg?
You shouldn't rely on your memory - just look at the top right hand side of the individuals profile
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Bonehunter
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Winnipeg MB
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Flying Orca
04-06-2009, 09:29 PM
For some reason I had it in my head that you where american..But if memeory serrves you are from or in Winnipeg?

Nick, I was born in New Hampshire, but my family moved to Canada before I turned one year old. Canadian roots on my mother's side, her parents were PEI Scots who moved down to New England, but it was a position at U of T (teaching with the promise of arctic research) that brought my family to Canada.

(edited: Sorry, meant to add that I ended up in Winnipeg and have lived here for over twenty years.)

Duncan Gibbs
04-06-2009, 10:52 PM
I'm what they call in South East Queensland (where I work) a Mexican: I live in Northern New South Wales, South of the border....

I feel a song coming on... Where's my hard liquor!??? :D

ljb5
04-06-2009, 10:59 PM
Arctic comes from the Greek meaning "bear". Antarctic means "no bears".

I really don't think the ancient Greeks knew about polar bears. I'm quite certain they didn't know about the absence of bears in the south.

The bear referred to in the word άρκτος (arktos) is what we call the Big Dipper... not a real bear.

WX
04-06-2009, 11:01 PM
Flying Orca, have you read a book called Kabloona?

Duncan Gibbs
04-06-2009, 11:09 PM
I really don't think the ancient Greeks knew about polar bears. I'm quite certain they didn't know about the absence of bears in the south.

The bear referred to in the word άρκτος (arktos) is what we call the Big Dipper... not a real bear.

Use of an ancient Greek word is for name places is somewhat different from the ancient Greeks actually knowing about the place that their words are being used for. The Romans certainly didn't have modern taxonomic principles for the classification of species when they struck up conversations in Latin did they? ;)

cat_duh_maran
04-06-2009, 11:09 PM
I really don't think the ancient Greeks knew about polar bears. I'm quite certain they didn't know about the absence of bears in the south.

The bear referred to in the word άρκτος (arktos) is what we call the Big Dipper... not a real bear.It comes from bear not polar bear and was used when the area was named. Don't be stupid. It's not becoming.
Bruce

Flying Orca
04-06-2009, 11:20 PM
I really don't think the ancient Greeks knew about polar bears.

I wouldn't be too sure of that. I think overland trade even in those days was capable of carrying both stories and parts of polar bears south from the Arctic Ocean to the Mediterranean.


Flying Orca, have you read a book called Kabloona?

Rings a bell, and I can picture it, but if I ever read it it was thirty years ago. Seems to me my folks knew the author, though.

ljb5
04-06-2009, 11:42 PM
It comes from bear not polar bear and was used when the area was named. Don't be stupid. It's not becoming.

It refers to the constellation which we refer to as the Big Dipper, but which was also known as Ursa Major, or "the Big Bear."

Ursa Major is near the star Polaris and is a common navigational tool for finding the direction north.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arctic


The word Arctic comes from the Greek αρκτικός (arktikos), "near the Bear, arctic, northern"[1] and that from the word άρκτος (arktos), which means bear [2]. The name refers to the constellation Ursa Major, the "Great Bear", which is prominent in the northern portion of the celestial sphere.

Got it now? It has nothing to do with the actual habitat of any real bears. It's a navigational direction.

Yeadon
04-07-2009, 12:04 AM
I'm familiar with the Inuit ... but didn't realize the pushback against the word Eskimo. Interesting, and good to know.

This had never even crossed my mind, but then, I've never lived up that way.

B_B
04-07-2009, 01:50 AM
Flying Orca, have you read a book called Kabloona?
is that "klaboona to the arctic"?
if so, lady needed a 'chaperone'.

cat_duh_maran
04-07-2009, 11:26 AM
Here's a good source for the book- http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?sts=t&tn=Kabloona&x=39&y=16
Bruce

Popeye
04-07-2009, 11:37 AM
I'm familiar with the Inuit ... but didn't realize the pushback against the word Eskimo.

and now you do ..

WX
04-08-2009, 07:33 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kabloona

Excellent read.

Popeye
04-08-2009, 07:36 AM
thanks for this wx:


Poncins was not a scientist and did not study the Inuit from a scientific perspective. Rather, he provides his own stylized personal points of view and descriptions of Inuit life. In the book, he is initially disparaging of the Inuit way of life, seeing it as primitive and often using the description "cave man". Indeed, a clear theme of racial superiority, described in terms of innate intelligence and physical appearances, and cultural superiority in terms of morals and ethics pervades the first part of his work. As the book progresses and his hardships in the harsh Arctic environment take their toll (at one point Poncins runs 1400 miles behind a dogsled (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dogsled)), he begins to find a new appreciation for the Inuit way of life, for their intelligence and resourcefulness, and experiences to a spiritual awakening; ultimately reaching a point where he discovers that he himself has become so well adapted to the Inuit way of life that he is no longer a "Kabloona" and has become one of them.

Flying Orca
04-08-2009, 08:55 AM
Hmm, I'm thinking of a different book I believe.

Peter Malcolm Jardine
04-08-2009, 09:00 AM
Ever since I invoked the ignore feature on Tinny, life has much less stupidness in it.:)

Popeye
04-08-2009, 09:07 AM
nah , i enjoy watching people put their foot in it