PDA

View Full Version : lead pot explosion



Phillip Allen
02-16-2009, 12:16 PM
I'm too old and too experienced to have been this careless...I failed to preheat the ingot mould before I poured molten bullet metal into it out of the pot. there was obviously a small damp spot in the mould even though it looked dry.

http://i136.photobucket.com/albums/q196/phillipdallen/leadpotexplosion001.jpg

Uncle Duke
02-16-2009, 12:19 PM
Thank goodness for luck, eh? Seriously - don't do it again!!!!

CK 17
02-16-2009, 12:19 PM
i'm glad you were wearing glasses. a mask may have helped further, but they tend to cause the glasses to fog, don't you think?

Jim Ledger
02-16-2009, 12:20 PM
Glad you're OK, Phillip. That could have been much worse.

Phillip Allen
02-16-2009, 12:25 PM
I had a big gob of lead up my nose...gonna be tender around there for a few days

Paul Pless
02-16-2009, 12:33 PM
Does this count as a gun safety thread?

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
02-16-2009, 12:37 PM
I worked with a man who owned a finely honed sense of self deprecation, and whenever he made a silly mistake he would say:

"Life's hard when you're an idiot"

He had a point.

seanz
02-16-2009, 12:37 PM
You Idjit!


Timely reminder to be more careful, glad you weren't badly hurt etc.


So, when you reach a certain age.....your pimples go grey too?
:)

TomF
02-16-2009, 12:38 PM
Glad you're mostly OK, Phillip!

Peerie Maa
02-16-2009, 01:29 PM
Did that myself when I was about thirteen casting fishing weights. Was not wearing glasses though. You were very lucky.
Stay careful.

htom
02-16-2009, 01:40 PM
Ouch! Glad you're mostly OK -- heal fast and well, please.

Nanoose
02-16-2009, 01:45 PM
Ouch!, and what PISN said in #7 (hehehehehehehe :D :D :D)

paladin
02-16-2009, 01:47 PM
Hey...try that with a pair of side cutting dykes and a 240 volt wire pair.......copper melts right into the glasses.....

Canoeyawl
02-16-2009, 01:55 PM
You're a lucky man.
It's a good thing it wasn't 500 lbs...
If you read carefully Chapelles Boat Building, he advises you to wet down well your mold before pouring the molten lead.
Whoa!

willmarsh3
02-16-2009, 02:20 PM
I'm really glad it wasn't worse. I read somewhere here before that someone tried to cast iron pigs using a section of angle iron as a mold. The angle iron was rusty and had moisture in it even though it appeared dry. Big mistake.

pila
02-16-2009, 02:41 PM
The glasses certainly saved the eyes. Great to hear it's not a super painful lesson.

Popeye
02-16-2009, 02:43 PM
I had a big gob of lead up my nose...

a least it wasn't a double barrel

bamamick
02-16-2009, 02:57 PM
I am so glad that your eyes weren't injured. I have gotten into the habit of wearing safety glasses when I do things like cut the yard now. I have been wearing them at work for about 30 years now, so I can certainly wear them at the house when doing anything that endangers my eyesight.

A faceshield may even be better?

Mickey Lake

Peter Malcolm Jardine
02-16-2009, 04:06 PM
Wearing a full safety mask is probably in order... lucky Philip... ;)

Lew Barrett
02-16-2009, 04:08 PM
Glad you're Ok, hot shot! That spec of lead in front of your eye that the glasses caught is surely the scariest one.

rufustr
02-16-2009, 04:17 PM
Wearing glasses has helped save my eyes on a few occasions too.

They do come in handy at times.

thank you for the reminder.

PeterSibley
02-16-2009, 04:17 PM
I've been extrapolating this to my 2 ton lead keel !!!!EEEEEEEEkk!

Glad you're OK Phil .:)

The Bigfella
02-16-2009, 04:34 PM
Glad you are OK Phillip.

Domesticated_Mr. Know It All
02-16-2009, 05:20 PM
The look on your face is priceless.
I couldn't help laughing but I'm glad it wasn't worse.

Tom Galyen
02-16-2009, 05:24 PM
I would not go out and buy a lottery ticket any time soon, as I think you've used up your quotient of luck for a while. :)

I glad you're alright.

Tom G. (Seaweed)

rddrappo
02-16-2009, 05:27 PM
Glad you're ok. Better luck next time!

Hughman
02-16-2009, 05:48 PM
Jeez, Philip. How come you're not smiling in that photo?

Phillip Allen
02-16-2009, 05:53 PM
well...I'm smiling now

(My granddaughter was here (10 yo) and it still was hurting quite a bit...but I thought you guys would like to see my slightly cooked face so I had her snap the pic before I cleaned up)
:)

BrianW
02-16-2009, 05:57 PM
So glad it wasn't worse!

Guessing that now there's little red marks on your skin, where it's silver in the photo?

Phillip Allen
02-16-2009, 05:59 PM
not red yet...it was a flash burn (pun intended)...I had enough lead up one nostril to make a small caliber bullet...


practice gun...ah...lead safety

Memphis Mike
02-16-2009, 06:02 PM
Those weren't "nice bullets" you were making.:p

CAPNBIL
02-16-2009, 06:05 PM
On the subject of eye safety I caught a 5 foot length of PVC pipe right in the eye about a month ago when raising my sailboat in its lift. Got distracted while the lift was going up and one of the guide tubes caught under the I beams above - bent and bent and then snapped sending it to me like a javelin. My glasses lens didn't break but popped out and the frame cut me above and below the eye - 5 stitches above and 5 more below but the eye survived. I think someone above was trying to get my attention.

Phillip Allen
02-16-2009, 06:15 PM
On the subject of eye safety I caught a 5 foot length of PVC pipe right in the eye about a month ago when raising my sailboat in its lift. Got distracted while the lift was going up and one of the guide tubes caught under the I beams above - bent and bent and then snapped sending it to me like a javelin. My glasses lens didn't break but popped out and the frame cut me above and below the eye - 5 stitches above and 5 more below but the eye survived. I think someone above was trying to get my attention.

scary stuff when you "look" back at it, ain't it

hokiefan
02-16-2009, 06:16 PM
Phillip, glad you weren't seriously injured.

Would you mind if I used that photo for a safety meeting at our plant? Its a good example of the value of eye protection, even at home. If you'd rather I didn't, no problem.

Thanks,

Bobby

Phillip Allen
02-16-2009, 06:19 PM
Phillip, glad you weren't seriously injured.

Would you mind if I used that photo for a safety meeting at our plant? Its a good example of the value of eye protection, even at home. If you'd rather I didn't, no problem.

Thanks,

Bobby

sure, go ahead. That's why I put it up here. the "Pop" came from about a foot in front of me and about two and a half feet below my eyes...the cast iron ingot mould appeared dry and clean

George Ray
02-16-2009, 07:16 PM
Glad your OK!

Thanks for sharing a story that we all can learn from.
http://lh4.ggpht.com/_ODS_xL2q7J8/R2Em_kAQ9oI/AAAAAAAAAFw/WR96u6DrIOM/s400/is_00225.jpg

Bob Adams
02-16-2009, 07:31 PM
Hey...try that with a pair of side cutting dykes and a 240 volt wire pair.......copper melts right into the glasses.....

Been there,done that, got the t shirt.

Thank God you had your glasses on Phillip!

Mrleft8
02-16-2009, 09:33 PM
Kinda reminds me of a Texas lawyer that went dove hunting with VP Cheney..... But the lead in that instance was moving a lil bit faster....

PatCox
02-16-2009, 10:16 PM
Close calls are scary. I was out walking one day, in the late fall, a crisp cold day, in a local Wildlife Management Area. Even in New Jersey, the state with a higher population density than India, has designated hunting areas, not parks, just State land thats kept undeveloped and wild so wildlife can live there and hunters can hunt there, all together, its more than all our parks put together. Its the closest thing to "wilderness" we got.

So I was just hiking around, looking for stuff, and I hear an occasional gunshot in the distance, you almost always do, and I am in an open area where I am visible from some distance.

And then I felt a bullet go by my head. Don't remember the gunshot, because the puff of air that ruffled my hair just slightly, and this soft sound, a "whirring" noise, I actually thought, "was that bullet tumbling?", that was strange.

I know that was a bullet. I would be interesting if anyone else can tell me more information about it feels and sounds like to have a bullet nearly miss you. But from everything about it, I am utterly convinced a bullet missed me by inches.

Strange feeling. I dropped to the dirt and started hollering at the top of my lungs, to make the shooter aware I was there.

PatCox
02-16-2009, 10:18 PM
Oh my God, I just realized something, is that something that guys in combat have to hear and experience all the time, the actual sound of bullets passing close by? Oh crap, like what I felt but constantly?

Dayyum, never really really understood what that would be like.

watson1990
02-16-2009, 10:30 PM
Phillip,
I hope [ and i know ] that you realize just how lucky you are !!
If The very smallest tid bit of lead had hit your eye ,your eye would have melted and you would be blind for the rest of your life !
I know that I am stating the obvious .. just looking,,,,again ,at your picture ,i realize how very very fortunate you are ..some one was watching over you and it wasn't big brother ..Say a prayer ,in what ever form you like ,,,but say a thank you prayer and spread the news ..and perhaps you should buy 2 lottery tickets ...you have some kinda MOJO working on your side !!
Watson

Mrleft8
02-16-2009, 10:44 PM
I had a big gob of lead up my nose...gonna be tender around there for a few daysYou Idiot! Yer s'posed to SMOKE the lead, not SNORT it! ;)

Shang
02-16-2009, 10:49 PM
In addition to the burn scars on my hands from rescuing a flag burned by ill-advised friends in the 'sixties, I have lead-burns from exploding toy soldiers in my ill-supervised childhood.
Bonne chance, Phil.

Ransom Cadorette
02-16-2009, 11:26 PM
So I get the basic idea, but what is it that is on your face and depending on what it is doesn't it hurt?

Michael Beckman
02-16-2009, 11:31 PM
So I get the basic idea, but what is it that is on your face and depending on what it is doesn't it hurt?

Its the molten lead, which cooled down and solidified using his face as the heat sink.

johnw
02-17-2009, 01:40 AM
Ouch.

Won't do that again, I betcha.

Glad you were wearing the glasses.

Spin_Drift
02-17-2009, 01:52 AM
Phillip, I'm so glad you wear glasses and didn't lose your eyesight.

It's scary how close you came to losing your sight for a mistake like that.

So sorry for you getting burned, yet so glad it wasn't worse.

Put some Aloe Vera and vitamin E on the burns (2-3 times a day) and they will not scar.

Hope you heal soon....

.

Rational Root
02-17-2009, 03:30 AM
I know that was a bullet. I would be interesting if anyone else can tell me more information about it feels and sounds like to have a bullet nearly miss you. But from everything about it, I am utterly convinced a bullet missed me by inches.

Strange feeling. I dropped to the dirt and started hollering at the top of my lungs, to make the shooter aware I was there.

If he only missed by inches.... did it occur to you that maybe he already knew you were there, and he was just a poor shot ?

Phillip Allen
02-17-2009, 03:37 AM
If he only missed by inches.... did it occur to you that maybe he already knew you were there, and he was just a poor shot ?

the whirring suggests a ricochet and therefore the shooter was unaware of him...maybe some of our combat vets know better...I was just a sailor

Rational Root
02-17-2009, 03:47 AM
Damn you were lucky.

Glasses are not safety goggles.

Those glasses are at least nice a BIG, early 80s style:D, if they had been smaller, some lead might have gotten past them. Ricochet off your eye socket.... you get the idea.

WEAR GOGGLES, pay for prescription goggles if glasses + goggles fog up. Also remember that plastic lens in typical glasses are not designed to deal with high speed spinning things that shatter.

But you know this, don't you.

Glad it was a gentle wake up call.

It sucks to read about other guys (or girls) on the forum getting broke up.

Phillip Allen
02-17-2009, 03:50 AM
I always get real glass lenses...they are unmarked still

Paul Pless
02-17-2009, 05:29 AM
the whirring suggests a ricochet and therefore the shooter was unaware of him...maybe some of our combat vets know better...Chuck knows ;)

David W Pratt
02-17-2009, 08:39 AM
Retiring the glasses to a place of honor in the shop would be a nice reminder.
Safety first.
Glad you're OK.

LeeG
02-17-2009, 09:26 AM
Hey Phillip, I'll say what Lew said to me when I visited him.."I thought you'd be younger"...funny, I imagine your general appearance but with dark hair.

Glad you didn't get it worse.

Phillip Allen
02-17-2009, 09:47 AM
Hey Phillip, I'll say what Lew said to me when I visited him.."I thought you'd be younger"...funny, I imagine your general appearance but with dark hair.

Glad you didn't get it worse.

My hair is always much darker after I have been playing with fire :)

Popeye
02-17-2009, 10:08 AM
i had lead 'blow' back at me when i was a lad

we were setting iron pipe in a cement wall using hot lead , i guess a little moisture caused the lead to blow back , got a scar on my arm , just missed my face and eyes

Phillip Allen
02-17-2009, 10:09 AM
i had lead 'blow' back at me when i was a lad

we were setting iron pipe in a cement wall using hot lead , i guess a little moisture caused the lead to blow back , got a scar on my arm , just missed my face and eyes


yep...actually a steam expolsion

Paul Denison
02-17-2009, 10:19 AM
Most rifle rounds are supersonic and make a very loud "crack" sound as they pass by. A whirring noise would suggest a slow tumbling bullet.

Phillip Allen
02-17-2009, 10:35 AM
I heard a couple of rounds hit about twenty feet over my head once...I was down in a hollow for that very reason. They had slowed down enough to be subsonic...THE SHOOTER HAD NO IDEA WHERE HIS BULLETS WERE GOING

think "gun safety"...you own that bullet(s) 'till it comes to a safe stop

John of Phoenix
02-17-2009, 11:14 AM
Phillip, that's the kind of stuff that's turns you gray. You're one fortunate fella.

Pat, a full fledged bullet makes a supersonic "crack" then a whizzing sound as it goes past. Yours was likely a spent round or ricochet. Still potentially deadly though. More gray hair stuff. Another fortunate fella.

Phillip Allen
02-17-2009, 11:19 AM
John...that is one of the reasons I stopped hunting on public land...too many pitiful publics from town out there

Glen Longino
02-17-2009, 12:31 PM
I waited this long to look at this thread because the title suggested a scary disaster.
I'm very glad it was no worse than it was.
No point now in telling you to be careful.:)

Concordia...41
02-18-2009, 07:07 PM
Wow! I've been off-line. Glad you're ok. :(

And thanks for a reminder that a lot of us need.

- M

Bill Griffin
02-18-2009, 08:18 PM
I just got around to opening this thread. You are very lucky Philip. As mentioned earlier, I too have taken to wearing protective gear for home projects. We're about to have a safety stand down here at work, due to a fatality in Florida. I'd like to use Philips photo as a reminder that not all the dangers we face are at work.

Pat, as mentioned, likely a ricochet or spent round. Also, as happened to me not too long ago, I was buzzed by a ruby throated hummingbird. It was deer season and he must have been migrating. Was close enough to ruffle what hair I have left, and reminded me of some spent iron! at first. But then he came back and I saw what was up. (I hear they are quite territorial)

skuthorp
02-18-2009, 08:27 PM
I still have scars on my legs from splashes of type metal from an old 1925 model linotype that I worked as an apprentice. You had to listen carefully to the bu**er to tell when the mould was misaligned. The safety mechanism was fast reactions, oiled chair castors and a big leather apron. You learnt quickly never to stand directly behind an operator.
Knew a bloke who lost his eyelids with a pot explosion too. Narrow escape you had there mate!

Phillip Allen
02-18-2009, 08:33 PM
I just got around to opening this thread. You are very lucky Philip. As mentioned earlier, I too have taken to wearing protective gear for home projects. We're about to have a safety stand down here at work, due to a fatality in Florida. I'd like to use Philips photo as a reminder that not all the dangers we face are at work.

Pat, as mentioned, likely a ricochet or spent round. Also, as happened to me not too long ago, I was buzzed by a ruby throated hummingbird. It was deer season and he must have been migrating. Was close enough to ruffle what hair I have left, and reminded me of some spent iron! at first. But then he came back and I saw what was up. (I hear they are quite territorial)


you're welcome to use the pic...

Bill Griffin
02-18-2009, 08:48 PM
Thanks, Phil

tapsnap
03-01-2009, 08:51 AM
I had the same thing happen to me only in bronze - much hotter. A rather inexperienced guy called me in to the casting shop at the last second to help pour a large crucible of bronze. He had his mold and all the ingots lined up but had not preheated them. We poured the mold without problems but when we went to pour the excess into the ingots, one after the other, they exploded on us. It was like the 4th of July - molten metal flying all over the place. We had leathers on and a face shield but some metal went down the back of my neck and rolled down my back and was held by my belt at my waistline until we finished pouring. I still have the scars 15 years later.
It wasn't steam that caused the explosion in my opinion . The ingot molds were welded sheet steel. When they were hit with the hot metal they contorted so violently, so quickly that they just spat out the metal. Always preheat your ingot molds! Cast iron ingot molds do not suffer from this problem so much. But you are right, moisture is a big no-no in casting metals.