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Phillip Allen
02-03-2009, 11:00 PM
I assume a fireplace insert but I'm not limited to that...I can even add a flue if I need to...

I just got through looking online at the stuff available and most looks cheezy to me but is very over priced at the same time...something that should cost about 1K or less sells for four times that...marketed to housewives and such...

I can make one but need a design to start with

rbgarr
02-03-2009, 11:21 PM
Swap sheets often have used ones for sale, but good luck with a design.

pila
02-03-2009, 11:26 PM
Some folks I know of have an outside attached room with a wood burning hot water furnace, which supplements the main gas fired furnace. I guess that would depend on the availability of low priced firewood.

Glen Longino
02-03-2009, 11:30 PM
Look at wood stoves, Phillip.
I use three in my house, 4,200 square feet, no telling how many cubic feet.
If you have a good source of dry wood it works. keep your fireplace to look at and woodstove to heat.
I could use propane but I don't like to pay for it and I don't like the smell.

BarnacleGrim
02-04-2009, 12:41 AM
I'm guessing you already have electric heating?

Kaa
02-04-2009, 01:08 AM
Fireplaces are highly inefficient at heating houses. If you actually want to heat your house with firewood, I would strongly recommend a stove rather than a fireplace.

Kaa

Ron Williamson
02-04-2009, 06:22 AM
A small stove snuck into that fireplace would be pretty cozy.
I had a local weldor build one for about $300,IIRC.
A piece of stove pipe is slid up to or through the damper and packed tight with rock wool.
R

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
02-04-2009, 06:32 AM
Fireplaces are highly inefficient at heating houses. If you actually want to heat your house with firewood, I would strongly recommend a stove rather than a fireplace.

Kaa

They are, however, magnificently effective ventilators - asses your needs with care.

Oyvind Snibsoer
02-04-2009, 07:56 AM
Install a quality air-air heat pump. They're not too much of an investment these days, and have become very good.

huisjen
02-04-2009, 08:02 AM
I want to build myself some of these.

http://www.northerntool.com/images/product/images/456302_lg.gif

http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_6970_200328805_200328805

Dan

Canoez
02-04-2009, 09:09 AM
This is to augment your heat exchanger for really cold days?

I noticed in a picture that it appeared you have not finished your floor - how about some radiant tubing to an on-demand gas-fired water heater for when it is really cold. Do you have enough floor thickness to allow for something like that? A relatively inexpensive solution.

Otherwise, for the number of cold days that you have, a good woodstove works marvels and is much more efficient than an open fireplace. There are some nice models of woodstove inserts that would fit in your fireplace.

Paul Pless
02-04-2009, 09:19 AM
buy boat
find copacetic female companionship
sail south

:D

TerryLL
02-04-2009, 09:23 AM
Wood stove. I haven't been without one for the past 25 years and three different houses. They work just fine when the power goes down for days on end. My current stove, A Yotul cast iron, heats the whole house to 75 when its 5 below outside. Saved enough on my gas bill this winter to buy a new chainsaw.

stevebaby
02-04-2009, 09:30 AM
Burn your house down again, claim the insurance again, then move to Cuba.

Gary E
02-04-2009, 09:31 AM
buy boat
find copacetic female companionship
sail south

:D

Soooooo... that's your plan...
Fix the ladies Owens and head down river together ... :)

Paul Pless
02-04-2009, 09:34 AM
Soooooo... that's your plan...
Fix the ladies Owens and head down river together ... :)pretty much ;) :)

Canoez
02-04-2009, 09:35 AM
Wood stove. I haven't been without one for the past 25 years and three different houses. They work just fine when the power goes down for days on end. My current stove, A Yotul cast iron, heats the whole house to 75 when its 5 below outside. Saved enough on my gas bill this winter to buy a new chainsaw.

Excellent point.

I had a Jotul Oslo at my last house that I loved. Burned cleanly and efficiently.

Phillip Allen
02-04-2009, 09:40 AM
Soooooo... that's your plan...
Fix the ladies Owens and head down river together ... :)

boats exist, Gary...copacetic female companionship does not!

Phillip Allen
02-04-2009, 09:42 AM
I'm thinking an insert but so far they are ugly...I can make one out of plate but would rather not

Canoez
02-04-2009, 09:52 AM
I'm thinking an insert but so far they are ugly...I can make one out of plate but would rather not

http://www.jotul.com/FileArchive/Photos/Wood%20inserts%20(USA)/J%C3%B8tul%20C%20450%20Kennebec/Int/C450_Tamarack_int.jpg

in the eye of the beholder.... :)

R.I.Singer30
02-04-2009, 09:52 AM
I had this Quadro Fire as my insert .It did a pretty good job of heating the 2300 sq ft house.I Had to clean it every year though. They put some catalytic type of reburners in it that slowed the burn towards the end of the season.

http://www.quadrafire.com/images/photos/products/wood_inserts.jpg

huisjen
02-04-2009, 10:08 AM
Phillip, have you considered insulation and weatherstripping as a first step?

Dan

paladin
02-04-2009, 11:05 AM
Just a caution to those folks that use the hot water thru the floor trick of heating the house......that's the system they use in Iceland...superheated steam comes from the volcano and is stored as superheated water in large tanks outside of Reykjavik...then the hot hater is pumped underground under the roads and into a system of diverter valves outside each house, then the thermostat allows water to circulate through the floors of the house.
Icelanders have had some serious problems the last 20 years or so involving leg and knee/ankle joint disieases/problems......they traced it to the floor heat...a little research will give a better answer....

S.V. Airlie
02-04-2009, 12:59 PM
Umm, first thought.. a iive in girlfriend. Ya don't have to marry her but there is nothing like a little body heat Phillip..:rolleyes:

katey
02-04-2009, 01:29 PM
I would second Dan's comment about insulation and weatherstripping. No matter what heat source you go with, you're paying every winter to fuel it. Money and time put into insulation and weatherstripping last forever.

eta: and if you don't want a woman, how about a large, friendly dog?

Phillip Allen
02-04-2009, 01:41 PM
Phillip, have you considered insulation and weatherstripping as a first step?

Dan

workin on that as well

David G
02-04-2009, 02:12 PM
Ground-source heat pump for heating/cooling. Not cheap to put in, but very efficient. Second choice, a regular (air-source) heat pump.

Wood stove for backup. We have an oldie in the basement that'll keep the whole house warm in a snowstorm, when the power goes out - esp. since we put in the new Pella double-glazed windows.


"One kind word can warm three winter months" -- japanese proverb

Phillip Allen
02-04-2009, 02:19 PM
I'm not looking to replace a brand new 4.5 ton heat pump...I'm looking to cheat a bit...with wood

S.V. Airlie
02-04-2009, 02:46 PM
I'm not looking to replace a brand new 4.5 ton heat pump...I'm looking to cheat a bit...with wood

A live-in weighs less and takes up less room. Eats less too!:rolleyes:

Phillip Allen
02-04-2009, 04:28 PM
A live-in weighs less and takes up less room. Eats less too!:rolleyes:


nope...what's left of my sanity is important to me (unless she's got a 40 foot tops'l schooner and is less that 40 years old with movie star dimensions...the woman and not the boat...also must be able to hold an intelligent conversation...that's the clincher) (send pic of boat)

katey
02-04-2009, 04:32 PM
Jamie, are you trying to tell us something?

David G
02-04-2009, 05:17 PM
I'm not looking to replace a brand new 4.5 ton heat pump...I'm looking to cheat a bit...with wood

Gotcha. The wood stove will be more efficient. Inserts have come a long way, though.

Peter Malcolm Jardine
02-04-2009, 05:25 PM
You could light yourself on fire, but it's temporary..:D

Kaa
02-04-2009, 05:27 PM
You could light yourself on fire, but it's temporary..:D

It will keep you warm for the rest of your life, though... :D

Kaa

Phillip Allen
02-04-2009, 06:05 PM
If you think I'm gonna carry a torch for you, you need to move to San Francisco :)

huisjen
02-04-2009, 06:12 PM
Fuel, current price per unit, BTU per unit, aprox. fuel use efficiency, kBTU/$
Oil, 2.40, 139k, 82%, 47.5
Propane, 3.50,91k, 92%, 23.9
Electric, .18, 3412, 100%, 19
Electric heat pump, .18, 3412, 300%, 57.
Wood Pellets, 290, 13.6m, 78%, 36.6
Wood, 250, 18m, 75%, 54.

These are approximate numbers. Price will vary with region. For wood, BTUs will vary with species. Fuel efficiency will vary with stove or appliance. Higher final numbers are better. Heat pump efficiency varies considerably.

Dan

BarnacleGrim
02-04-2009, 06:56 PM
I'm on the lookout for a non-ugly insert myself, preferably a corner model. I'm sick of carrying so much wood to keep the fire going, without even getting much heat in the room.

For all other wood heating needs, you just can't go wrong with a good old cast iron Jøtul.

Rigadog
02-04-2009, 09:06 PM
Get a whole bunch of animals, bring them inside.

seafox
02-06-2009, 03:52 PM
Mr Allen
I would sugest going to backwoods home magizine web sity and search for an artical by David Lee on chimneys. his system of heating basicly consists of surounding the wood stove with a high mass of stone you fire it once or twice a day and the mass stores the heat for release. best place is the basement. I heat something like this with a wall a concrets blocks on two sides of the stove that creates a fuil bunker next to the stove. another great idea davic lee has is a two story closet with one door outside upstairs and another to the inside in the basement. Mr Lee writes that it takes about 45 minutes to load a cord of wood in the closet from the outside where he pulls up in his truck and since he loads so much at a time he can puck good weather to do it the 4 or 5 times a year he needs to. I am tired of packing wood down the stairs.
Mr Lee's chimney he says is about 23 tons and is in the center of the house and helps suport the main and second floors.
good luck
ps I have about 20 concrete blocks and it does benifits. my next stove I home to build out of a 100 t0 250 gallon ex propane tank to be able to take larger wood pieces since 1 foot long is the best size for my stove whichj is a front loader

SMARTINSEN
02-06-2009, 04:58 PM
http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/3318/2271/320/Vue-poele1.1.jpg


What seafox said:


You are a mason, build a Finnish fireplace. The mass of the warmed up bricks helps to keep the place warm. I have not researched this, but here is a link for information:
http://openfireplaceshowroomsinglasgow.co.cc/finnish-fireplace-construction/

One of our neighbors builds (for the rich and famous) this type of chimney and fireplace out of soapstone.

Phillip Allen
02-06-2009, 07:01 PM
I agree that masonry mass is what works...I am not going to alter my house that much though...I'm just looking to help it along a little and on the cheap at that

looks like some kind of insert will happen. I don't like it but it makes the most sense from my perspective

Shang
02-06-2009, 07:11 PM
I assume a fireplace insert but I'm not limited to that...I can even add a flue if I need to...

I just got through looking online at the stuff available and most looks cheezy to me but is very over priced at the same time...something that should cost about 1K or less sells for four times that...marketed to housewives and such...

I can make one but need a design to start with

Phil... Check your email.

seafox
02-07-2009, 12:28 PM
Mr Allen
the title of the artical I was trying to quote is " better wood heating" by David Lee. in backwoods home Mag.
best wishes
jeff

paladin
02-07-2009, 08:30 PM
Yore lookin in the wrong place Phillip.....Inuit wimmin's is cheap, plentiful...no arguments, blubber keeps you warm....the downside may be the urine tanned leather cloths that they wear, especially in warmer weather.

Phillip Allen
02-07-2009, 08:54 PM
Yore lookin in the wrong place Phillip.....Inuit wimmin's is cheap, plentiful...no arguments, blubber keeps you warm....the downside may be the urine tanned leather cloths that they wear, especially in warmer weather.


you wouldn't want to kiss em...they chew that leather "tastes like muktuk"