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View Full Version : Brick Labourer in Bangladesh...



Spin_Drift
12-08-2008, 01:55 AM
This guy is amazing... Absolutely incredible strength and balance...

:eek:


http://s202.photobucket.com/albums/aa111/Spin_Drift/Movies/?action=view&current=BrickiesLabourerinBangladesh.flv


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Captain Blight
12-08-2008, 02:00 AM
Think of how many times he had to do that before he made it look as effortless as he does. I'm bigger than most and strong, too; but pound for pound, he has me beat completely hollow. Strong as an ant, I reckon, and doing it on a bowl of rice with a couple fish eyes in it.

Where can I hire this guy?

PeterSibley
12-08-2008, 02:39 AM
Get him a Green Card and pay him $1000 per week .

LeeG
12-08-2008, 03:33 AM
oh jeez he can't last long, that's gotta be 1.5 times his body weight unless it's light stuff

WX
12-08-2008, 05:32 AM
So much for OH&S...bet he gets paid stuff all as well.

Syed
12-08-2008, 05:45 AM
I guess, it is piece rate contract. Very tough indeed, imagine the climate.

WX
12-08-2008, 05:48 AM
No thanks. Last Saturday here was so humid it was like breathing under water.

PeterSibley
12-08-2008, 06:13 AM
and all that one diet of rice and daal .Who needs meat for strength eh ?

The Bigfella
12-08-2008, 06:25 AM
You guys all have conditioned minds - he's the business owner

Shang
12-08-2008, 10:50 AM
At one of the hill-stations in India I saw a porter loaded up with six or seven, full five-gallon oil cans, that's somewhere in the neighborhood of two hundred and fifty pounds. Two other guys pulled him to his feet, pointed him up the mountain and gave him a pat on the back to get him started. The porter couldn't stop or sit down until he had reached the next station, nearly ten miles up a steep mountain road.
This guy's legs were about the size of baseball bats, and looked about that hard.
I was told that the life-span of hill porters was less than forty years.

Spin_Drift
12-08-2008, 01:27 PM
At one of the hill-stations in India I saw a porter loaded up with six or seven, full five-gallon oil cans, that's somewhere in the neighborhood of two hundred and fifty pounds. Two other guys pulled him to his feet, pointed him up the mountain and gave him a pat on the back to get him started. The porter couldn't stop or sit down until he had reached the next station, nearly ten miles up a steep mountain road.
This guy's legs were about the size of baseball bats, and looked about that hard.
I was told that the life-span of hill porters was less than forty years.


That's really something. Would you have some pictures by any chance? I for one, would love to see.....

PeterSibley
12-08-2008, 04:25 PM
I've had the same thing told to me by friends who have trekked in the mountains up there .Not just men ,women porters too .Carrying firewood so Western tourists can have hot showers...they insist you know .

ahp
12-08-2008, 08:04 PM
There have been metabolic tests done on African women. They can carry huge loads on their heads without an increase of metabolism.

Concordia...41
12-08-2008, 08:12 PM
I just hope the guy is in a no wake zone! :eek:

PeterSibley
12-08-2008, 08:18 PM
There have been metabolic tests done on African women. They can carry huge loads on their heads without an increase of metabolism.

Does that still apply when they come to the USA ?

J. Dillon
12-08-2008, 09:00 PM
Wow , :) That's using your head.;)

JD

Pernicious Atavist
12-08-2008, 09:37 PM
We've all seen those "World's Strongest Man" contests...some of these Oriental guys put those weightlifters to shame.

Spin_Drift
12-09-2008, 04:59 PM
I bet his vertebrae will suffer from the weight... :eek:

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Shang
12-09-2008, 10:36 PM
I wish I'd gotten pictures of the hill porters, but I didn't.

Also missed photographing the guys with the hardest jobs in the world...
There was a new highway being built around New Delhi. Large rocks were delivered to the job site by ox cart, these were broken into smaller rocks by men with sledges, and then into gravel by women with small hammers. The gravel was spread with rakes, then came the hard work.
Asphalt was melted in fifty-five gallon drums over a wood fire, the molten asphalt was ladled into five-gallon cans...and guys balanced these redhot cans on their heads as they marched down to the end of the road and poured the asphalt over the freshly-spread gravel. They did this all day.
It was mid-summer with the daytime temperature was around a hundred and ten degrees.

(When I returned a year later the road construction had advanced about half a mile.)

Mad Scientist
12-09-2008, 11:02 PM
That looks completely crazy to most of us, but I'll suggest that it is a perfect example of the adaptability of us humans.

Case in point...I am reminded of one of my schoolteachers from India - she wore a sari every day, and in the winter she wore Stanfield's long johns underneath (one of the other students asked; that's how I know).

Tom

Spin_Drift
12-09-2008, 11:45 PM
I wish I'd gotten pictures of the hill porters, but I didn't.

Also missed photographing the guys with the hardest jobs in the world...
There was a new highway being built around New Delhi. Large rocks were delivered to the job site by ox cart, these were broken into smaller rocks by men with sledges, and then into gravel by women with small hammers. The gravel was spread with rakes, then came the hard work.
Asphalt was melted in fifty-five gallon drums over a wood fire, the molten asphalt was ladled into five-gallon cans...and guys balanced these redhot cans on their heads as they marched down to the end of the road and poured the asphalt over the freshly-spread gravel. They did this all day.
It was mid-summer with the daytime temperature was around a hundred and ten degrees.

(When I returned a year later the road construction had advanced about half a mile.)

Wow...that's hard labor. I could not imagine it. :eek:

What becomes of these people? How long do they last before their bodies give up?

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Three Cedars
12-10-2008, 02:08 AM
I'm sure some of our Grandfathers and perhaps fathers , heck maybe all of us has worked as hard as anyone in a third world country. The rise of democracy and unions are directly responsible for improved working conditons in " The West " so we don't have to cripple ourselves in order to make a living until your body breaks down and you die in your forties or younger.

It doesn't take long to lose the knowledge how hard people used to work when an easier way comes along. I've had older relatives say to me 30 years ago " young people don't know what hard work is " but then I didn't have to farm with horses and go commerical ice fishing is Saskatchabush at -40

PeterSibley
12-10-2008, 02:40 AM
I wish I'd gotten pictures of the hill porters, but I didn't.

Also missed photographing the guys with the hardest jobs in the world...
There was a new highway being built around New Delhi. Large rocks were delivered to the job site by ox cart, these were broken into smaller rocks by men with sledges, and then into gravel by women with small hammers. The gravel was spread with rakes, then came the hard work.
Asphalt was melted in fifty-five gallon drums over a wood fire, the molten asphalt was ladled into five-gallon cans...and guys balanced these redhot cans on their heads as they marched down to the end of the road and poured the asphalt over the freshly-spread gravel. They did this all day.
It was mid-summer with the daytime temperature was around a hundred and ten degrees.

(When I returned a year later the road construction had advanced about half a mile.)

Yeah ,I've seen that too .An old woman ,maybe 50 but looking 70 sitting between two huge mounds of gravel .One 4" ,one 1" ,she and her hammer were the rock breaking plant .:(:eek:

Syed
12-10-2008, 08:50 AM
http://www.crp-bangladesh.org/images/News_specialreports_heavyload_1.jpg

Quote;
"Introduction
The causes of cervical spinal cord injury vary between different countries due to differences in the country’s culture and socio-economic situation. This includes differences in working practices and choice of leisure activities. Falling while carrying a heavy load on the head is one of the most common causes of cervical spinal cord injuries in Bangladesh [1].
The practice of carrying heavy loads on the head is used throughout Bangladesh, for example farmers carrying their crop in the fields and day labourers carrying 60-100 kilograms rice and wheat sacks to transport these from one vehicle to another. To my knowledge nothing is mentioned in the literature about this practice in the developed world or in developing countries except the Congo where African women carry wood on the head [2].
We have prospectively investigated 90 cases of cervical spinal cord injury caused by falling while carrying a heavy load on the head who were admitted to the Centre for the Rehabilitation of the Paralysed. Our aims were to identify the nature and mechanism of this injury and to plan for prevention.
Materials and Methods
One thousand one hundred and thirteen spinal cord injury (SCI) patients were admitted to the Centre for the Rehabilitation of the Paralysed (CRP), Dhaka, Bangladesh, between January 1999 and June 2002. Within these, 369 (33%) had a cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI). These CSCI cases had different causes. The most common cause was falling while carrying a heavy load on the head, which accounted for 90 patients (24%). Other causes included road traffic accidents (23%), falling from a height (22%), fall of a heavy object onto the head or neck (14%), bull attack (6%) and diving into shallow water (3%)."

Shang
12-10-2008, 04:41 PM
Then there were the brick kilns.
The clay for bricks was dug from the earth in outdoor quarries; the clay was mixed with water, and tamped into wooden forms much like adobe bricks are in our southwest. The forms were removed and the bricks were sun-dried. Some bricks were used as sun-dried mud "mucca" bricks. But for more substantial building the bricks had to be fired--"pucca." I understand that in street-language-Hindi "mucca" means "commonplace," while "pucca" means "first class."

Digging the clay for thousands and thousands of bricks resulted in a huge rectangular hole several feet deep. Into this hole a large quantity of logs, boards, scrap lumber, tree roots, and about anything else that would burn was heaped into a gigantic mound. Over the mound of wood the dried mud bricks were arranged to form a barrel-vault several layers of bricks thick. Then the scrap wood was ignited. The fire burned for several days. At night the vault of red hot bricks glowed like a giant jack-o-lantern.

The temperature of the burn was regulated by opening and closing vents that had been left in the top of the vaulted bricks; at night we could see silhouettes of the brick workers running from vent to vent, moving bricks aside or pushing them back in order to maintain the proper temperature. The work was hot, difficult and dangerous. As the wood burned away the vault of bricks became less and less stabile. Although I never saw it happen I was told that occasionally the hot bricks broke and workers fell through and died in the sea of hot coals beneath.

Spin_Drift
12-11-2008, 01:07 AM
Wow, you gentlemen are posting such interesting and informative information here. I love to read it. Thank you...

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Syed
12-11-2008, 02:43 AM
(C&P)

In 1857, in Germany a continuous brick kiln was invented by F. E. Hoffmann. The first kiln had a circular, arched tunnel surrounding the chimney. This reduced the fuel consumption by more than 50% compared to the periodic kilns. Thirty years later, a British engineer, W. Bull, designed an archless version of the Hoffmann kiln, which is now called a Bull' s trench kiln. It is widely used in Pakistan, India, Bangladesh and Myanmar, but is little known elsewhere. Its greatest advantage is its low cost of construction and comparatively low energy consumption.

http://www.fastonline.org/CD3WD_40/GATE_DL/BUILDING/BK/EN/BK_FILES/FIGURE31.GIF


The firing in a Bull's trench kiln is continuous, day and night. Green bricks are loaded and finished bricks are drawn all the time. The fuel saving is achieved by reusing part of the energy that is otherwise lost in periodic kilns. As shown in Figure 4, the air for combustion is drawn through the already fired but still hot bricks. The cooling bricks transfer their heat to the combustion air, pre-heating it before it enters the firing zone. After combustion, the hot exhaust gases pass through the yet unfired bricks on their way to the chimneys. This pre-heats the bricks, so less fuel is needed to bring the bricks to the maximum temperature. Once every 24 hours the chimneys are moved forward 5 to 7 m. Daily output is 15 - 25,000 bricks.

http://www.fastonline.org/CD3WD_40/GATE_DL/BUILDING/BK/EN/BK_FILES/FIGURE32.GIF


I think this is the design of brick kilns here in Pakistan.

PeterSibley
12-11-2008, 04:08 AM
What would the fuel be in that system Syed ?

Syed
12-11-2008, 05:10 AM
The fuel is coal, which they pour into the holes on top at regular intervals.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
12-11-2008, 05:21 AM
What would the fuel be in that system Syed ?

Complicated game - depends on the source of the clay, in the Oxford blue clay band which extends across southern England, there are areas, such as in North Bedfordshire, where the organic content of the clay can be as high as 8% which is enough to make the bricks self-firing.

PeterSibley
12-11-2008, 05:36 AM
The fuel is coal, which they pour into the holes on top at regular intervals.

There is a system use in Australia whereby the fuel ,coal or sawdust etc is finely pulverised then injected with an airblast ,very efficient and allows a variety of unusual fuels .

Syed
12-11-2008, 05:54 AM
I fear those systems are too sophisticated for the Brick kilns under discussion.:) The infrastructure cost for these kilns is almost nothing.

No doubt pulverized coal firing would be very efficient. But that grinding plant must be very expensive. At least it was so, a decade back.

PeterSibley
12-11-2008, 06:15 AM
Complicated game - depends on the source of the clay, in the Oxford blue clay band which extends across southern England, there are areas, such as in North Bedfordshire, where the organic content of the clay can be as high as 8% which is enough to make the bricks self-firing.

I do like that idea ! Self firing bricks .A nice reducing atmosphere ?

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
12-11-2008, 06:29 AM
Query:
Do those bricks have substantial air-spaces, holes or voids? - the "chink" sound suggests a rather different structure that the English common - I've met some Spanish terracota tile/brick things that made a similar sound.