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View Full Version : zebre Kreuzung? (Zebre Crossing)



cs
11-26-2008, 08:31 PM
Just how many zebres are there in Germany? Are they so many that you have to have a phrase in a German/English dictionary that tells you how to say "Zebre Crossing" in German?

Chad

Phillip Allen
11-27-2008, 04:47 AM
good morning Andrew...(how's the missus Andrew and all the little Andrews?)

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
11-27-2008, 05:06 AM
They're not common but the warning is worthwhile - No end of accidents are caused by rubbernecking tourists.
http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d165/DougReid/Zebra1.jpg

OR
http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d165/DougReid/zebra2.jpg
OR
http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d165/DougReid/zebra3.jpg

Beware of these
http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d165/DougReid/ostrich1.jpg

Phillip Allen
11-27-2008, 05:19 AM
Guten morgen Philip. Meine Frau ist im Haus, (es ist ihr freier Tag) die Kinder in der Schule, und Gott ist in seinem Himmel! :D


okay, I'll try...
"good morning Phillip. My Wife is in the house (it is her ?birthday?) the kids in school and God is in his heaven

okay, how close did I get? (I guessed a lot)

Phillip Allen
11-27-2008, 05:28 AM
it was freier that got me...

I'd wonder what sort of disposition the critter has...zebra's have a famously "zebra" like personality and not much use as a domesticated animal

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
11-27-2008, 05:30 AM
One from a small child I met.


and "Z" is for Stripey Horse.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
11-27-2008, 06:00 AM
i found this gem (http://www.eastsussex.gov.uk/roadsandtransport/roads/roadsafety/crossings/default.htm)


Pegasus crossing

This is a horse-friendly type of pelican crossing. The button to activate it is much higher so that horse riders can reach it without having to dismount, and there are red and green horse signals as well as red and green men.

Presumably small children need to climb the pole to reach the button...

David G
11-27-2008, 11:02 AM
Guten morgen Philip. Meine Frau ist im Haus, (es ist ihr freier Tag) die Kinder sind in ihren Schulen, und Gott ist in seinem Himmel! :D

(Allerdings, das Wetter ist nicht wunderbar!) :D

Nicht wunderbar? Sehr schlect. Das ist aber schade.

Und dir?


"In Paris, they simply stared when I spoke to them in French. I never did succeed in making those idiots understand their language" -- Mark Twain

Hwyl
11-27-2008, 11:09 AM
Let's not forget the honourable Mr Belisha.

John B
11-27-2008, 02:32 PM
doesn't seem too bad Andrew.
They're just called pedestrian crossings here but I understood what the zebra reference meant. Here, car has ROW until the pedestrian has committed.
What are they called in the US then?

Incidentally, me mudder, who comes from a family of mad horsey people, always said that the reason that Zebras were never turned into riding animals is that they have weak ankles compared to horses and they can't cope with the loadings.
True , or urban legend? ( or rural legend ;))

PeterSibley
11-27-2008, 04:07 PM
and they bite ,often .African myth ?

Hwyl
11-27-2008, 08:09 PM
What are they called in the US then?




Crosswalk.

Laws differ in different states as ti where the pedestrian has right of way. Or whether they can be on the road at all (Jaywalking) Makes for some interesting tourist towns.

bamamick
11-28-2008, 06:09 AM
Chad, do NOT jaywalk in Germany. Religiously obey what we call the 'rot mann, gruen mann' at all the crosswalks. If you do decide to jaywalk be ready for your fellow pedestrians to chastise you with this 'tsk, tsk, tsk' sound. Plus, they will give you very dirty looks. It's quite uncomfortable.

Mickey Lake

cs
11-28-2008, 07:49 AM
Pedistran crossing, who'd thunk it. Thanks for the info.

My phrase book/dictionary says that rot is red and mann is man, so I need to watch out for the red man green man.

Chad

elf
11-28-2008, 08:11 AM
I dunno. We have a red man, but no green man, at least not in metro Boston. Where I live the pedestrian has to commit to crossing by stepping into the crosswalk. I was in the city last weekend and did what I grew up doing - crossed when there was no traffic wherever I happened to be ready to cross.

Didn't gets tsk'd.

bamamick
11-28-2008, 09:26 AM
Oh, but you would have in Germany. And believe it or not, it grows on you. Who woulda thunk it? After half a lifetime of not worrying about trivial things like traffic laws, I myself have been known to stand all alone in the pouring rain and cold, waiting for the 'gruen mann' to pop up on the signal lantern.

Mickey Lake

Clencher
11-28-2008, 03:21 PM
They are bad tempered and bite and do a lot of squabbling and fighting.

Also, they are not very polite. Ask them nicely to take their picture and this is what happens:

http://pic40.picturetrail.com/VOL370/9115650/16752884/345054988.jpg

goodbasil
11-29-2008, 07:15 PM
Are you guys sure about this "right of way" thiing?
Lots of people here think they have "right of way" in certain situations. They don't. The law does not give " right of way " to anyone. You yield "right of way". There is a lot of differance.

ingo
11-30-2008, 04:12 AM
I love you all!

It is correctly called "Zebrastreifen" (zebra strips) or in more formal words "Fußgängerüberweg". And of course it has an official sign:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/93/Zeichen_350.svg/180px-

ingo
11-30-2008, 04:17 AM
http://24lightyears.files.wordpress.com/2008/05/comic-5-zebrastreifen.jpg?w=495&h=497

"Dammed Berta, they hit another one of us..."
"Oh my god, and we just stept onto it!"

Henning 4148
11-30-2008, 11:01 AM
For all of you keen to learn our German language and keen to do a good job about it, I'd like to point out:

It is "Der" Zebrastreifen. Not "Die" or "Das" Zebrastreifen, but "Der" Zebrastreifen.

But it is "Die" Schweinshaxe - or - as the bavarians say, "oa hoxn".

And it is "Das" Bier.

Now, the English language summarizes all this under "The", so, the concept may appear a little strange to you. It tends to drive people learning German crazy.

Peerie Maa
11-30-2008, 11:24 AM
For all of you keen to learn our German language and keen to do a good job about it, I'd like to point out:

It is "Der" Zebrastreifen. Not "Die" or "Das" Zebrastreifen, but "Der" Zebrastreifen.

But it is "Die" Schweinshaxe - or - as the bavarians say, "oa hoxn".

And it is "Das" Bier.

Now, the English language summarizes all this under "The", so, the concept may appear a little strange to you. It tends to drive people learning German crazy.

The up side for me is the way you guys stitch words together to make a technical definition. Here is one I found: "Geschwindigkeitsbeschraenkung", Babel fish gives :"Speed limit".:confused:;):D

ingo
11-30-2008, 12:58 PM
According to the guiness book the longest German word is
Donaudampfschiffahrtselektrizitätenhauptbetriebswe rkbauunterbeamtengesellschaft (http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donaudampfschiffahrtselektrizit%C3%A4tenhauptbetri ebswerkbauunterbeamtengesellschaft)

And we have a law that is called
Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübert ragungsgesetz (http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rindfleischetikettierungs%C3%BCberwachungsaufgaben %C3%BCbertragungsgesetz)
(law about the transfer of controlling duties of labels on cow beef)

Peerie Maa
11-30-2008, 01:05 PM
According to the guiness book the longest German word is
Donaudampfschiffahrtselektrizitätenhauptbetriebswe rkbauunterbeamtengesellschaft (http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donaudampfschiffahrtselektrizit%C3%A4tenhauptbetri ebswerkbauunterbeamtengesellschaft)



Translate, oh please translate it.

Peerie Maa
11-30-2008, 01:15 PM
I think that mine was more fun, "Geschwindigkeitsbeschraenkung" = three English syllables.:D

bamamick
11-30-2008, 01:56 PM
Yes, yes. The articles. I have found that the best way is to sort of slur your way through those uncomfortable articles. What difference does it make, anyway? 'the' is 'the', ja?

All of our upper management have compulsary German classes. Most of the guys have taken it for years, and before you can advance to the highest levels within our company you must pass a competency test. I would love to take the classes but I honestly don't have the time (it's not required at my level).

As far as my 'kinder Deutsch' goes, it gets me by, and a smile and an honest attempt at it has never failed to get me where I needed to go.

Mickey Lake

Antonio Majer
11-30-2008, 02:43 PM
20 and more years ago I was used to go and study a bit of German in Germany, beim Göhte Institut, during the summer. As Italian living in Italy, I was used to think of the zebra crossing as a sort of challenge to the death, because being a pedestrian on an Italian road is extremely dangerous. Strangely here when one is a pedestrian, hates the car drivers, and in some way he challenges them to a sort of duel, but when the same guy gets into his car, starts immediately hating the pedestrians. Anyway: I still remember my astonishment when - in a German village, Boppard am Mein - I came close to a German zebra crossing for the first time. I was still 3-4 meter far away from it, and the German cars already began to stop! I stayed there without words...