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TimothyB
01-19-2005, 03:08 PM
I just realized that noone has commented on this.. in the latest WB there is a big article on the building of Alca, a George Buehler motor-sailer design done for a biologist, intended to help him research algae life in the Arctic. Interesting project and plenty of detail on construction in there.

Any comments? I was surprised that they used Red Oak for strips, but then again, encapsulated in epoxy/glass and she should be ok. She's been on the water for months and has suffered no mishaps and is strong and able. And with a 2" oak hull pretty durn solid.

Definitely a -working- boat.

--T

[ 01-19-2005, 03:10 PM: Message edited by: TimothyB ]

Thad Van Gilder
01-19-2005, 03:17 PM
I'd say.

speaking of which, anyone ever build Beuhler's Olga? I've been thinking about it...

-Thad

kc8pql
01-19-2005, 04:33 PM
Here's a link to a slightly modified Olga that completed a circumnavigation in 2003. Iwalani (http://www.worldvoyagers.com/iwalani/index1.htm)

Norske3
01-19-2005, 05:18 PM
RED OAK....what a tragic choice...to save a few $ up front... :(

mmd
01-19-2005, 05:27 PM
I wouldn't dismiss it so readily, Norske. It will be interesting to see if epoxy encapsulation will effectively shield red oak's Achilles heel - it's lack of tyloses in it's pores, which allows water ingress and rapid decay. I hope we can follow this vessel's progress over the next few years.

TimothyB
01-20-2005, 11:08 AM
From the article, I don't think he chose Red Oak for $$ reasons. It's true he was being cost conscious, but if you look at the finished product, he put quite a bit of dinero into that vessel.

He chose it for 2 reasons.. (1) He had large quantities available on his tree farm which he could cut himself, to any specs he wanted and (2) for strength, since Alca was built to withstand the Arctic.

Bob Smalser
01-20-2005, 11:46 AM
Any comments? I was surprised that they used Red Oak for strips, but then again, encapsulated in epoxy/glass and she should be ok. She's been on the water for months and has suffered no mishaps and is strong and able. And with a 2" oak hull pretty durn solid. I've got timber rights to 28 acres of nice Bigleaf Maple....but free for the labor or not, it'd be the last thing I'd use in a boat.

That said, I suspect the sheathed Red Oak hull will be fine providing they stay in cold water and do proper maintenance.

Moving the boat to Florida and neglecting even a minor sheathing penetration could do a lot of damage very quickly, however. Like when surveying a wood-core glass boat and pulling a lower transom fastener to watch the smelly, black ooze weep out....it can be fixed...but bring serious money.

TimothyB
01-21-2005, 10:49 AM
Personally, I wouldn't use Red Oak either, unless it was What I Had, in which case I would because its better to have a rotten boat in 20 years, and having had use of it for that time, than 5 years in one with better wood and wishing for all that time back ;) Keep in mind, this guy is 70.

If I was going to use hardwood for strip planking, I suppose I would choose Black Locust, or even Honey Locust (which purportedly has decent rot resistance.. just not as herculean as the Black).

Don Kurylko
01-22-2005, 10:58 PM
A point of clarification lads - the hull is planked with White Oak, not Red.

Cheers,
Don

TimothyB
01-24-2005, 10:43 AM
Originally posted by Don Kurylko:
A point of clarification lads - the hull is planked with White Oak, not Red.

Cheers,
DonDon.. I'm looking at the article right now. smile.gif

pp44 - "The hull is strip planked, using 2" x 3" Red Oak."

Tar Devil
01-24-2005, 02:09 PM
From George Beuhler's web site...


She is quite stoutly built of solid white oak; laminated oak keel and stems, double sawed oak frames, and 2 3/8” x 2 1/2” strip oak planking. The exception are the decks, which are 2 1/2” fir plywood. The entire structure will be coated with epoxy.
Wonder which one is wrong?? :confused:

Later,

Phil

TimothyB
01-24-2005, 02:23 PM
I'd assume that the article in WB is correct, since they spent a lot of time talking to the builder about it, and I feel certain they would not say 'red oak' unless they knew it was so.

Tar Devil
01-24-2005, 02:57 PM
On the other hand, I expect George communicated with them a bit more than did WoodenBoat, you think? He did, after all, design it specifically for them.

Who knows...

Later,

Phil

John Bell
01-24-2005, 03:06 PM
There were a few posts on this board about ALCA I when she was under construction by someone who was part of the building crew or friends of same. I recall those posts mentioning red oak planking as well.

The abominable forum search function has failed to find them however. Maybe somebody else will have better luck finding them.

Don Kurylko
01-24-2005, 04:53 PM
Oops, you’re right. Red Oak it is. Sorry. Better go see my optometrist! redface.gif :D

RonW
01-25-2005, 01:29 AM
Reguardless of whether it is red or white oak, oak weighs in at about 47 lbs a cubic foot. And on another thread, -changing carvel to strip planking- you have george from brazil that built a 57 footer out of IPE, which weighs in at 64 lbs a cubic foot, too heavy and hard to even float.

Seems like awfully strong woods to use for strip planking. Referring to the wood wanting to spring back particularly from the stem and transom.
This is just a ongoing saga as to what wood, glue and or sealant to use on strip planked hulls.

There are far too many success stories on strip planked hulls, and then you have a few failures.
I am beginning to think the failures are directed related to the hull fastening schedule more then the type of wood or sealant used between the strips.