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brigadoon
07-17-2003, 12:41 PM
My 2-cylinder, 22 HP Saab has a blocked raw water cooling system. I have already replaced the water pump diaphragm and valves, and the pump is working fine. The cooling water is not getting through the engine and back out to the silencer. I have tried flushing it with mild muriatic acid, but I simply can't get water to pass through the cooling channels (the silencer and exhaust is fine). I've removed the silencer and water intake tubes from the engine and tried running a wire "snake" through (it goes in quite a ways on both ends), but still no flow.

Can you offer any suggestions, short of removing the cylinder head cover? (I'm not sure that would give me access to the cooling jacket anyway). I do my own work, have a fairly decent manual and saab parts book, but I am a novice and rather intimidated about getting into the cylinders. Many thanks for any suggestions. Sheri Hall brigadoon2@aol.com

Bob Smalser
07-17-2003, 01:55 PM
Short of a power washer with nozzle pressed into a rubber cone fabricated to seal the water exit port-nozzle interface, you've already tried all my tricks. But be careful...you can blow water past the sleeve's seal, destroying it...which your muriatic acid already may have.

...and, if it's corrosion causing the blockage, that's only a temporary fix.

Dunno the Sabb, but pulling the head and sleeves (and I'm presuming this model has wet sleeves - can't tell from the pic) is no big deal...you'll need a half-inch socket set with torque wrench and maybe a large wheel puller, a ring compressor to fit your pistons for reinstallation, along with new head gasket set and o-rings for the sleeves....or whatever sleeve seal the Sabb uses.

We've done them by the side of the road rather than pay an expensive tow fee.

Your manual should cover it. If these engines require a special cylinder sleeve puller, perhaps you can borrow or rent one locally.

If you have to pull the injector pump to get the sleeves off, leave the drive gear the pump bolts to in it's housing EXACTLY in the position it was in when the pump came off - and scribe some alignment marks on the gear and housing in case it gets knocked out - then tape it in place - all without removing it. When/if you move that piston/crankshaft combo, that gear's gonna move and try to fly out of there...be prepared if it does.

And be sure to use new rubber and/or copper washers when reinstalling the fuel lines. And to retorque those head bolts by the book after 10 or so hours of operation once it's reassembled.

You likely have significant corrosion near the bottom of the cylinder sleeves in the water jacket...but I'm saying that w/o knowing how old the engine is or how the water channels run....I'm guessing they are similar to the wet-sleeved engines I'm familiar with - the o-rings on the bottom of the sleeves are to keep coolant out of the crankcase.

This Boatdiesel.com site has some Sabb cooling info but they want 25 bucks to join for access:

http://boatdiesel.com/index.cfm?CFID=5118788&CFTOKEN=61713851&CFApp=19&&Red=NRU

Good luck, and perhaps someone with more experience on Sabbs than me will come along shortly.

http://www.xsw.com/boojum/Sabb30/Sabb30-i.JPG

[ 07-17-2003, 03:49 PM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]

redsail
07-17-2003, 06:36 PM
Hello Sheri. Being raw water cooled and blocked up it is likely salt. That salt just bakes very hard when it is cooked for a while and as your cooling flow diminished the hotter your engine ran.
I have the 2GZ Sabb and love it, but it does take occasional tinkering.
The raw cooling water passes into the block, cooling the liners and then up thru the heads before being pushed into the silencer, then out and away with the exhaust. The passages are all quite small. Just removing the cyl head cover will not get you there.
Removing the cyl heads and carefully cleaning the salt from the passages is pretty straightforeward and you can then work a wire thru the passages in the block and clear any blockage that may be there .Go easy and maybe use some water and a wet/dry shop vac to help suck on those holes. There is a product called Salt Away that is a weak acid solution that may help soften up the blockages. The water nozzels between the block and head can be removed and cleaned. Tap them back with a wooden mallet.
If your engine has lots of hours on it , it would be worth thinking of having the valves ground while the heads are off. Then the shop that does the valves would do a chemical dip job on the heads and they would be thouroughly clean. Be sure of the passage between the heads and the silencer and flush the silencer. Also be certain there is no blockage in the exhaust where the salt water meets the dry exhaust. That water/exhaust/ heat mix creates sulphuric acid which can break down and /or rust up that area.
You always have to know when to stop, but if it is this far apart, get the injectors checked too. The shop that just did mine commented that the tips were quite inexpensive and it sure runs nice.
I have always felt that the lubrication to the rocker arm bearings is inadequate as the bearings get flatspotted, particularrly the front one. This is because there is only one oil feed/spray line to the top end on my engine. Yours may be a later model and I believe that was changed and the newer engines have two . You may want to think about changing those bearings. They can supply them at any good parts place- you don't need to phone Norway.Hope this helps. Good luck
John Porter .

redsail
07-17-2003, 06:38 PM
Hello Sheri. Being raw water cooled and blocked up it is likely salt. That salt just bakes very hard when it is cooked for a while and as your cooling flow diminished the hotter your engine ran.
I have the 2GZ Sabb and love it, but it does take occasional tinkering.
The raw cooling water passes into the block, cooling the liners and then up thru the heads before being pushed into the silencer, then out and away with the exhaust. The passages are all quite small. Just removing the cyl head cover will not get you there.
Removing the cyl heads and carefully cleaning the salt from the passages is pretty straightforeward and you can then work a wire thru the passages in the block and clear any blockage that may be there .Go easy and maybe use some water and a wet/dry shop vac to help suck on those holes. There is a product called Salt Away that is a weak acid solution that may help soften up the blockages. The water nozzels between the block and head can be removed and cleaned. Tap them back with a wooden mallet.
If your engine has lots of hours on it , it would be worth thinking of having the valves ground while the heads are off. Then the shop that does the valves would do a chemical dip job on the heads and they would be thouroughly clean. Be sure of the passage between the heads and the silencer and flush the silencer. Also be certain there is no blockage in the exhaust where the salt water meets the dry exhaust. That water/exhaust/ heat mix creates sulphuric acid which can break down and /or rust up that area.
You always have to know when to stop, but if it is this far apart, get the injectors checked too. The shop that just did mine commented that the tips were quite inexpensive and it sure runs nice.
I have always felt that the lubrication to the rocker arm bearings is inadequate as the bearings get flatspotted, particularrly the front one. This is because there is only one oil feed/spray line to the top end on my engine. Yours may be a later model and I believe that was changed and the newer engines have two . You may want to think about changing those bearings. They can supply them at any good parts place- you don't need to phone Norway.Hope this helps. Good luck
John Porter .