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Bruce Taylor
11-11-2008, 07:30 AM
Aftermath
by Siegfried Sassoon


Have you forgotten yet?...
For the world's events have rumbled on since those gagged days,
Like traffic checked a while at the crossing of city ways:
And the haunted gap in your mind has filled with thoughts that flow
Like clouds in the lit heavens of life; and you're a man reprieved to go,
Taking your peaceful share of Time, with joy to spare.
But the past is just the same—and War's a bloody game...
Have you forgotten yet?...
Look down, and swear by the slain of the War that you'll never forget.

Do you remember the dark months you held the sector at Mametz—
The nights you watched and wired and dug and piled sandbags on parapets?
Do you remember the rats; and the stench
Of corpses rotting in front of the front-line trench—
And dawn coming, dirty-white, and chill with a hopeless rain?
Do you ever stop and ask, 'Is it all going to happen again?'

Do you remember that hour of din before the attack—
And the anger, the blind compassion that seized and shook you then
As you peered at the doomed and haggard faces of your men?
Do you remember the stretcher-cases lurching back
With dying eyes and lolling heads—those ashen-gray
Masks of the lads who once were keen and kind and gay?

Have you forgotten yet?...
Look up, and swear by the slain of the war that you'll never forget!

March 1919.

Phillip Allen
11-11-2008, 07:48 AM
I had two great, great uncles die at Cairo, Illinois pow camps...they never saw their homes again

troutman
11-11-2008, 07:19 PM
What a war. Sassoon, Robert Graves and Wilfred Owen fighting and dying and writing poetry about it. One of them, I think Sassoon writes about seeing a man die in a gas attack. Owen dying a few days before it ended. All those little villages where all the young guys died in one day at the Somme.

Keith Wilson
11-11-2008, 07:55 PM
Wilfred Owen wrote the one about the gas attack; it was published posthumously.

Dulce Et Decorum Est
Wilfred Owen

Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,
Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,
Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs
And towards our distant rest began to trudge.
Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots
But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind;
Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots
Of disappointed shells that dropped behind.

GAS! Gas! Quick, boys!-- An ecstasy of fumbling,
Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time;
But someone still was yelling out and stumbling
And floundering like a man in fire or lime.--
Dim, through the misty panes and thick green light
As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.

In all my dreams, before my helpless sight,
He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning.

If in some smothering dreams you too could pace
Behind the wagon that we flung him in,
And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,
His hanging face, like a devil's sick of sin;
If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood
Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,
Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud
Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,--
My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
To children ardent for some desperate glory,
The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est
Pro patria mori. This may be the best one of all.

Grass
Carl Sandburg

Pile the bodies high at Austerlitz and Waterloo.
Shovel them under and let me work -
I am the grass; I cover all.

And pile them high at Gettysburg
And pile them high at Ypres and Verdun.
Shovel them under and let me work.

Two years, ten years, and passengers ask the conductor:
What place is this?
Where are we now?
I am the grass.
Let me work.

bob winter
11-11-2008, 08:14 PM
I have not forgotten, nor will I. War ruined my father's life and also ruined my assorted great uncles and they were the supposed surviors. The dead were likely luckier.

The first war was to be the war tha ended all war. Didn't quite work out that way, didn't it.

Hughman
11-12-2008, 12:36 AM
And the bankers sit at home counting their profits.....

Tylerdurden
11-12-2008, 05:28 AM
And the bankers sit at home counting their profits.....

Exactly.

Peerie Maa
11-12-2008, 05:44 AM
Two of Eric Bogle’s songs do it for me, see “And the band played Waltzing Matilda” and “ No Mans Land” on here: http://ericbogle.net/lyrics/index.htm.

Popeye
11-12-2008, 09:31 AM
i got a poppy for a small donation to the royal canadian legion and wore it , on the left , close to the heart all weekend , told the kids what it was about and they wanted one too

Phillip Allen
11-12-2008, 09:39 AM
i got a poppy for a small donation to the royal canadian legion and wore it , on the left , close to the heart all weekend , told the kids what it was about and they wanted one too

I remember those...haven't seen them since I was a boy!

Popeye
11-12-2008, 09:43 AM
remembrance

http://www.mun.ca/marcomm/gazette/2001-2002/nov1/resources/poppy-.jpg

Bruce Taylor
11-12-2008, 09:51 AM
I remember those...haven't seen them since I was a boy!

They're still a big part of Remembrance Day around here.

Phillip Allen
11-12-2008, 09:54 AM
They're still a big part of Remembrance Day around here.

dunno what happened...kinda miss it now that I am reminded...I certainly would buy one and wear it

Steve Paskey
11-12-2008, 10:02 AM
They're still a big part of Remembrance Day around here.

I was in Montreal on Remembrance Day two years ago and still have the poppy I wore. I had the privilege that day of interviewing Lt. Gen. Romeo Dallaire, who served as commander of the small, ill-equipped U.N. peacekeeping force that was in Rwanda during the genocide. That's a conversation I'll never forget.

Popeye
11-12-2008, 10:09 AM
there's not much to it phil , wear a poppy , lay a wreath, see the color guard , a moment of silence , a salute

http://www.vac-acc.gc.ca/content/feature/italy99/Images/1010_13.jpg
year by year there are fewer and fewer vets

Phillip Allen
11-12-2008, 10:10 AM
I'd like to visit Normady...maybe some other places too

Bruce Taylor
11-12-2008, 10:36 AM
I'd like to visit Normady...maybe some other places too

Growing up in France, we spent a lot of time at war memorials & Allied cemeteries. It always seemed to be raining when we toured the sites at Dieppe, Juno Beach, and, of course, Vimy Ridge, a little piece of Canada on European soil:

http://www.btinternet.com/~m.royden/roydenfhp/roydenbranches/charlesroyden/returntofrance/vimyridge/memorial1.jpg

Bruce Taylor
11-12-2008, 10:41 AM
there's not much to it phil , wear a poppy , lay a wreath, see the color guard , a moment of silence , a salute

And the bagpipes...