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Memphis Mike
10-24-2008, 10:40 AM
What a joy it is to finally see the light that I rushed home for lunch early to tell you guys and gals!:)

NPR interviewed "Dude" that runs Dude's Doughnuts in Joplin Missouri this morning.

Dude said he will be voting for McCain because McCain and Sarah are against abortion and same sex marriage and as long as those values are in place, "the country can go broke but we will be OK because God will still be with us."

Well I'm here to tell ya if it's good enough for Dude then you bet cha! {winky winky} it's good enough for me.

If all I have to do is vote against abortion and same sex marriage and everything will be alright then I'm completely sold and will be voting Republican.:)

Memphis Mike
10-24-2008, 10:56 AM
I think Scot should give me a sticky on this. I mean it.

Leon m
10-24-2008, 11:03 AM
I just heard her on the radio this morning praying for god to put a new pipe line through Alaska. So ya see, God will help with the economy too.

I think these people are on to something here...all we have to do is pray to god and everything will be great! What an original idea I wonder why no one ever thought of that before.

Put me down for a Republican vote too ! :)

God bless us everyone !

Memphis Mike
10-24-2008, 11:04 AM
Welcome aboard Leon!:)

Leon m
10-24-2008, 11:06 AM
Welcome aboard Leon!:)

Praise be to you reverend Mike !...I have seen the light ! :D Can I get an AMEN ?!?!

Memphis Mike
10-24-2008, 11:09 AM
Amen brother! Praise Jesus!

ucb4ume
10-24-2008, 11:10 AM
“Dude” is obviously a one dimensional thinker… maybe two dimensional on a good day. “Dude” is also is also representative of the way the press has propagandized the presidential election. NPR, along with the rest of the MSM (including FOX) loves to go out and find the most idiotic statement they can, and present it in a package that is designed for a specific voter base. In this case they have targeted naive Democrats. They want naive Democrats to believe that all Republicans are like “Dude”. I think that’s called stereotyping.

For those of you that believe in stereotypes, you can stop reading here, because “Dude” is the typical Republican voter.

For those of you choose to think a little bit deeper, you know what’s really going on with this type of report. I’m sure I could find stereotypical right leaning news reports, just like this one and post it on this forum. But that would be a waste of electrons because all you intelligent Democrats out there would see right through it. See, you kept reading, so I know none of you will stereotype me.:D

Memphis Mike
10-24-2008, 11:20 AM
"For those of you that believe in stereotypes, you can stop reading here, because “Dude” is the typical Republican voter."

From what I've seen, at least in this part of the country, Dude IS the typical Republican low information voter.

capt jake
10-24-2008, 11:23 AM
I'm praying for the winning Lotto ticket. ;) Maybe my luck will change. :)

ucb4ume
10-24-2008, 11:31 AM
"For those of you that believe in stereotypes, you can stop reading here, because “Dude” is the typical Republican voter."

From what I've seen, at least in this part of the country, Dude IS the typical Republican low information voter.

My point exactly.

pila
10-24-2008, 11:37 AM
I have a friend that will vote Republican no matter who or "what" is running for office. He follows what is told to him in church. We don't discuss that stuff, per my request.

ucb4ume
10-24-2008, 11:40 AM
I have a friend that will vote Republican no matter who or "what" is running for office. He follows what is told to him in church. We don't discuss that stuff, per my request.

Does that mean all Republicans vote based on what they hear in church?

elf
10-24-2008, 11:41 AM
Rev, this is the second time that you've changed your declared affiliation! Are you planning on making up your mind before Nov. 2nd.? Or are you going to drag us all back and forth for the next week and a half?;) :rolleyes:

capt jake
10-24-2008, 11:42 AM
Rev, this is the second time that you've changed your declared affiliation! Are you planning on making up your mind before Nov. 2nd.? Or are you going to drag us all back and forth for the next week and a half?;) :rolleyes:


Naaa.. He'll do a write in ballot for Paris! :) LOL

Cuyahoga Chuck
10-24-2008, 11:52 AM
“Dude” is obviously a one dimensional thinker… maybe two dimensional on a good day. “Dude” is also is also representative of the way the press has propagandized the presidential election. NPR, along with the rest of the MSM (including FOX) loves to go out and find the most idiotic statement they can, and present it in a package that is designed for a specific voter base. In this case they have targeted naive Democrats. They want naive Democrats to believe that all Republicans are like “Dude”. I think that’s called stereotyping.

For those of you that believe in stereotypes, you can stop reading here, because “Dude” is the typical Republican voter.

For those of you choose to think a little bit deeper, you know what’s really going on with this type of report. I’m sure I could find stereotypical right leaning news reports, just like this one and post it on this forum. But that would be a waste of electrons because all you intelligent Democrats out there would see right through it. See, you kept reading, so I know none of you will stereotype me.:D

I may be drawing a wrong conclusion but I have suspected there are a lot of US voters who are as shortsighted as "Dude" because George Bush, under the tutilage of Karl Rove, got elected president twice and Bush maintained a 30% favorable rating even tho' everything he touched was close to a disaster. Even today with the economy coming down around our ears there are those that see no problem in him or his governance and are willing to replace him with someone with similar views.
If you have perused as many of these posts as I have you will notice almost no one ever volunteers they had voted for Bush even tho' every syllable they write has "bushlover" written all over it.
You?

JimD
10-24-2008, 12:35 PM
I'm praying for the winning Lotto ticket. ;) Maybe my luck will change. :)

Unfortunately, probably not, capt. God only wants what's right and best for America so prayers for personal gain often go unanswered. Its all about God's special relationship with the USA. That's why it's important to vote Republican. Its for the good of the nation.

John of Phoenix
10-24-2008, 12:50 PM
ucb4ume, you're surely correct that not all republicans are of Dude's mental capabilities. But as Milo the Esteemed has so accurately stated,
This election isn't about issues, it's about values.

To deny that is to deny reality. (What am I saying? :D )

ucb4ume
10-24-2008, 12:53 PM
I may be drawing a wrong conclusion but I have suspected there are a lot of US voters who are as shortsighted as "Dude" because George Bush, under the tutilage of Karl Rove, got elected president twice and Bush maintained a 30% favorable rating even tho' everything he touched was close to a disaster. Even today with the economy coming down around our ears there are those that see no problem in him or his governance and are willing to replace him with someone with similar views.
If you have perused as many of these posts as I have you will notice almost no one ever volunteers they had voted for Bush even tho' every syllable they write has "bushlover" written all over it.
You?

I would agree with you that there are a lot of shortsighted voters like “Dude”, but I would add that they are on both sides. The point I’m trying to make is that the country is being manipulated by the media on both the left and the right. The NPR report is simply playing to the political left in this country and trying to get them to believe that all republicans are like “Dude”. I say that not all republicans are not like “Dude”. I’m a republican and have been since 1977.

As for George Bush, I did vote for him, twice. Even though I have become extremely disillusioned with the Republican Party over the past few years, I still believe in small government, fiscal conservation, less taxation and more freedom. Unfortunately, it’s my opinion that neither George Bush nor the Democrat controlled Congress believes in these ideals. If the Executive, Legislative and Judicial branches of our government are all controlled by the Democrats, I feel like all of those ideals would be diminished.

I sure hope that you are right about the economy. If this disaster is the sole responsibility of the Bush Administration’s economic policies, then an Obama Administration should be able to solve the problems relatively quickly. However, I don’t think it was just George Bush that got us into this mess. There are a lot of Democrats on Capital hill that ignored this problem until it was too late. Maybe that’s why, at 18%, their approval rating is even lower than George Bush’s. http://www.gallup.com/poll/107242/congress-approval-rating-ties-lowest-gallup-records.aspx (http://www.gallup.com/poll/107242/congress-approval-rating-ties-lowest-gallup-records.aspx)

Tom Montgomery
10-24-2008, 12:53 PM
It's all about values. Not about issues. So sez the McCain campaign.

Cuyahoga Chuck
10-24-2008, 02:24 PM
I would agree with you that there are a lot of shortsighted voters like “Dude”, but I would add that they are on both sides. The point I’m trying to make is that the country is being manipulated by the media on both the left and the right. The NPR report is simply playing to the political left in this country and trying to get them to believe that all republicans are like “Dude”. I say that not all republicans are not like “Dude”. I’m a republican and have been since 1977

Have you no fear that NPR's report may have tapped into a big chunk of Republican thought? After all, you and your Republican peers made several teeny bad choices in the past which have come to endanger the Republic.


As for George Bush, I did vote for him, twice. Even though I have become extremely disillusioned with the Republican Party over the past few years, I still believe in small government, fiscal conservation, less taxation and more freedom. Unfortunately, it’s my opinion that neither George Bush nor the Democrat controlled Congress believes in these ideals. If the Executive, Legislative and Judicial branches of our government are all controlled by the Democrats, I feel like all of those ideals would be diminished.

Believe what you wish but real world events demand that government deal with catastrophic problems which will require an expansion of government. Everyone with an ounce of sense will welcome a return to a stabile economy no matter how muscular the government has to become to pull that off.
Old timey Republican sloganeering may give you a warm feeling in your guts but it won't make a dent in our overall problems.


I sure hope that you are right about the economy. If this disaster is the sole responsibility of the Bush Administration’s economic policies, then an Obama Administration should be able to solve the problems relatively quickly. However, I don’t think it was just George Bush that got us into this mess. There are a lot of Democrats on Capital hill that ignored this problem until it was too late. Maybe that’s why, at 18%, their approval rating is even lower than George Bush’s.
http://www.gallup.com/poll/107242/congress-approval-rating-ties-lowest-gallup-records.aspx (http://www.gallup.com/poll/107242/congress-approval-rating-ties-lowest-gallup-records.aspx)

There were only a few that had the power to intercede in the runaway finacial markets and at the top of the list is the president. He has the ultimate bully pulpit. He can preempt every soap opera, football game, and rock concert in the land when stuff hits the fan. The Congress of the United States was, from it's inception, design to be slow and deliberative. And at it current size, 538 members, it's never going to make a good flying squad to stave off disaster.
The badboys who were not doing due diligence were Bush, Greenspan, Cox and some of the no-names on their staffs. Greenspan has, as much as, admitted his right-wing economic theories contained a lot of bunk.

I have posted this thought about a hundred tinmes but you righties always fall back on it.
The approval rating of the US Congress is a canard. It doesn't make sense because the same people that dislike the entire congress by a wide margine will say their own representatives are first rate. The re-election percentages, congress after congress, back up that.

Memphis Mike
10-24-2008, 02:32 PM
This Republican that I know personally was bitchin about losing his job as a steel worker and saying he didn't know what he was going to do, the economy was so bad. I asked him what he thought about W's economic policies. He said he thought W had done a good job as president.:rolleyes:

Don't try to tell me that ignorance isn't prevalent in the Republican party.:rolleyes: We have mega churches socked full of 'Dudes" in this part of the country.

botebum
10-24-2008, 02:41 PM
Rev, this is the second time that you've changed your declared affiliation! Are you planning on making up your mind before Nov. 2nd.? Or are you going to drag us all back and forth for the next week and a half?;) :rolleyes:
You won't give him till the fourth? Why not?

Doug

capt jake
10-24-2008, 02:53 PM
Unfortunately, probably not, capt. God only wants what's right and best for America so prayers for personal gain often go unanswered. Its all about God's special relationship with the USA. That's why it's important to vote Republican. Its for the good of the nation.


Nope, you have it all wrong! It's called trickle down economics. I will spend and therefore, it will trickle down amongst the rest of the nation. ;) ;) Hell, seems to be what the Republicans want anyway, why not start with praying for my Lotto ticket! :D:D

Uncle Duke
10-24-2008, 03:29 PM
Mike - I really think that you should use this for the musical inspiration you seek: write a song...

Hey, Dude
Go vote McCain
Take your good vote
And make it badder
Remember that God will make it all good
So when you're out of food
You can still sleep at night....

(Apologies to Lennon/McCartney...):D

ucb4ume
10-24-2008, 03:35 PM
This Republican that I know personally was bitchin about losing his job as a steel worker and saying he didn't know what he was going to do, the economy was so bad. I asked him what he thought about W's economic policies. He said he thought W had done a good job as president.:rolleyes:

Don't try to tell me that ignorance isn't prevalent in the Republican party.:rolleyes: We have mega churches socked full of 'Dudes" in this part of the country.

Send your Republican friend down here. Our unemployment is less than 4% right now. We need all types of skilled workers. Can he weld? Can he climb and erect steel structures? The Oil and Gas industry is hurting for skilled labor right now.

I manage a Network Operations Center here in Lafayette. I need network engineers, customer service reps and satellite communications engineers. Do you know any? Send them down; we'll put them to work.

Also, I'm not trying to tell you there aren't ignorant Republicans. There certainly are. There are also ignorant Democrats and NPR is just pandering to them.

Also, what's the obsession with mega churches? Do you think that all Republicans attend mega churches and all mega churches only have Republicans? I know lots of Republicans who don’t even go to church. On the other hand, I know Democrats who do go to church.
Help me understand this relationship between mega churches and Republicans.

Tar Devil
10-24-2008, 03:44 PM
I have several friends who will vote Republican for no other reason than their guns. They're convinced Obama will take their weapons and that single issue is driving their vote. Everything else be damned.

botebum
10-24-2008, 03:48 PM
Me too Phil, silly ain't it?

Doug

ron ll
10-24-2008, 03:49 PM
Help me understand this relationship between mega churches and Republicans.

Its all about logic. Someone who attends a megachurch was telling me that god created the universe which includes all the evidence that proves he didn't. Now there is some logic ANY republican can get behind.

Mrleft8
10-24-2008, 03:56 PM
Right along with the McCain volunteer who faked her own robbery and beating, and blamed it on a "6'4" black man" who was an Obama supporter... Pretty damned sick...

John of Phoenix
10-24-2008, 04:04 PM
I have several friends who will vote Republican for no other reason than their guns. They're convinced Obama will take their weapons and that single issue is driving their vote. Everything else be damned.

I overheard a couple of retired ladies talking.
"Millie, you'd better get that hip replaced right away. When Obama's elected you won't be able to get it done."

Now four years down the line, when all this proves to be lies, do you think Phil's friends or these ladies will acknowledge that they were lied to? Not a chance.

John of Phoenix
10-24-2008, 04:06 PM
Right along with the McCain volunteer who faked her own robbery and beating, and blamed it on a "6'4" black man" who was an Obama supporter... Pretty damned sick...

Hey lady, that's only a "B" when you do it in your mirror.

http://assets.nydailynews.com/img/2008/10/25/amd_victim.jpg
Bryant [police spokesperson] says Todd can't explain why she invented the story or explain how the "B'' was scratched onto her face.
Seek professional help.

Vince Brennan
10-24-2008, 04:38 PM
Can't hold either McCain's or the RNC's feet to the fire on that one. Clearly a self-mis-directed sense of "helping" the campaign. Poor kid does definitely need psych help.

ucb4ume
10-24-2008, 04:42 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by ucb4ume (http://www.woodenboat.com/forum/showthread.php?p=1987444#post1987444)
I would agree with you that there are a lot of shortsighted voters like “Dude”, but I would add that they are on both sides. The point I’m trying to make is that the country is being manipulated by the media on both the left and the right. The NPR report is simply playing to the political left in this country and trying to get them to believe that all republicans are like “Dude”. I say that not all republicans are not like “Dude”. I’m a republican and have been since 1977

Have you no fear that NPR's report may have tapped into a big chunk of Republican thought? After all, you and your Republican peers made several teeny bad choices in the past which have come to endanger the Republic.
No, I’m not really afraid that “Dude” represents the typical Republican thought. I think NPR is pandering to the less informed Democrats who think all Republicans are “Jesus Freaks”. You don’t really think all Republicans are “Jesus Freaks” do you? Don’t get me wrong, I know there are a lot of Born Again types in the Republican Party, but I don’t know any of them. I think this is just a stereotype that NPR is trying to promote to the less informed Democrats. You don’t really think all Republicans go to a Mega Church, do you? I for one, cuss like a sailor, drink like a fish and haven’t seen the inside of a church in years. As far as religion goes, I claim to be agnostic.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ucb4ume (http://www.woodenboat.com/forum/showthread.php?p=1987444#post1987444)
As for George Bush, I did vote for him, twice. Even though I have become extremely disillusioned with the Republican Party over the past few years, I still believe in small government, fiscal conservation, less taxation and more freedom. Unfortunately, it’s my opinion that neither George Bush nor the Democrat controlled Congress believes in these ideals. If the Executive, Legislative and Judicial branches of our government are all controlled by the Democrats, I feel like all of those ideals would be diminished.



Believe what you wish but real world events demand that government deal with catastrophic problems which will require an expansion of government. Everyone with an ounce of sense will welcome a return to a stabile economy no matter how muscular the government has to become to pull that off.
Well, I don’t know if I would go that far. I certainly want a return to a stable economy, but I don’t believe we should allow the government to have unlimited power. Now THAT scares me.
Old timey Republican sloganeering may give you a warm feeling in your guts but it won't make a dent in our overall problems.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ucb4ume (http://www.woodenboat.com/forum/showthread.php?p=1987444#post1987444)
I sure hope that you are right about the economy. If this disaster is the sole responsibility of the Bush Administration’s economic policies, then an Obama Administration should be able to solve the problems relatively quickly. However, I don’t think it was just George Bush that got us into this mess. There are a lot of Democrats on Capital hill that ignored this problem until it was too late. Maybe that’s why, at 18%, their approval rating is even lower than George Bush’s.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ucb4ume (http://www.woodenboat.com/forum/showthread.php?p=1987444#post1987444)
http://www.gallup.com/poll/107242/congress-approval-rating-ties-lowest-gallup-records.aspx (http://www.gallup.com/poll/107242/congress-approval-rating-ties-lowest-gallup-records.aspx)

There were only a few that had the power to intercede in the runaway finacial markets and at the top of the list is the president. He has the ultimate bully pulpit. He can preempt every soap opera, football game, and rock concert in the land when stuff hits the fan. The Congress of the United States was, from it's inception, design to be slow and deliberative. And at it current size, 538 members, it's never going to make a good flying squad to stave off disaster.
The badboys who were not doing due diligence were Bush, Greenspan, Cox and some of the no-names on their staffs. Greenspan has, as much as, admitted his right-wing economic theories contained a lot of bunk.

Ok, there were no Democrats that had any influence over our economy. It’s all George Bush’s fault. Do you know any good re-education camps I can enroll in?:confused:
I can't wait for Obama to get in there. He'll use the bully pulpit to fix the economy.

I have posted this thought about a hundred tinmes but you righties always fall back on it.
The approval rating of the US Congress is a canard. It doesn't make sense because the same people that dislike the entire congress by a wide margine will say their own representatives are first rate. The re-election percentages, congress after congress, back up that.

In 2002 the approval rating was 84%,in 2008 the approval rating was 18%. Now, I’m just an ignorant Republican, so I can’t see that there’s a drop in approval since 2002. Oh, Wait! It must be George Bush’s fault. It’s got to be. Right? How else could something like this happen? WAIT! I really think Carl Rove did it. No… No… No… it was Dick Cheney. He orchestrated the whole thing for his secret underground bunker.

Give me a break! Congress SUCKS and you know it. They should all be voted out.

Duncan Gibbs
10-24-2008, 04:53 PM
Help me understand this relationship between mega churches and Republicans.

The relationship is a statistical one: The number of mega-church attendees who vote republican vs the number of episcopalians/C. of E./Anglicans who vote democrat. Not rocket surgery ya know!

CK 17
10-24-2008, 05:00 PM
I just heard her on the radio this morning praying for god to put a new pipe line through Alaska.
God bless us everyone !

What happens to god's power when that pipeline hits the canadian border?

or should I ask: what happens to the pipeline when god's power hits the canadian border?

John of Phoenix
10-24-2008, 05:08 PM
What happens to god's power when that pipeline hits the canadian border?

or should I ask: what happens to the pipeline when god's power hits the canadian border?
Yeah, poor Godless Canadians.

JimD
10-24-2008, 05:48 PM
Yeah, poor Godless Canadians.

Let's not get sidetracked, now. The important thing to remember is if America wants God's protection you must vote Republican. The rest will sort itself out.

botebum
10-24-2008, 06:56 PM
Let's not get sidetracked, now. The important thing to remember is if America wants God's protection you must vote Republican. The rest will sort itself out.Typical godless response:rolleyes:

Doug

Scott Rosen
10-24-2008, 07:01 PM
Its all about logic. Someone who attends a megachurch was telling me that god created the universe which includes all the evidence that proves he didn't. Now there is some logic ANY republican can get behind.
I love that. You ever follow through with the dialog? Ask them WHY God would want to trick us. The answer: To separate the true believers from the damned.

And why would god want to make it impossible for rational, intelligent people to be saved? God gives you intelligence, then punishes you with eternal damnation for using it.

Is it really possible that humans are on the top of the evolutionary ladder? Oops. Evolution is a trick by God to lead us down the path of perdition. We are the result of intelligent design.

Intelligent Design!? Ha! I guess there's no product liability laws in heaven.

Flying Orca
10-24-2008, 07:03 PM
God hates Canada. I have it on good (http://www.godhatescanada.com/) authority.

Tom Montgomery
10-24-2008, 07:06 PM
Obama is a communist who started his political career in domestic-terrorist Bill Ayer's living room, who believes in Jeremiah Wright's Liberation Theology, who wants to raise everyone's taxes and spread the wealth around, and who was educated in an Indonesian madrasah.

I am so frightened.

http://www1.istockphoto.com/file_thumbview_approve/3397900/2/istockphoto_3397900-frightened-girl.jpg

Flying Orca
10-24-2008, 07:07 PM
I heard he wants to force Christians into gay marriages.

Flying Orca
10-24-2008, 07:08 PM
Or they say they love Him/Her/It/Them/whatever, anyway.

botebum
10-24-2008, 07:16 PM
He may hate the weather, but he loves 84% of the population.
So the website is mistaken? Only 16% of those nasty Canucks are fags? I'm gonna' get right to work figuring out which 16% of the Canadian forum members are fruits ... tomorrow.

Doug

botebum
10-24-2008, 07:28 PM
Gonna send them your pic and phone number?Nice shot:D:D

Doug

Flying Orca
10-24-2008, 07:39 PM
According to the Godless, God's a creation of man. If that's so, I guess they get to decide.

I don't follow - get to decide what?

paladin
10-24-2008, 07:52 PM
Naw....I got things covered.....Brother claims he has a direct line to God and Heaven, and he'll pray for me, and I'm guaranteed......if I tithe 10% of my income to his church...

Flying Orca
10-24-2008, 08:12 PM
Who God loves, of course.

OH! OK, I get it.

But they all disagree. :p

Frank Wentzel
10-24-2008, 09:35 PM
To the comment that many people who are voting for McCain are one dimensional thinkers I offer one of my brothers as an example. He agrees that the war in Iraq was a mistake and that planning to stay there long term (McCain's apparent plan) is a bad idea. He agrees that Republican economic policies are strongly biased to protect the rich at the expense of the middle class and he agrees with moderate to liberal views on most other subjects. He agrees that Palin is an idiot. However he is strongly for McCain/Palin because they are against abortion. In a discussion he agreed that antiabortion legislation will not work. He agreed that Mexican and Canadian abortion clinics as well as illegal abortion would simply become the norm. He also agrees that an amendment could never make it through congress let alone be ratified. But " because we have to make a statement" he feels he must support McCain. There is only one dimension to his politics even though he understands this should not be an issue decided by politics.

/// Frank ///

Memphis Mike
10-24-2008, 11:07 PM
To the comment that many people who are voting for McCain are one dimensional thinkers I offer one of my brothers as an example. He agrees that the war in Iraq was a mistake and that planning to stay there long term (McCain's apparent plan) is a bad idea. He agrees that Republican economic policies are strongly biased to protect the rich at the expense of the middle class and he agrees with moderate to liberal views on most other subjects. He agrees that Palin is an idiot. However he is strongly for McCain/Palin because they are against abortion. In a discussion he agreed that antiabortion legislation will not work. He agreed that Mexican and Canadian abortion clinics as well as illegal abortion would simply become the norm. He also agrees that an amendment could never make it through congress let alone be ratified. But " because we have to make a statement" he feels he must support McCain. There is only one dimension to his politics even though he understands this should not be an issue decided by politics.

/// Frank ///

There you have it.

CK 17
10-24-2008, 11:37 PM
God hates Canada. I have it on good (http://www.godhatescanada.com/) authority.

Jesus, that was a funny video:D

ucb4ume
10-25-2008, 06:32 AM
The relationship is a statistical one: The number of mega-church attendees who vote republican vs the number of episcopalians/C. of E./Anglicans who vote democrat. Not rocket surgery ya know!

You're right, it's not... rocket surgery?... or did you mean brain science?. :)

Anyway, Got any statistics on that? A link? A study? Any hard facts to back up your statement? Sorry, I'm just an ignorant Republican who can't make the unintuitive leap you've made without some real evidence to back it up.

George.
10-25-2008, 06:47 AM
God gives you intelligence, then punishes you with eternal damnation for using it.

Supposedly, he does the same with the naughty bits...

troutman
10-25-2008, 10:05 AM
Values my foot. Notice how those vitally important Reep issues of Gays, Guns and God went out the window when the retirement accounts went south. Nothing like the prospect of working till your 75 to focus the mind on important issues. McCain wouldn't have the nerve to bring those issues up and cringes evertime she does.

Duncan Gibbs
10-25-2008, 05:29 PM
Anyway, Got any statistics on that? A link? A study? Any hard facts to back up your statement? Sorry, I'm just an ignorant Republican who can't make the unintuitive leap you've made without some real evidence to back it up.

Lots of stuff... Sorry... Brain science on the subject! Here is but one article: (http://www.centerforpolitics.org/crystalball/article.php?id=AIA2008050101)


THE INCREDIBLE SHRINKING REPUBLICAN BASE
Societal trends reshaping the American electorate

By Alan I. Abramowitz
Guest Columnist

Discussions of the current political situation and comparisons between the 2008 election and earlier contests frequently overlook a crucial fact. As a result of changes in American society, today's electorate is very different from the electorate of twenty, thirty, or forty years ago. Three long-term trends have been especially significant in this regard: increasing racial diversity, declining rates of marriage, and changes in religious beliefs. As a result of these trends, today's voters are less likely to be white, less likely to be married, and less likely to consider themselves Christians than voters of just a few decades ago.

The combined impact of these trends on the composition of the electorate has been dramatic. Married white Christians now make up less than half of all voters in the United States and less than one fifth of voters under the age of 30. The declining proportion of married white Christians in the electorate has important political implications because in recent years married white Christians have been among the most loyal supporters of the Republican Party. In American politics today, whether you are a married white Christian is a much stronger predictor of your political preferences than your gender or your class -- the two demographic characteristics that dominate much of the debate on contemporary American politics.

Figure 1 displays the trends in the proportions of whites, married persons, and Christian identifiers in the U.S. electorate over the past half century according to data from the American National Election Studies. Between the middle of the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st century, the proportion of whites has fallen by about 15 percentage points, the proportion of married persons has fallen by about 25 percentage points, and the proportion of Christian identifiers has fallen by about 10 percentage points.

Figure 1. The Changing Social Characteristics of the American Electorate: Race, Religion, and Marital Status since the 1950s

http://www.centerforpolitics.org/crystalball/content/images/AIA050108-01.gif
Source: NES Cumulative File.

Married individuals still make up a large majority of the electorate, whites are still close to 80 percent of the electorate, and Christians are still over 80 percent of the electorate. However, the combined impact of the changes illustrated in Figure 1 has been enormous. Married white Christians have gone from close to 80 percent of the electorate in the 1950s to just over 40 percent of the electorate in the first decade of the 21st century. Moreover, the data displayed in Figure 2 show that the decline in married white Christians has been even more drastic among younger Americans. The proportion of married white Christians among voters under the age of 30 has plummeted from almost 80 percent in the 1950s to less than 20 percent in the first decade of the 21st century.

Figure 2. The Decline of Married, White Christians in the U.S. Electorate since the 1950s

http://www.centerforpolitics.org/crystalball/content/images/AIA050108-02.gif

Source: NES Cumulative File.

These changes in the social composition of the American electorate are politically significant because married white Christians now constitute the core of the Republican electoral coalition. Not only are married white Christians more likely to support the GOP than other Americans, but, as the data displayed in Figure 3 show, the gap between these two groups has widened from less than 10 percentage points in the 1950s to 25 percentage points in the first decade of the 21st century.

Figure 3. A Growing Gap: Republican Identification among Married White Christians and Other Voters since the 1950s

http://www.centerforpolitics.org/crystalball/content/images/AIA050108-03.gif

Source: NES Cumulative File.

Even though married white Christians have been shrinking as a proportion of the American electorate, the Republican Party has been able to maintain and even slightly increase its share of the electorate since the 1960s by steadily increasing its support among married white Christians. The data in Figure 3 show that between the 1950s and the first decade of the 21st century, Republican identification among married white Christians increased by more than 20 percentage points, going from about 40 percent to over 60 percent. However, the ability of the GOP to continue to offset the diminishing size of its married white Christian base by making further gains among this group is questionable. Republican gains among married white Christians have occurred almost entirely among self-identified conservatives. Between the 1970s and the first decade of the 21st century, Republican identification among conservative married white Christians increased by 26 points, going from 64 percent to 90 percent, according to NES data. During the same time period, Republican identification among moderate married white Christians increased by only five points, going from 38 percent to 43 percent and Republican identification among liberal married white Christians actually declined by 10 points, falling from 23 percent to 13 percent. These results suggest that the potential for additional Republican gains among married white Christians may be limited. Conservative married white Christians already overwhelmingly identify with the GOP and the party has had little success in increasing its support among moderate-to-liberal married white Christians.

The danger posed to the Republican Party by the declining size of its married white Christian base was clearly illustrated by the results of the 2006 midterm election. According to the 2006 national exit poll, married white Christians made up just under half of the midterm electorate and they voted for Republican House candidates over Democratic House candidates by a decisive 62 to 38 percent margin. However, voters who were not married white Christians made up just over half of the electorate and they voted for Democratic House candidates over Republican House candidates by an even more decisive 68 to 32 percent margin. The result was a big win for the Democrats in the midterm election.

In addition to the large gains made by Democrats in the House and Senate elections, another striking feature of the 2006 results was the presence of a fairly large generation gap within the electorate. As the data displayed in Table 1 show, voters under the age of 30 were considerably more likely to identify with the Democratic Party and vote for Democratic candidates than older voters. While the youth vote was not solely responsible for the Democratic victory in 2006, the party's 22 point advantage among voters under the age of 30 clearly contributed to the magnitude of that victory. [...]

Like I said, it aint rocket surgery!!! ;):p:D

Bill Lowe
10-25-2008, 05:42 PM
I am not a Democrat butI will vote for Barak Obama instead of an angry old man with a rich bitch and drug addict wife.

Memphis Mike
10-25-2008, 05:47 PM
I am not a Democrat butI will vote for Barak Obama instead of an angry old man with a rich bitch and drug addict wife.

Cindy looks like a skinny old crack head, doesn't she, Bill?:D

ucb4ume
10-26-2008, 07:29 AM
Thanks Duncan.

I read the article you posted, and it defiantly shows the changing demographics in the US. I don’t disagree with you on that point. If you will allow me to paraphrase, the article states that there is a decline in the Republican voting base of married, white Christians. Again, I don't disagree.

However, it doesn’t support your premise that MegaChruchs are made up primarily of Republicans and Episcopalians/Anglicans churches are made up primarily of Democrats.

Can you please point out where in the article your premise is supported? While your at it, can you point out where the article references MegaChurches and the correlation to Republicans?

Thanks so much.

Chris Coose
10-26-2008, 07:44 AM
I say that not all republicans are not like “Dude”.

What's that rule about double negatives? They both get tossed from the sentence, right?

Even then, I still disagree. I say Dude represents genius republicanism.

ucb4ume
10-26-2008, 09:56 AM
What's that rule about double negatives? They both get tossed from the sentence, right?

Even then, I still disagree. I say Dude represents genius republicanism.


I figured the grammar Nazis would catch me sooner or later. :D

That's why I haven't pointed out the misspelling and grammar errors in other posts in this thread.

Duncan Gibbs
10-26-2008, 04:00 PM
....Episcopalians/Anglicans churches are made up primarily of Democrats.

Yeah! That's the fly in the ointment of my premise! :rolleyes::D


Can you please point out where in the article your premise is supported? While your at it, can you point out where the article references MegaChurches and the correlation to Republicans?

That's a bit like a "sky is blue" theory doncha think. I reckon you'd be hard pressed to find many church patrons who identified as being Democrat.