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Dan McCosh
10-22-2008, 08:18 PM
Just watched a documentary on the Lady Juliana, one of the early convict ships that brought settlers to Sidney. Any descendants on the forum?

The Bigfella
10-22-2008, 08:36 PM
Dunno. My wife's ancestor was apparently the surgeon on the Second Fleet. Not sure which ship though.

rufustr
10-22-2008, 11:02 PM
My wife has an ancestor James Wright from the first fleet. and two from the second fleet.
I can only trace my family back to about 1840 or so.

WX
10-22-2008, 11:48 PM
No one in my family, my Mum was a Group Settlement Scheme Pom back in the 1920's in WA. My Dad was born in Durban South Africa and came out to WA in 1910 at the age of two. His Dad fought in the Boer War in the British army and ended up settling there for a while, till he decided Australia was a better option.

GaryK
10-23-2008, 12:02 AM
No one in my family, my Mum was a Group Settlement Scheme Pom back in the 1920's in WA. My Dad was born in Durban South Africa and came out to WA in 1910 at the age of two. His Dad fought in the Boer War in the British army and ended up settling there for a while, till he decided Australia was a better option.

My tribe arrived in the 1890's, after convict transportation was abolished.

But I wouldn't characterise the Lady Juliana as the Australian Mayflower. One transported religious fanatics which to a certain extend defines American society today while the other was of unwilling convicts, which didn't result in a society of crime.

Wild Dingo
10-23-2008, 12:07 AM
Been here long time my mob yous white fellas all along be newfellas... like piccininni fellas yous mob :D

not my mums side thats for sure and me dad I wouldnt have a clue maybe some poor old Irish spud nicker got a ride over on one but then again I dont really care much either...

Were all here now so where we came from originally dont matter a whoot just what we do now that matters

Cheers
Shane

PeterSibley
10-23-2008, 02:36 AM
We're late arrivals too ,1890s to Oz from Cornwall to Burra Burra in SA to dig holes in the ground looking for copper .Mums side went to NZ in the 1890s and built houses .

GaryK
10-23-2008, 02:47 AM
We're late arrivals too ,1890s to Oz from Cornwall to Burra Burra in SA to dig holes in the ground looking for copper .Mums side went to NZ in the 1890s and built houses .

Actually, both maternal & paternal grandparents landed in Melbourne from Yorkshire and ..England somewhere.. in the 1890's. Dads side headed for the Kalgoorlie gold rush, Mum's side headed west for the land grants the WA colony was handing out. Cousins are still there, farming away..

seanz
10-23-2008, 04:06 AM
Just watched a documentary on the Lady Juliana, one of the early convict ships that brought settlers to Sidney. Any descendants on the forum?

I've got a book on the 2nd Fleet somewhere on the shelves but the name 'Lady Juliana' was nagging at me.....couldn't quite remember the significance......it's in Wikipedia though.
Nice one......Bastard!
:D


We're late arrivals too ,1890s to Oz from Cornwall to Burra Burra in SA to dig holes in the ground looking for copper .Mums side went to NZ in the 1890s and built houses .

Cuz?
Dads side of the family have a similar story, Cornwall to the copper mine in SA.
There are no known convict links in our family and I was free of 'The Stain' until I found out my Kiwi partner's family's ancestors were transported to NSW before they learned to behave themselves and then emigrated to NZ.

The Bigfella
10-23-2008, 04:17 AM
Ahh the power of Google...

.. wife's ancestor was surgeon on a convict ship which arrived in 1821... a ship called the John Bull.

Dad's line came in about a hundred years ago via NZ. His mother's side were here long before that. Mum's lot were here a fair while too - but I don't know how they got here.... Cedar getters up on the Dorrigo.

John B
10-23-2008, 04:23 AM
One of mine settled Penrith.. Emu hall an all that.

seanz
10-23-2008, 05:03 AM
What a coincidence....I found the book and it's "The Floating Brothel" by Sian Rees.
Knew I had it somewhere, now I can't remember if I read it or not........
:(
:)

PeterSibley
10-23-2008, 05:10 AM
Cuz?
Dads side of the family have a similar story, Cornwall to the copper mine in SA.
There are no known convict links in our family and I was free of 'The Stain' until I found out my Kiwi partner's family's ancestors were transported to NSW before they learned to behave themselves and then emigrated to NZ.

Apparently there was a big copper find in Canada a few years earlier , the copper price crashed and lots of unemployed miners heard of the joys of sunny Burra Burra :D....then on to Broken Hill .

I've got cousins all over NZ and now even Canada .From Dunedin north .

Dan McCosh
10-23-2008, 09:21 AM
My tribe arrived in the 1890's, after convict transportation was abolished.

But I wouldn't characterise the Lady Juliana as the Australian Mayflower. One transported religious fanatics which to a certain extend defines American society today while the other was of unwilling convicts, which didn't result in a society of crime.


According to the film, the Lady Juliana transported all women, mainly prostitutes and others convicted of petty crimes in England. The Crown apparently did not see pimping as a problem. Many succeeded in the new Australian society. One, who escaped a sentence of hanging at the age of 11, spawned a family that numbered 300 by the time she died in Australia. Seem like the odds of her being in someone's family tree are pretty good. Apparently the British were shipping convicts to America until the revolution ended the practice--then convicts were sent to Australia. Given a choice between the trip and hanging, many chose hanging.

In any case, it is a different view of the motives of immigrants and settlers.

GaryK
10-23-2008, 10:40 AM
According to the film, the Lady Juliana transported all women, mainly prostitutes and others convicted of petty crimes in England. The Crown apparently did not see pimping as a problem. Many succeeded in the new Australian society. One, who escaped a sentence of hanging at the age of 11, spawned a family that numbered 300 by the time she died in Australia. Seem like the odds of her being in someone's family tree are pretty good. Apparently the British were shipping convicts to America until the revolution ended the practice--then convicts were sent to Australia. Given a choice between the trip and hanging, many chose hanging.

In any case, it is a different view of the motives of immigrants and settlers.

Actually, I didnt realise till after I posted that it was the bloody whore ship. Incidently, people with hangable offenses were hanged, we got the thieves, pickpockets, Irish rebels etc.

Dan McCosh
10-23-2008, 10:48 AM
Actually, I didnt realise till after I posted that it was the bloody whore ship. Incidently, people with hangable offenses were hanged, we got the thieves, pickpockets, Irish rebels etc.

The woman (?)--i.e. the 11-year old--had been sentenced to death for stealing clothes from another child. Meanwhile, King George III had recovered from some kind of seizure, and while celebrating had commuted the pending hanging sentences to sending them out of the country. FWIW--there were some 250 hanging offences on the books in England at the time, which created the nickname "the bloody code" for common law. One of the hookers was on the ship, after she had stolen the clothes from a client who had passed out drunk and naked.

suzlizjohnson
01-28-2015, 11:26 PM
My Australian Grandchildren besides being "Mayflower" 1620 descendants on their mother's side, have no less than six convict ancestors on their father's paternal side. One of those convicts was Mary Anne née Weston (by marriage 1) Higgins; 2) Harrold; 3) Triffitt). She was aboard the Lady Juliana and was not a prostitute. She was in good company with many other women and some 50 children who were not prostitutes either. Mary travelled with her baby which she apparently had whilst in prison for shoplifting 37 yards of lutestring (that's a shimmery fabric that changes colours depending on the angle of light, used for women's ball gowns). She was married to a tailor and they were trying to eke out a living. When Mary Higgins left England she left her young son with her husband and her newborn daughter Ann went with her. The baby survived the voyage, only to catch something like typhus or dysentery and die at Sydney Harbour while her mother Mary was waiting transport to Norfolk Island..

The late Nigel Triffitt whose parents were descendants of Mary, as well, had this to say about the Lady Juliana and our Mary Higgins trials and tribulations: https://triffitt.wordpress.com/mary-higgins-lady-juliana-1789/ .

If you are interested in who Nigel Triffitt is refer to this link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nigel_Triffitt

Mary's name on register of the Lady Juliana: http://www.convictrecords.com.au/convicts/higgins/mary/68347

My grandchildren's line is thus:

1) Mary Anne Weston 1758 2nd Fleet "Lady Juliana"
married James Triffitt of the "Matilda" 1791. He is my favourite family convict! When he was a teenager he and his friend were caught "feloniously stealing and taking away one cask containing a quantity of rum AND one cork screw from a certain building called the Grand Stand situate in a common Pasture called the Hurn, and within the Parish of Saint Mary in Beverley" in other words the Beverly race track... Their son,
2) James Triffit 1794-1853 (a twin), married Lizzie Barnes
daughter of James Holland of the "Pitt" 1792 and Martha Edwards of the "Britannia" 1798. Lizzie's father was "indicted for stealing, ... diverse carpenters' tools, value 17s" and her mother we do not know why as yet... but she is one of two family convicts to receive "LIFE" at Hereford Assizes 17 Mar 1796..commuted to seven years. Their daughter:
3) Ann Triffitt 1816-1889 married her cousin William Frances Triffitt son of Thomas Triffitt and Mary Gordon Scattergood. Anne's father was the son of 2) James Triffitt and Mary Anne Weston; Anne's mother Mary, was the daughter of Dan Taylor "indicted for stealing on the 27 July last (year not known) ONE cotton handkerchief, value 10d from Joseph Daniel shopkeeper . . . and again indicted for stealing on the 25th July 25 copper halpence and a farthing from Robert Hall the green grocer". As yet don't know what ship he was on... Anne's mother, Mary, was the daughter of Janet Gordon of the "Royal Admiral 1792. Janet was sentences to LIFE at Inverness, Scotland in Sep 1789. She is missing from the register of the Royal Admiral however appears with other passengers of that ship aboard the "Pitt" taking convicts from Sydney to Norfolk Island. Their daughter:
4) Martha Louisa Triffitt (another twin), the eleventh child of 16 children, married Donald McDonald (born 1837) of the "Panama" 1853 who was travelling with his parents and some four or five siblings. This family whilst very poor, were immigrants, heading to Australia looking for a better life. Their daughter:
5) Evelyn McDonald was born in Tasmania in about 1890 and after retiring owned a boarding house in Sydney. She could sing and had a lovely voice. Her son:
6) Noel was born in 1911 and was married twice. By his 2nd wife he had:
7) My grandchildren's father who married my daughter, from Canada. My daughter through my mother's paternal line, is a descendant of the "Mayflower" 1620 passenger the Elder William Brewster by his daughter Patience.

S.V. Airlie
01-28-2015, 11:47 PM
Now that IS confusing!:) I have 3 fam. on the mayflower and I have trouble keeping track of them.

skuthorp
01-28-2015, 11:47 PM
William Cole came on the Scarbourough in the first fleet, his passage paid by the British government. Not long after release he moved from Sydney to Tasmania, and married a local, the name we have was Milly (Amelia). She died after several children and he married again. The family always referred to Milly as 'Chinese', a common euphemism.
William and wife 2 are buried in St David's park, Hobart. No mention however of Milly. But the name stuck and Amelia is still being used in some sections of the family.

suzlizjohnson
01-28-2015, 11:53 PM
My eldest granddaughter studied the first fleet in year four and she was so disappointed that she didn't have a first fleet ancestor... I warned her: "the Lady Juliana" 2nd fleet is so much more exciting!

JayInOz
01-29-2015, 12:40 AM
My wife has an ancestor James Wright from the first fleet. and two from the second fleet.
I can only trace my family back to about 1840 or so.

James Wright- happens to be my name too- and that of my great grandfather. Don't think that side of the family were convicts though. My great great grandfather on my Mums side came out as a convict after taking milk from a cow on the estate where he worked after his wife died, leaving him with three small children. He was pardoned in Australia for bravery but never allowed to return to England- and never found out what happened to those children. Also on my Mothers side was a Tom- partner of Lister- who found the first payable gold, and another Tom who built the first church west of the blue mountains at Byng- we still plant relos in the family cemetery there. JayInOz

JayInOz
01-29-2015, 12:47 AM
But the name stuck and Amelia is still being used in some sections of the family.

My second youngest is Amelia. I take credit for her being nearly six feet tall with blue eyes- but her red hair? Missus swears blind she never jumped the fence:) JayInOz

purri
01-29-2015, 01:20 AM
The history of Juliana is "interesting"...

First whitefella born here in my very extended mob was in 1794.

Dannybb55
01-29-2015, 06:23 AM
My tribe arrived in the 1890's, after convict transportation was abolished.

But I wouldn't characterise the Lady Juliana as the Australian Mayflower. One transported religious fanatics which to a certain extend defines American society today while the other was of unwilling convicts, which didn't result in a society of crime.

My family stepped off of the ship in 1630 to escape those religious fanatics in England. My family still has the house in East Sandwich, Mass. Even with Bill Nye ee aren't a pack of criminals. They mostly immigrated later.

John B
01-29-2015, 06:02 PM
I just googled lady Juliana, she was 2 1/2 years after the first fleet. I had a branch of family on that, something about the first white Australian born in the country, there's a book at home with it all in it.

Dan McCosh
01-30-2015, 10:46 AM
How did this thread get resurrected? Just curious.

Stiletto
01-30-2015, 06:43 PM
How did this thread get resurrected? Just curious.

Looking at the posting dates I'm guessing Suzlizjohnson came across it in a genealogical google search and posted here, thus resurrecting it.

WX
01-30-2015, 11:56 PM
Actually, I didnt realise till after I posted that it was the bloody whore ship. Incidently, people with hangable offenses were hanged, we got the thieves, pickpockets, Irish rebels etc.
Today we call them politicians.:D