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Canoez
10-17-2008, 08:04 PM
So, does anyone have any unusual uses for woodworking tools?

This one came to light around here recently...

SWMBO is working her way through a 10 pound bar of dark chocolate she got as a gift. This, however, is not necessarily bliss, as I discovered the other night. As I came into the kitchen I was treated to the following scene: There is a glass of red wine on the counter and she is hunched over this massive bar of chocolate with what looks to me at first like a knitting needle trying to poke rows of holes into the chocolate. From the noises she's making, this is an obvious effort physically and is beginning to become a frustration.

As I get a bit closer, I notice that she has one of my nice Teflon-covered shish-kebab skewers and is trying to stab rows of holes in the chocolate the way a stone mason drills holes in rock to cause a weak spot and break off a slab of the rock. This is, apparently, not a very successful method as the tip of the skewer is beginning to take on a very serious and permanent bend.

It is at this point that I decide to step in and save the cooking utensils.

Lemme see.

What can I use to break this monster up?

I've got a couple of axes, but they really aren't clean enough to do the trick.

My circular saw is sort of overkill and I'd probably spray chocolate dust everywhere.

I go and get my tool bag and retrieve this:

http://i37.tinypic.com/11r6j5x.jpg

After a wash with soap and water, I take a crack a the monster bar of chocolate. I get a cut no more than an eighth of an inch deep and the friction melts the chocolate dust, nearly freezing the saw in the chocolate bar.

Next.

http://i37.tinypic.com/2evamuw.jpg

Another quick trip over to the sink to wash my chisel in soap and water and I'm in business again. This time with much more success.

http://i34.tinypic.com/wgq6hz.jpg

It's certainly one way to keep the harmony in the house!

So - where have your woodworking tools been working? :D:D:D

sandingblock
10-17-2008, 08:37 PM
I went into the shed one afternoon to see that my father had been around and used my bandsaw to cut up some frozen meat.

Didn't even clean up after himself the old bugger.

Jonny.

Lew Barrett
10-17-2008, 09:00 PM
I use my table saw as a resting place for the other tools I'm not using!

Pugwash
10-17-2008, 09:05 PM
I have "Table saw as resting place" syndrome also.

It's a bugger when you have to use the table saw.:rolleyes:

All that crap you have to find a home for...

seanz
10-17-2008, 09:07 PM
I went into the shed one afternoon to see that my father had been around and used my bandsaw to cut up some frozen meat.

Didn't even clean up after himself the old bugger.

Jonny.

Could be worse.
I know a bloke that used a bench saw to cut up a carcass.

Phillip Allen
10-17-2008, 09:27 PM
I have "Table saw as resting place" syndrome also.

It's a bugger when you have to use the table saw.:rolleyes:

All that crap you have to find a home for...

that's called "horizontal surface abuse" on the other hand, a clean horizontal surface is an indication of a jammed sphincter...

TimH
10-17-2008, 09:29 PM
I just bought a Unisaw a year ago and it is within 5 minutes of being ready for action :)

Pugwash
10-17-2008, 09:49 PM
that's called "horizontal surface abuse" on the other hand, a clean horizontal surface is an indication of a jammed sphincter...

It's just a symptom of a small workshop.

:)

Lew Barrett
10-17-2008, 10:04 PM
In my case it suggests an exceptional lack of organization, but I like your answer better Pug.

Michael Beckman
10-17-2008, 10:11 PM
For chocolate, I think I would first try heating a knife to a high temperature first.

Canoeyawl
10-17-2008, 10:14 PM
I have a nice old adze (not a lipped adze) that makes the best digging tool I‘ve ever used…

boylesboats
10-18-2008, 02:03 AM
I cut up some frozen slab of baby back ribs with a sawzall.. What wrong with that?
Or mix some heavy batch of bread dough with a cordless drill....

Canoez
10-18-2008, 06:16 AM
For chocolate, I think I would first try heating a knife to a high temperature first.
Kinda ruins the chocolate. We did try that with our largest and heaviest chef's knife without much success. Don't forget that this bar of chocolate is over 2 inches thick and about as big as a cutting board!

Tylerdurden
10-18-2008, 06:19 AM
I cut up some frozen slab of baby back ribs with a sawzall.. What wrong with that?
Or mix some heavy batch of bread dough with a cordless drill....

Don't laugh I had to portion some frozen venison and it works like a charm. 14tpi is about right.;)

Bill Lowe
10-18-2008, 06:27 AM
Table saw benches
I have spent my life in and around boatyards, wood shops and the like and I have observed some standard rules. Rule #1 don't leave anything on the table saw. Rule #2 remove everything from the table saw before using it. Well its just a narrow rip move the stuff over a bit.

Milo Christensen
10-18-2008, 07:00 AM
Does anyone here know if a 40 tooth carbide saw blade can be resharpened after cutting a bunch of cement board?

boylesboats
10-18-2008, 07:22 AM
Don't laugh I had to portion some frozen venison and it works like a charm. 14tpi is about right.;)

You bet it does ;) very helpful "meat saw" in a pinch

Shang
10-18-2008, 07:31 AM
Does anyone here know if a 40 tooth carbide saw blade can be resharpened after cutting a bunch of cement board?

Uhuuu... probably the same place I sent mine after cutting a piece of stainless steel...

Next time you cut cement board invest in a few throw-away saw blades.
Oh, and wear a breathing mask, the dust from cement board is dangerous.

Mrleft8
10-18-2008, 08:29 AM
I once caught my mother using my best 1/4" chisel as a screwdriver...
Just last week I used the 30" Oliver bandsaw to chunk up that monster Smithfield ham into reasonable pieces...
At a summertime party, about 20 some years ago, it was determined that while all the ingredients for margaritas were at hand, there was no blender... Who just happened to have a drill, and a 2" spade bit? Me. Worked beautifully! :D

capt jake
10-18-2008, 08:40 AM
I recently chucked up a hydraulic pressure regulator in my wood lathe. I needed to cut the top off in order to rebuild it. It worked fine with a carbide scraper, but I had to go at it slowly.

Flying Orca
10-18-2008, 11:25 AM
At a summertime party, about 20 some years ago, it was determined that while all the ingredients for margaritas were at hand, there was no blender... Who just happened to have a drill, and a 2" spade bit? Me. Worked beautifully! :D

Love it. :D My mother is a phenomenal cook, and one of her fancy desserts is Dobos torte - many layers of white cake and mocha cream, essentially, with a hard candy syrup poured over the top. The candy layer can present candle installation issues when celebrating birthdays - cordless drill with 1/4" drill bit to the rescue!

James McMullen
10-18-2008, 12:10 PM
I like to store my extra paint and epoxy in layers on my hand tools to keep them warm in winter. Obscuring the brand name is an anti-theft device as well.

John Meachen
10-18-2008, 06:01 PM
It happened that quite a few years ago I worked for a company that customarily gave all employees a turkey at Christmas.Not all the recipients intended to eat their turkey at once and it was quite normal for a few to be stored in the walk in freezer on the premises.Occasionally the recipient of the turkey would leave the company and forget the turkey.On one such occasion a couple of fellows spotted an abandoned turkey and considered what to do with it.Roast turkey at the weekend was the decision and how to divide the frozen bird was the challenge.So it came to pass that on the Monday morning the bandsaw in the pattern shop was found to be spotless for no apparent reason.During the course of the next few days informal enquiries were made about who had cleaned up the machine as the turkey storage was not really a company issue.Word got back that the turkey had been passed through the blade after a good cleaning had occurred.The cutting had gone quite well but for the fact that most turkeys have the giblets packed in a bag as they usually form a major ingredient of gravy.The bag had been cut and the giblets had been splattered around the inside of the machine leading to another very thorough cleaning operation.I did not eat the turkey or clean the machine,just in case you were wondering.

WX
10-18-2008, 07:02 PM
I had a Mother in law use my adze to plant some trees once...luckily she didn't hit any rocks.

Ian McColgin
10-18-2008, 07:08 PM
Chisels used as screwdrivers or levers are an ever popular tool abuse. My double-bladed japanese pull saw once got drafted into use as a spatula for fried eggs. We're divorced but that did not factor in.

Not a wood tool, but when an artist partner took my nice big canvass shears to cut some sheet copper I about flipped.

SMARTINSEN
10-18-2008, 07:11 PM
I made a mallet like the one that you show a few years ago, but I don't use it in the shop anymore, and it ended up it in the kitchen to tenderize (smash) chicken fillets.

stevebaby
10-18-2008, 08:08 PM
Uhuuu... probably the same place I sent mine after cutting a piece of stainless steel...

Next time you cut cement board invest in a few throw-away saw blades.
Oh, and wear a breathing mask, the dust from cement board is dangerous.I tried to cut through a pair of aluminium handlebars, using my bandsaw.
Once.
Without realising that there was a steel insert at the centre of the bars.
Der.

L.W. Baxter
10-18-2008, 08:18 PM
I know a guy, actually a very accomplished woodworker, who decided to cut a few inches off a leather belt with a radial arm saw. I guess he was in a hurry? I dunno. Astonishingly bad decision making, in hindsight. Actually, not so good in foresight, either. He escaped serious injury.

The Bigfella
10-18-2008, 08:26 PM
Well, the old chainsaw comes in handy at times when the goat carcass doesn't fit in the hangi basket. A cousin at work.

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff112/igatenby/bbq1.jpg

I've been known to use a cheap 3/4" wood chisel to cut required sections out of old cars. It works a treat in areas that you aren't allowed to use power tools (eg car wrecking yards) and in areas that tinsnips cant get to.

boylesboats
10-19-2008, 03:41 AM
Hope they use veggie oil as bar oil?

David W Pratt
10-19-2008, 07:48 AM
Microplane to shave parmaesan cheese
Mallet older than I am to crush ice
Drill as mixer
Mapps torch to char peppers

David G
10-19-2008, 10:58 AM
Well, after reading all that, I don't feel like quite so much of an idiot for some of the things I've done with my tools. I think I'll still keep the worst of them private however. One rather innocuous one: I was once inspired to use a nice old lignum vitae mallet head and a flat rock to prop up the corner of a deck over the winter until I could replace the deck in nice Spring weather.


"Inspiration comes at the oddest times. Usually when you least expect it. When it does come, don't shrug it off... be inspired!" -- J.G. Blakeney

htom
10-19-2008, 11:06 AM
Microplane for zesting citrus rinds, and making mush of ginger and garlic, too. I just keep it in the kitchen.

Dan McCosh
10-19-2008, 11:47 AM
Using a nice sharp chisel to open paint cans.

Rex Fearnehough
10-19-2008, 01:01 PM
I laughed at the idea of using tools for other jobs than what they were made for.
I then went into the kitchen to make an espresso and realised that I'd been using a 1 1/4" gouge chisel as a coffee tamper for approx 1yr.
The handle fits the the coffee holder perfectly.

botebum
10-19-2008, 01:12 PM
A guy I know that builds fishing rods(not my brother, although he may do it too) uses a caulk gun for clamping cork rings during glue up for rod handles.
I've been known to use the front door for bending sheet metal while Tonya has found that the back door is handy as a shear:rolleyes:

Doug

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
10-19-2008, 05:23 PM
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=7Jv3Fo48wbo

The tool bit is near the end.

Paul Pless
10-19-2008, 05:37 PM
:eek: :eek: :eek:

Brian Palmer
10-19-2008, 08:09 PM
I used my band saw to cut up CDs that needed to be "shredded."

Brian

Canoeyawl
10-19-2008, 08:29 PM
I've been known to use the front door for bending sheet metal while Tonya has found that the back door is handy as a shear:rolleyes:
Doug
I'm laughing out loud, but I know it's not funny...

George Roberts
10-19-2008, 08:31 PM
I use my wife's office supplies around my shop - binder clips as clamps on small wood parts and such. So I don't mind so much if she uses my tools for odds and ends.

ChrisF
10-19-2008, 09:59 PM
Once worked in the carpentry shop of a yard where one guy was into country music and another was into heavy metal. They were always blasting their radios at each other. One day heavy metal's radio was nowhere to be found. An hour later country music goes down to the docks and when he comes back, there's his radio on the bandsaw table, neatly sliced in two.

S B
10-19-2008, 10:39 PM
Does anyone here know if a 40 tooth carbide saw blade can be resharpened after cutting a bunch of cement board?
Does it have any teeth left?

John B
10-19-2008, 10:50 PM
Once worked in the carpentry shop of a yard where one guy was into country music and another was into heavy metal. They were always blasting their radios at each other. One day heavy metal's radio was nowhere to be found. An hour later country music goes down to the docks and when he comes back, there's his radio on the bandsaw table, neatly sliced in two.
I know a guy who did that here except it was a no radio rule in the workshop. Gave the young fella one warning , next time it got zinged.

Keith Wilson
10-19-2008, 10:51 PM
I once used a jointer to trim my right thumbnail. I don't recommend it.

Henning 4148
10-20-2008, 02:19 PM
We use pliers a bit in the kitchen. Adjustable ones for cracking nuts, and cutting pliers for cutting hard liquorice.

Nothing works better ...

The Bigfella
10-20-2008, 02:38 PM
Not quite a woodworking tool, but my letter-opener is a filed down piece of WW1 shrapnel...

Tealsmith
10-21-2008, 09:11 AM
A 1.5" spade bit makes great jack-o-lantern eyeballs.

cs
10-21-2008, 09:48 AM
Last time I was activated and sent to Ft Campbell my wife decieded to trim the branches off the trees in the yard useing my circular saw. :eek: Luckly no serious injury was done.

Chad

johnwill
10-21-2008, 10:35 AM
A hand plane makes an excellent pencil sharpener.

ron ll
10-21-2008, 10:40 AM
Years ago I was in a crowded old neighborhood bar late one Saturday night, late enough that most of the patrons were somewhat enebriated. The barmaid/owner banged her hip on the end of the bar for the umpteenth time and proclaimed she had been meaning to shorten that end of the bar for years. Without further prompting, one of the regulars went out to his car and came back in with a chainsaw and proceded, with the owner's permission, to "shorten the bar" on the spot. Didn't bother to empty the shelves first either. To the great enjoyment of the patrons, the chainsaw went thru formica, naugahyde, plywood, boxes of detergent, etc. as the bar was shortened by about two feet. The air was filled with noise, smoke, sawdust, and powdered detergent, and a good time was had by all.

boylesboats
10-21-2008, 11:18 AM
Years ago I was in a crowded old neighborhood bar late one Saturday night, late enough that most of the patrons were somewhat enebriated. The barmaid/owner banged her hip on the end of the bar for the umpteenth time and proclaimed she had been meaning to shorten that end of the bar for years. Without further prompting, one of the regulars went out to his car and came back in with a chainsaw and proceded, with the owner's permission, to "shorten the bar" on the spot. Didn't bother to empty the shelves first either. To the great enjoyment of the patrons, the chainsaw went thru formica, naugahyde, plywood, boxes of detergent, etc. as the bar was shortened by about two feet. The air was filled with noise, smoke, sawdust, and powdered detergent, and a good time was had by all.

Sounded like Marcel and his talkin' chainsaw http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=REzBGgIdT1w&feature=related

David G
10-21-2008, 12:13 PM
I once used a jointer to trim my right thumbnail. I don't recommend it.

Yeah, Keith, you really should stick to a power plane for light work :eek:

David G
10-21-2008, 12:15 PM
Years ago I was in a crowded old neighborhood bar late one Saturday night, late enough that most of the patrons were somewhat enebriated. The barmaid/owner banged her hip on the end of the bar for the umpteenth time and proclaimed she had been meaning to shorten that end of the bar for years. Without further prompting, one of the regulars went out to his car and came back in with a chainsaw and proceded, with the owner's permission, to "shorten the bar" on the spot. Didn't bother to empty the shelves first either. To the great enjoyment of the patrons, the chainsaw went thru formica, naugahyde, plywood, boxes of detergent, etc. as the bar was shortened by about two feet. The air was filled with noise, smoke, sawdust, and powdered detergent, and a good time was had by all.

Let me guess... Ballard?

willmarsh3
10-21-2008, 12:40 PM
That was a good laugh... :)

I regularly use flat head screwdrivers as chisels, pry bars, and as a quick and dirty drill to make a hole in pine. Once I broke the blade off the screwdriver so it then became a paint stirrer.

cs
10-21-2008, 12:53 PM
Of course I have taken a putty knife to the grinder and turned it into a scrapper. I've also created "chisels" from broken screwdrivers.

Chad

ron ll
10-21-2008, 02:22 PM
For the twenty-some years that I owned my '51 Chev 1/2 ton pickup, the only ignition key was a screwdriver.