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Memphis Mike
10-08-2008, 10:56 PM
How many miles can I expect to get on Reserve with my new bike. As most of you know it's a Yamaha V Star 650. I'm trying to figure out the total range to a tank full. All I'm looking for here is a rough estimate. It's a 4.2 gallon tank.

Riding home tonight I had to put it on Reserve with 113 miles to this tank full.

Shang
10-08-2008, 11:06 PM
Oh, gosh...I dunno... How far is it from the scene of the accident to the Emergency Room...?

Phil Heffernan
10-08-2008, 11:16 PM
so you're gettin' about 28 mpg, the myth of great motorcycle fuel economy revealed (although that seems low, I get 35 mpg with my Sportster)...Still...

Fill up every 100 miles...That's the deal with your bike...running on reserve is risky, plus you're vulnerable to all the silt that is at the bottom of every tank...

IMO

PH

Phil Heffernan
10-08-2008, 11:17 PM
Oh, gosh...I dunno... How far is it from the scene of the accident to the Emergency Room...?

Typical useless bike paranoia...Is this always here because the WBF is mostly old farts?:p:p

Whatever happened to gronicles anyway?

PH

Shang
10-08-2008, 11:31 PM
Typical useless bike paranoia...Is this always here because the WBF is mostly old farts?:p:p

Whatever happened to gronicles anyway?

PH

Aw, com'on... we all know that with a bike it's not a question of WHETHER you'll crash, it's just a matter of WHEN...!

And how much meat you'll leave on the road,
"... Gronicles be damned! Never mind the mescaline, I want to RIDE...!"

I've mentioned before how well I remembered the nigh when I was laying there thinking, "Gee, I really love this bike..."
Unfortunately at the time I was laying in the middle of Interstate Eighty-One with the bike on top of me...

Memphis Mike
10-08-2008, 11:33 PM
so you're gettin' about 28 mpg, the myth of great motorcycle fuel economy revealed (although that seems low, I get 35 mpg with my Sportster)...Still...

Fill up every 100 miles...That's the deal with your bike...running on reserve is risky, plus you're vulnerable to all the silt that is at the bottom of every tank...

IMO

PH

Thanks Phil. A guy I know that has an identical bike told me he got around 160 miles to a tank full. That's why I was running low. I was trying to ascertain if he meant with or without the reserve.

Believe me, I didn't like it when it started running out and I had to reach for the fuel cock. I'll fill up from now on at 100 miles.

Memphis Mike
10-08-2008, 11:47 PM
Aw, com'on... we all know that with a bike it's not a question of WHETHER you'll crash, it's just a matter of WHEN...!

And how much meat you'll leave on the road,
"... Gronicles be damned! Never mind the mescaline, I want to RIDE...!"

I've mentioned before how well I remembered the nigh when I was laying there thinking, "Gee, I really love this bike..."
Unfortunately at the time I was laying in the middle of Interstate Eighty-One with the bike on top of me...

BTW Shang, I'm not really the type of guy that runs a trailer guide through the hull of his Chris Craft.:p:rolleyes:

Phil Heffernan
10-08-2008, 11:48 PM
Aw, com'on... we all know that with a bike it's not a question of WHETHER you'll crash, it's just a matter of WHEN...!

And how much meat you'll leave on the road,
"... Gronicles be damned! Never mind the mescaline, I want to RIDE...!"

I've mentioned before how well I remembered the nigh when I was laying there thinking, "Gee, I really love this bike..."
Unfortunately at the time I was laying in the middle of Interstate Eighty-One with the bike on top of me...

It's not a matter of WHETHER you'll die, it's just a matter of WHEN :p

Sorry pal, I've learned that survival in any motor vehicle is a question of judgement over luck, and all forms of motorized transport carry risk...

So don't lecture about my inevitable demise, I've ridden safely for too long to be scared off by the fears of amateurs:p

PH

coelacanth2
10-08-2008, 11:51 PM
Regular fill-ups are a good thing. If you really want to know, disconnect the hose to the carb, drain it into a measured container - that's your main. Then turn the cock to reserve - that's your reserve. usually about 20 miles, YMMV and walking to the nearest station is rarely any fun ... I should know:rolleyes:

The Bigfella
10-08-2008, 11:53 PM
Google is your friend. Total fuel 4.3 gal - includes 0.9 gal reserve

The Bigfella
10-08-2008, 11:56 PM
You got 26 mpg - leaving 24 miles in reserve. Riding style makes a BIG difference.

Memphis Mike
10-09-2008, 12:04 AM
You got 26 mpg - leaving 24 miles in reserve. Riding style makes a BIG difference.

That's 137 miles total. That's the kinda answer I was looking for Big Guy.

BTW, these were all city miles and the bike really isn't broken in good yet. Will it improve?

The Bigfella
10-09-2008, 12:13 AM
Yep

Memphis Mike
10-09-2008, 12:15 AM
Yep

Thanks. Then my friend with the same bike wasn't really too far off. His bike is broken in.

botebum
10-09-2008, 12:17 AM
You won't get the same mpg with Paris riding bitch but how far can it be to the nearest motel?;)

Doug

LeeG
10-09-2008, 01:06 AM
My dream Honda 250 would do better...heck a Honda Fit gets 28mpg.

David G
10-09-2008, 01:10 AM
My Honda CB400 gets 25 - 30 mpg. My new '09 Honda Fit gets 30 -36 so far. Guess which I'll be driving all winter.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
10-09-2008, 02:28 AM
My dream Honda 250 would do better...heck a Honda Fit gets 28mpg.

I rode a Honda 250 Superdeam - a truly horrible thing - they started life as a nice 400cc twin and then, specially for the Brit market, fitted smaller holes and matching pistons.

Gutless overweight pig of a bike - horsepower shortages held together with flat spots. Making progress meant keeping the tach between 8K and 10K and rowing it along with the gearlever.

Gave it away.

The Bigfella
10-09-2008, 02:31 AM
I rode a Honda 250 Superdeam - a truly horrible thing - they started life as a nice 400cc twin and then, specially for the Brit market, fitted smaller holes and matching pistons.

Gutless overweight pig of a bike - horsepower shortages held together with flat spots. Making progress meant keeping the tach between 8K and 10K and rowing it along with the gearlever.

Gave it away.

I was having a bit of a blast with a mate on one of those when I had my "big one" back as a 17 year old. He was so far behind my 250 Suzuki, he didn't see me fall off. They were slugs

Tom M.
10-09-2008, 02:38 AM
So don't lecture about my inevitable demise, I've ridden safely for too long to be scared off by the fears of amateurs:p

PH

Heheh, you tell em Phil.

By the way Mike, you mileage really sucks. Just so you know. A bike like that ought to get 45 MPG when ridden in town normally. I have a buddy with the same bike. I'll ask him what he gets.

LeeG
10-09-2008, 02:40 AM
seriously? is the 2008 version the same?

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
10-09-2008, 02:45 AM
seriously? is the 2008 version the same?

No idea - the "Dream" badge has been stuck to a wide variety of different bikes - most have been fine machines. the '79 to '81 "Superdream" was a horror but the late sixties TBone frame ohc twin was a gem....

The Bigfella
10-09-2008, 02:57 AM
It would have been the late sixties -early seventies one my mate had, lots of revs, lots of noise, not much go.

LeeG
10-09-2008, 03:00 AM
given my 300watt granola fed motor a 250 would be more than enough for me.

rddrappo
10-09-2008, 03:06 AM
Check your owner's manual, it should tell you the reserve capacity. Figure out your mpg, and you've got the numbers. Of course, I am a believer that you'll never truly know how far a tank will carry you until you run out. You can always tilt the bike since the fuel line is attached to one side of the tank and some gas gets trapped on the other side. You can usually squeeze a couple more blocks out of it. Don't ask me how I know!

pipefitter
10-09-2008, 03:12 AM
The sediment from running on a low tank is kind of false. The feed is at the lowest point in the tank and the same goes for cars which is why there is a screen on the pickup tube and the same goes for permanent boat tanks. If there was any amount of sediment, it would end up there anyway. The petcock on my last bike had a fine screen on it, plus an inline fuel filter. As a part of maintenance, I would remove the petcock and clean the tank since there was only one bolt under the seat and two rubber cup snubbers in the front as I took it off to clean the rest of the frame under there anyway.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
10-09-2008, 03:15 AM
The lesson I took from that Honda was that if you want a 250 - buy a bike designed as a 250.

There was in the UK at that time a wrinkle in the licence law - a beginner could ride a 250cc bike without passing any test - so kiddies wanted the biggest flashiest fastest 250 they could have.
Many manufacturers took a 350-400 cc machine and bored it for 250cc - instant overweight.
Honda as the only big player using four-stroke motors then went for carbs and cam timing suited to maximum horsepower rather than control and ease of use...

Many of the bikes in the 175-200cc category made better daily transport.

PeterSibley
10-09-2008, 04:22 AM
so you're gettin' about 28 mpg, the myth of great motorcycle fuel economy revealed (although that seems low, I get 35 mpg with my Sportster)...Still...


PH

My Enfield , chuff ,chuff , gets 100mpg imperial if I gentle it , 75 otherwise .If I really tried I could get down to 60 ....maybe :D

Andrew Craig-Bennett
10-09-2008, 05:20 AM
I rode a Honda 250 Superdeam - a truly horrible thing - they started life as a nice 400cc twin and then, specially for the Brit market, fitted smaller holes and matching pistons.

Gutless overweight pig of a bike - horsepower shortages held together with flat spots. Making progress meant keeping the tach between 8K and 10K and rowing it along with the gearlever.

Gave it away.

Had the 400. Nice commuter bike.

However, the 60 mpg that I got out of it is in line with 60 mpg that I am getting out of my 1.8 litre diesel estate car. (I concede some differences in driving / riding style...)

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
10-09-2008, 05:23 AM
Thanks Phil. A guy I know that has an identical bike told me he got around 160 miles to a tank full. That's why I was running low. I was trying to ascertain if he meant with or without the reserve.
This depends - on how you ride and where, and how far at a time - lots of stop-start in towns will drink fuel far faster than a steady cruise on open highway...



Believe me, I didn't like it when it started running out and I had to reach for the fuel cock. ...

Oh Yes - as a youngster I once ran it onto reserve in the upslope of this bridge....
http://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/queensferry/forthroadbridge/images/bridge-450.jpg

Kinda panicky moment.




Had the 400. Nice commuter bike.

However, the 60 mpg that I got out of it is in line with 60 mpg that I am getting out of my 1.8 litre diesel estate car. (I concede some differences in driving / riding style...)

Wonderful demonstration - I spent four years with a similar turbo diesel estate - but pulling short hops inside Milton Keynes - 30mpg.

And an average of 7K miles per set of front tyres.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
10-09-2008, 05:28 AM
The sediment from running on a low tank is kind of false. The feed is at the lowest point in the tank and the same goes for cars which is why there is a screen on the pickup tube and the same goes for permanent boat tanks. If there was any amount of sediment, it would end up there anyway. The petcock on my last bike had a fine screen on it, plus an inline fuel filter. As a part of maintenance, I would remove the petcock and clean the tank since there was only one bolt under the seat and two rubber cup snubbers in the front as I took it off to clean the rest of the frame under there anyway.

My Changjiang 750 was gem of Communist Engineering. There was a fine brass gauze filter in the tank filler, and of course another one in line after the fuel cock to catch the remaining sand en route to the tickle carburetter.

garland reese
10-09-2008, 07:06 AM
Hey Mike,
Fuel mileage does vary with bikes, depending a lot on driving habits. I get in the middle 30s around town with my V Star 1300. Some guys are reporting low 50s for highway miles (best I've done is around 44mpg). Your mileage does seem low for the 650. I've gotten 32 miles, after my fuel indicator came on..... I was sweating it, hoping for a station, as the spec'd reserve is .7! Won't get myself caught like that again.
I'm glad you're liking the bike.
If you can find pure gas locally, use it. Mileage will likely be noticeably better. I can tell the difference between the 10% ethanol stuff and pure gasoline. I get some popping on decel with the ethanol. I think soon I'll not be able to find the 100% gasoline. Bummer.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
10-09-2008, 07:12 AM
Wonderful demonstration - I spent four years with a similar turbo diesel estate - but pulling short hops inside Milton Keynes - 30mpg.

And an average of 7K miles per set of front tyres.

Milton Keynes - home of the roundabout, than which nothing wears out tyres faster! 20K on the fronts, maybe 60K on the rears

You know, I seem to remember that I could put the Super Dream into top and it would poodle along down a country lane very happily at 30, which surprised me for a small parallel twin. I also seem to recall that the clutch never got much use.

Wayne Jeffers
10-09-2008, 07:53 AM
Less than 30 mpg on a 650 is terrible. I would expect this result from a big cruising/touring bike.

Back in the 1980ís I rode a Suzuki GS-450 and I got about 70 mpg if I rode sensibly and about 60 if I did not.

I would say the bike could benefit from a main sprocket with one or two more teeth.

Wayne

Chris Coose
10-09-2008, 08:10 AM
Fill up and set the odometer to 0000.
You run it till it coughs.
Turn on the reserve.
Look at and remember the odo number.
Fill up as soon as you can.
A little before you get to the number you've remembered get more gas.

Don't even think about mileage computation. Too messy and not much you can do about it.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
10-09-2008, 08:45 AM
...

You know, I seem to remember that I could put the Super Dream into top and it would poodle along down a country lane very happily at 30, which surprised me for a small parallel twin. I also seem to recall that the clutch never got much use.

I had a girlfriend who owned one of the early 400cc twin Dreams - the round-tank model which followed the much loved 400/4 - this was a very nice middleweight indeed.
Decent fuel mileage, clean stable handling, adequate performance, a class of bike which has more or less vanished.
http://www.hoc.org.uk/gallery/bikes/CB400T_1978(1).jpg

Shang
10-09-2008, 08:52 AM
BTW Shang, I'm not really the type of guy that runs a trailer guide through the hull of his Chris Craft.:p:rolleyes:

Sheech...! I'm never going to live that down...

Shang
10-09-2008, 08:52 AM
Oh, and for the record...
I really envy you and your bike, MMike.

Leon m
10-09-2008, 08:53 AM
BTW Shang, I'm not really the type of guy that runs a trailer guide through the hull of his Chris Craft.:p:rolleyes:

Oooooohhhh....BURN !!!

Popeye
10-09-2008, 09:08 AM
my car has a roof and a heater

Andrew Craig-Bennett
10-09-2008, 12:04 PM
I had a girlfriend who owned one of the early 400cc twin Dreams - the round-tank model which followed the much loved 400/4 - this was a very nice middleweight indeed.
Decent fuel mileage, clean stable handling, adequate performance, a class of bike which has more or less vanished.
http://www.hoc.org.uk/gallery/bikes/CB400T_1978(1).jpg


I suppose the nearest thing is Peter's Indian Enfield - a bike which these bikes replaced!

A pity, as if they were made now, I would probably buy one. I like sensible middleweight motorcycles.

Maybe the recession will bring them back?

Memphis Mike
10-09-2008, 12:10 PM
I don't know why the mileage was so low unless it's just not broken in yet. All of my rinding on that tank was done in town at speeds of 50 and below. Mostly 30 to 40mph.

Robmill0605
10-09-2008, 12:18 PM
My bike is a 2001 Suzuki 1500LC. The manual states it holds 4.1 gallons. There is no reserve, which really drives me nuts. Instead, it has a blinking light that the manual says you have .7 gallons leftwhen it blinks. It's a great bike, but every time the light comes on, I'm never sure just how far I'll get. The last time, I ran it about 20 miles blinking. When I filled the tank, it took 3.7 gallons to top it. I usually can go about 125 miles before I chicken out to see when enough is on enough.
I guess that's not too bad, since the bike weighs 700lbs and I'm another 360, but having no actual reserve tank sucks.

Memphis Mike
10-09-2008, 12:22 PM
Now I'm thinking something else happened with it. I just went out and flipped it off of reserve and started it up and let it run for a few minutes and it didn't quit.

It wasn't raining last night but it was really damp. I had to wipe the condensation off the seat before I sat down. I wonder if moisture could have had something to do with it.

I took the fuel cap off and visibly it is low on fuel but I can see gas in the bottom of the tank.

Memphis Mike
10-09-2008, 12:38 PM
Nope, it's definately out. I just tried it again with the fuel cock set to on and it ran out. Maybe I didn't get it good and full when I filled it up.

Oh well, I guess I'll just fill up after work today and see how it does.

PatCox
10-09-2008, 12:41 PM
My old bike, a CB 350, early 70s, maybe 1973:

http://www.honda350k.com/cbk3_rl.jpg

BrianW
10-09-2008, 01:29 PM
Oh Yes - as a youngster I once ran it onto reserve in the upslope of this bridge....
http://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/queensferry/forthroadbridge/images/bridge-450.jpg

Kinda panicky moment.


We hit a serious thunderstorm halfway across that bridge, and me with barely a couple hours under my belt driving on the wrong side of the car and highway.

Yep, a panicky moment. (where's that wiper switch?) :)

R.I.Singer30
10-09-2008, 01:56 PM
Hi Mike,
Bike fuel tanks usually have a fuel connector line from one side of the tank to the other so if you put it into reserve fuel flows back to the main,thus a small amount of fuel will go to the main and run it for a short time.My bike (Beemer) has a petcock on both sides pf the tank so I have ,sort of, two reserves. The small one will only get me a couple of miles ,the main about 35 depending on how I'm driving.

David G
10-09-2008, 02:12 PM
Wow, does THAT bring back memories. Around the same year, a friend in my engineering classes owned one of those... and we both travelled from Boston to NYC on it, with me riding bitch. 350's used to be considered 'big' bikes back then... nowadays, something that size would be considered a started bike for a novice rider.

They may be quaint and antiquated, but I still like the early 70's Honda styling.

That's funny. Indeed, I started out when I was 12 - riding little bitty Hondas & Suzukis - 80 & 90 cc's. Thought I was James Dean!

I also like the styling of the older bikes. I'm still tickled by the looks of my CB400. Don't have any good fotos, but here's a stock image. Mine's yellow.

http://www.sohc4.net/index.php?title=Image:Cb400f.jpg


"Pride is a powerful narcotic, but it doesn't do much for the auto-immune system" -- Northern Exposure

rddrappo
10-09-2008, 02:14 PM
You could always fill it all the way, run it until it dies, switch to reserve and go until it quits, then you know how far you can go on reserve. Take a water bottle full of gas with you. That should be enough to get you to the next gas station. I carry two in my saddlebags when I do long trips.

Bill Thompson
10-09-2008, 05:40 PM
My 1980 CB 400T (known as the Honda Hawk in the States) was a good bike - I bought it at the West Memphis Honda dealer (name escapes me now) in July of that year. Typically it would get low to mid 50 MPG.
After I moved to the PNW in the late 90's, I was going to garage and yard sales, and buying Honda CB 110's, CB 160/175's, 250's, 350's (2 cylinder) for $25 to $50 a bike. "Just it out of the garage, basement, etc". (The absolutely best bike buy was an immaculate CB 450 twin with the "hairpin" valve springs - wish I had kept that bike). Often the title was long gone, didn't run, some rust, and dry rotted tires. But all problems fairly easily resolved - usually the person that I bought the bike from was the last registered owner. Cleaning the carbs did wonders in the starting department - small bike batteries used to fairly inexpensive, some of the Asian tires were OK and cheap. Too much rust? - part out the bike.
However, as a reflection of my business skills, I wasn't making much money even when I zero-ed out my hours. Its a lot of work to be in the used (fill in the blank (boat, truck, car, plane, etc) part market place. Marketing/selling the parts is the biggest time consumer - the part where I am least interested and capable. So anyway I sold off all my Honda stock ("Just it out of the garage") to a VME member about 2004.

The Bigfella
10-09-2008, 07:12 PM
Just to give an idea of how much difference riding / driving style can make to your gas mileage - the best mileage I've got out of my M5 was 24 mpg (US) on a 600 mile highway trip, cruising along at around 60mph.

The worst mileage - over about 100 miles, flat out on a racetrack - revving to the redline every shift, full-on braking, etc was 6 mpg (US)

So - it gets between 6 mpg and 24 mpg - depending on how I drive it.

Bobcat
10-09-2008, 07:17 PM
Range has too many factors to be much use to determine reserve. My bikes vary greatly in mileage depending how I use them. Headwinds can also kill your mileage. Short commutes do not help because the engine does not warm up enough to run efficiently.

I just figure my reserve range based on the worst mileage I have ever gotten on a particular bike. I also get gas as soon as I can.

One final note, you can go a lot of miles on tight butt muscles when you're in the middle of nowhere and next town that might have gas is a long way away.

Memphis Mike
10-09-2008, 07:19 PM
All of the reviews I've read about my bike claim that it gets between 38 and 45 miles a gallon. I'm thinking that I didn't get it filled all the way up the last time. I just refilled the tank and reset the trip meter so we'll see.

garland reese
10-09-2008, 07:34 PM
I wonder how much gas is wasted by mindless revving of the engine while waiting at intersections and such.

There is no need to do such things with a Star motorcycle. They idle very well.
Some HD guys seem to think their bike is going to die at idle, I think ;) but that is just the HD idle happening...... differences in motor design I reckon.

rddrappo
10-09-2008, 08:33 PM
All of the reviews I've read about my bike claim that it gets between 38 and 45 miles a gallon. I'm thinking that I didn't get it filled all the way up the last time. I just refilled the tank and reset the trip meter so we'll see.

You have to actually pull the fuel nozzle almost all the way out of the tank to properly fill it. You can't just shove it in and let it go like a car. The tank is too shallow for that.

Yeah, us HD guys do tend to be a little hard on the throttle at idle. I was that way when I first got the bike, now I've outgrown the need to show off (most of the time).