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View Full Version : Survivorman, les stroud off the grid



Tylerdurden
09-03-2008, 06:09 AM
Awesome!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wg7EaLIJrBw

seanz
09-03-2008, 06:19 AM
Awesome!


Aww c'mon.
You've got to give us dial-up bunnies more that just one word.
Is this as good as Steve Irwin?
Is it as hilarious as watching Man vs Wild and Bear Grylls nearly being eaten by sharks after he puts to sea on a raft he made out of bamboo and bark lashing?

Tylerdurden
09-03-2008, 06:36 AM
He moves his family off into the woods and rebuilds a 1930's farm camp to live off grid.

I think this will do more to keep people from trying it. He had overwhelming assistance and money to get things done. I have spent 25 years learning the skills to do such a thing and I can tell you without a solid income stream its next to impossible unless one gets back completely. There is a lot to it and he shows with children it is possible but it comes from the yuppie/enviro perspective. I would like to see more on sustainable on a community level or living cheaply in that environment. The one thing that happens here is the visit from the building inspector which is the greatest hurdle I have encountered in the lifestyle. Building inspectors are more often than not power crazy idiots who could not make it in the trades so to expect a moron to understand new concepts is damn near impossible. I find that the biggest hurdle in anything like this.
I can tell you story's about inspectors and the level of absolute stupidity they show. Couple that with the power to fine and stop work and you have the long arm of collectivism staring one in the face.

As far as off the grid, Les shows a complete and utter lack of understanding of how that works and he relies on others not to teach him conservation but to give him what he thinks he needs. The fact that contractors did 90% of the work shows what and absolute failure his ideas will prove to be if he has to count on true self reliance.

Tylerdurden
09-03-2008, 07:36 AM
Exactly Rich. Good to see I am not the only one who sees through the bulll****e.

Wayne Jeffers
09-03-2008, 08:34 AM
I also liked the part where he couldn’t afford $10K for a drilled well, (while he was having materials for the cabin flown in by helicopter in a vain attempt to beat the onset of winter) so instead he bought all kinds of fancy gadgetry to make collected rainwater safe to drink and hired a backhoe to rip up about half an acre (it seemed) to make a dug well.

Les: Drill a proper well and you won’t have to process the water within an inch of its life. Use the rainwater (if you must) for laundry, toilets, . . . anything but drinking. And forget the BS.

Wayne

Popeye
09-03-2008, 08:46 AM
heavily laden trucks get stuck in muck , easily

Wayne Jeffers
09-03-2008, 08:51 AM
Yeah, he would have had to wait until dry weather. Helicopters make better video, I guess.

A curious way of going back to nature.

Wayne

paladin
09-03-2008, 08:55 AM
depending on the soil etc....he could drive a well point down, but that would require work.

Tylerdurden
09-03-2008, 08:56 AM
depending on the soil etc....he could drive a well point down, but that would require work.

Exactly!

Saltiguy
09-03-2008, 09:02 AM
Back in the hippie days, a friend of mine went to the Maine woods to get away from "the man". He went up there with a chainsaw and some tools and built a servicable log cabin with a wood stove. Met a little hippie girl and they did OK. They grew veggies, did some hunting and fishing and rarely went to "town" - a little crossroads store 25 miles away. What made his life possible was that he was a skilled machinist and there was a construction company in the area who always needed work done, so he could go to their shop any time he wanted, do as much or as little machine work as he wanted, and get paid in cash. Over the years, he expanded the cabin, added a real toilet and lived there for almost 40 years until he died of a heart attack. No electricity.

Wayne Jeffers
09-03-2008, 09:02 AM
depending on the soil etc....he could drive a well point down, but that would require work.

He said it was all solid bedrock a few feet down (which would require drilling.) Given the stated location (Canadian shield) I'll take him at his word on this one.

Wayne

Wayne Jeffers
09-03-2008, 09:16 AM
Another thing that was kinda puzzling to me: They kept complaining about the cost of electricity (“hydro”) as if that were a big motivator.

If they want to go “back to the land,” that’s their choice. But it is not something most people will do to save $100 a month.

I’ve known a number of people who live off the grid. Solar panels, batteries, etc. They mostly get by with using very little electricity. If I wanted to reduce my electricity use that much, I would probably pay $20 or $30 a month for electricity.

There may be many valid reasons to live in the woods away from the grid. To me, saving money on electricity does not figure large in the equation.

Now if I could eliminate the bill I pay each month for phone/DSL, that may be worth considering. ;)

Wayne

Tylerdurden
09-03-2008, 09:20 AM
You have that right Wayne. Its far cheaper to conserve from the meter than to pay many dollars a watt to install solar and wind.
My primary battery bank charges off the grid to give me a week on battery's and inverter. The option of going solar and wind has more to do with bragging rights than common sense.

Popeye
09-03-2008, 09:24 AM
you can also supply the grid if you want (your meter runs backwards) and the power company sends you a nice cheque

it's good to share