PDA

View Full Version : Cockpit drain hose choice materials?



redbopeep
08-22-2008, 01:31 PM
Our old cockpit drains were lead pipes with no seacocks. Just put in the seacocks. Gotta buy the hose (1.5" and 2"). So, what's your favorite hose for this use?

Thanks!

S/V Laura Ellen
08-22-2008, 01:41 PM
Good question.
I'm in the exact same situation, with the same question.
I was thinking about using a polyester reinforced clear PVC tubing.
http://images.westmarine.com/full/328999.jpg

Andrew Craig-Bennett
08-22-2008, 01:42 PM
Been there, done that thing, got the T shirt, as the Aussies say. ;)

I replaced lead pipes (and seacocks which had been open for 33 years, because the previous owner had had the boat that long and, never having looked under the cockpit, did not know they were there) with Blakes seacocks and ordinary thick green plastic spiral reinforced plastic hose as used on the suction side of bilge pumps (yes, with two stainless Jubilee clips at each end). They have been there for twenty years now and they are still fine, so I reckon that is OK.

http://www.rainwatershop.co.uk/contents/media/l_Green%20Medium%20Duty.jpg

(Oh, you should have seen the old engine exhaust skin fitting - right on the waterline, no seacock and made of - wait for it - iron, copper and brass.

One tap with a hammer when laid up and it disintegrated in a cloud of rust coloured dust!)

paladin
08-22-2008, 01:46 PM
I love the Blakes Seacocks....and yes TWO hose clamps/jubilee clips per end, please.....and the best grade reinforced hose...change it in 5 years or so...just so that you can inspect the ends/fittings please....it could be embarrassing if you do not.....

Andrew Craig-Bennett
08-22-2008, 01:49 PM
I hear you, Chuck - I'll replace it this winter. Thanks for the tip.

Jim Ledger
08-22-2008, 02:00 PM
Why wouldn't you use exhaust hose? Wire reinforced, heavy rubber, tough, for what is essentially the outer skin of the boat.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
08-22-2008, 02:03 PM
Because it is not going to be handling hot gases and liquids and exhaust hose is a real swine to bend and fit in the sort of short, curved lengths that are typical of crossed over cockpit drains.

Concordia...41
08-22-2008, 02:38 PM
It might have been exhaust hose we used to replace the lead pipework that was removed. I'd have to look under the cockpit to see the markings on the hose, but it was definately heavier duty than the ones pictured above.

- M

Well, I actually found the pictures of our cockpit drain hose installation, but of course Shutterfly has taken this particular time to take a powder :mad: I'll try again in a bit...

Andrew Craig-Bennett
08-22-2008, 02:41 PM
This leads to the supplementary question - are your cockpit drain seacocks routinely open or closed?

Mine are kept closed unless sailing in heavy weather (when I close the engine exhaust seacock).

Some people leave theirs open on a mooring in order that rainwater will drain from the cockpit. I think this is a bad plan and it is better to fit a cockpit cover.

Jim Ledger
08-22-2008, 03:11 PM
Because it is not going to be handling hot gases and liquids and exhaust hose is a real swine to bend and fit in the sort of short, curved lengths that are typical of crossed over cockpit drains.

Maybe, but here's a piece of 1 3/4" in a sharp bend. A bit of an improvement over bilge pump hose. Might be overkill, but you'll never lose any sleep over it.

I keep the drains open.

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m193/searover1916/exhausthose.jpg

redbopeep
08-22-2008, 03:14 PM
This leads to the supplementary question - are your cockpit drain seacocks routinely open or closed?

Mine are kept closed unless sailing in heavy weather (when I close the engine exhaust seacock).

Some people leave theirs open on a mooring in order that rainwater will drain from the cockpit. I think this is a bad plan and it is better to fit a cockpit cover.

We're expecting to keep ours open. They are essentially "at" the waterline, btw. so not a lot of static head there.

S/V Laura Ellen
08-22-2008, 03:21 PM
Maybe, but here's a piece of 1 3/4" in a bit of a sharp bend. A bit of an improvement over bilge pump hose. Might be a bit of overkill, but you'll never lose any sleep over it.

I keep the drains open.

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m193/searover1916/exhausthose.jpg

Thanks Jim:
My decision is made, Shieldsflex II it is.

Concordia...41
08-22-2008, 03:52 PM
With little or no help from cursed Shutterfly, here's SARAH's bilge pre-engine installation :)....

http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47b8d603b3127ccec4b8b1c65f1800000040O08BYtG7lsxbg9 vPhA/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D480/ry%3D320/

http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47b8d603b3127ccec4b9c5767fde00000040O08BYtG7lsxbg9 vPhA/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D480/ry%3D320/

When we did the installation (and these pictures were posted), we got some negative feedback about the 1" hose nippled off the elbow below the seacock. Frankly, considering what was there before, the serious lack of room for the deck sculper drains, and the lack of options for same, I was ok with it. However, James managed to change the elbow and thru-hulls so now the thru-hull is below the elbow.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
08-22-2008, 03:58 PM
Ah, being used to Blakes seacocks, which form the through-hull, I had to do a double take, but I agree with the modification.

redbopeep
09-05-2008, 07:51 PM
http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m193/searover1916/exhausthose.jpg

After seeing this, we purchased it for the raw water to the genset (1") and to the engine (1.25"). We'll be using the extra from a 50' roll of the 1" to do some of the bilge pumps, but still haven't purchased the 1.5" for the cockpit drains. This stuff is greatly flexible. I like overkill. So, we'll be getting this for the cockpit drains too. :)

Jim Ledger
09-05-2008, 08:12 PM
Dish soap.

JimConlin
09-05-2008, 09:16 PM
Ditto for Shieldsflex.
I once pit a pot of boiling water down the galley sink and it had an undesired effect on a vinyl hose.

Scott Rosen
09-06-2008, 12:35 AM
I use Shieldsflex and keep the seacocks open.