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Dale R. Hamilton
08-05-2008, 12:02 PM
This is my last work day- retire tomorrow. I'll leave this government issued green steel desk, burried in a windowless basement office in the bowels of an enormous hospital, where I have drudged away in meaningless insignficance for 23 years. And in all that time I have never changed anything- never accomplished anything of significance- just maintained the steady flow of paper that nobody reads. Of all the windmills I've clashed with, all the heads butted and the blind alleys I followed, I've never managed to right one wrong. Never successfully introduced even a single better way to do something- although I've tried and tried.

So its with great relish that I'll enter my boat shop and begin to accomplish something of meaning, that I can stand back at the end of the day and appreciate my accomplishment. And maybe even someday somebody will show up and buy what I've built and co confirm my accomplishment with $ and cents.

Well, not that thats off my chest, I'll start emptying this desk.

Dale

Milo Christensen
08-05-2008, 12:08 PM
That was a hard thing to say about your work life. Honest, but hard.

I hope your retirement will be as fulfilling as your job was boring.

Good Luck!

Joe Dupere
08-05-2008, 12:11 PM
I had a job like that for 20 years. But at least at the end of each year I could stand back and say, "There's another fifteen hundred students who will graduate with a student loan debt of $20,000."

At least you did no harm. I have nightmares about the debt slavery I subjected all those students to. Of course, I was only one cog in a big machine, the policies weren't mine, and it didn't seem to bother anybody but me. But the end result of my 20 years in financial aid is probably around 30,000 students with a combined student loan debt of over $500,000,000.

Good for you for moving on to something that gives you satisfaction. We're about 3 weeks from starting the first phase of constructing our own house. I spent all last summer cutting the wood for it, and man was it satisfying!! I can't wait to start on the next stage.

Joe, FPoP

Thom T
08-05-2008, 12:17 PM
Former GS13 quit the DOD one day and never looked back. I sure could put a Federal retirement check to good use about now though. Your life probably touched a lot more people than you think. If not take some credit for not destroying anything.

Kaa
08-05-2008, 12:20 PM
Should have run sooner.

Kaa

Dale R. Hamilton
08-05-2008, 12:29 PM
Yes, I guess I'd do it again. Because it provided a good income, great health insurance/benefits, good retirement, job security, and people called me doctor. But- my life had another dimension. Retired Army- and there were some accomplishments that I'm very proud of.

So, my daytime job may have been a drudge, but its way better than being out of work- and a few of our forumites are reporting. I don't mean to be so negative- but I've always been very straight forward with you guys- and I've always said what I felt.

botebum
08-05-2008, 12:37 PM
Some of the toughest jobs are those that are thankless and make the person feel useless yet cannot be done without. Congratulations on sticking with it for so long. Enjoy the hell out of your retirement!

Doug

John of Phoenix
08-05-2008, 12:39 PM
It beats getting shot at.
Enjoy that retirement check. You earned it.

TimH
08-05-2008, 01:17 PM
Reminds me of "Joe v/s the Volcano" :)

George Roberts
08-05-2008, 01:18 PM
"But the end result of my 20 years in financial aid is probably around 30,000 students with a combined student loan debt of over $500,000,000."

Strange way people look at money.

Most of those 30,000 students paid off their loans. Most earned enough to make the debt a good investment. The interest paid helped those with "safe" investments.

Joe (SoCal)
08-05-2008, 01:20 PM
"But the end result of my 20 years in financial aid is probably around 30,000 students with a combined student loan debt of over $500,000,000."

Strange way people look at money.

Most of those 30,000 students paid off their loans. Most earned enough to make the debt a good investment. The interest paid helped those with "safe" investments.

Ya get your bail money back ? I find that a strange way to invest your money :p

Dale good luck, If you ever need a recommendation I would vouch fer ya ;)

Peter Malcolm Jardine
08-05-2008, 01:22 PM
So, my daytime job may have been a drudge, but its way better than being out of work- and a few of our forumites are reporting. I don't mean to be so negative- but I've always been very straight forward with you guys- and I've always said what I felt.

Dale, sometimes it's hard to see what you've accomplished when you are a cog in the wheel, but I would think you're being a mite hard on yourself..:D.... but that said, I too look forward to the day I can fuss around on projects I love, which is one of the reasons I work for myself building stuff rather than retail selling or politics or or or..:rolleyes:..

Good luck in your retirement. No matter how drudgy it felt at the end, it's still an adjustment... take some time to take stock, and smell the roses etc.

paladin
08-05-2008, 02:16 PM
Dale...there was a time and place when I thought I was doing great things, then in the end I was just a flunky for folks that didn't want to get their hands dirty. The only way I could justify anything was to go sailing and raise a kid or two.....
Best of luck feller....

Tylerdurden
08-05-2008, 03:30 PM
Congrats... Enjoy your time.

Michael s/v Sannyasin
08-05-2008, 03:42 PM
Don't underestimate the accomplishment in keeping things running on a more or less steady course for 23 years. Defensive line men may not have the most glamorous job but the QB wouldn't survive without them.

Enjoy yourself, but stay busy.

Thom T
08-05-2008, 04:17 PM
Today I learned that a good friend of mine is dying after a long struggle with Parkinsons. He was a ten point Vietnam vet,and a former Navy Seal. During his lifetime he rode with the Hells Angels in San Francisco, drove a Fuel Altered drag car in Bakersfield, sailed half way around the world in a homemade boat. He also created some of the most beautiful wooden art work I ever seen. He dies penniless mostly because he gave away far more of his work than he ever sold.He leaves a very modest home/ wood shop and his tools. I only ever known him by the name Bisch. I feel lucky to have known him and will cherise the wooden clocks, ships wheels, and sculpture he made for me. The reason I attach this to this thread is that Bisch could have never sat at that metal desk, but I can't help but think of what would have happened to my friend if there had not been people sitting in the basements of hospitals on his behalf. Thank you sir for your service

skuthorp
08-05-2008, 05:40 PM
Congratulations Dale, but don't leave the job bitter. I've had a career in the print industry mostly. First job as an apprentice hand setting a sporting fixture in 6pt type. I have always half joked that my job was producing waste paper, and it's true. I had one article I produced in all that time I kept a sample of. The process has always been interesting, the product rubbish. OTOH I became interested in conservation bookbinding and that has it's rewards.
But I have seldom described myself in terms of my work, and I bet you didn't either. And you haven't retired you know, just taken up a different career, with enthusiasm it seems!

Thorne
08-05-2008, 05:47 PM
At least you get to retire -- could be worse!

http://www.woodenboat.com/forum/showthread.php?t=83311

The Bigfella
08-05-2008, 07:21 PM
Best wishes Dale. Enjoy the retirement.

Hwyl
08-05-2008, 07:36 PM
Do you have any travel plans Dale. I also think you are underestimating your achievements.

You could visit your namesake places, start with Dale Pembrokeshire

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dale%2C_Pembrokeshire

Paul Fitzgerald
08-05-2008, 08:20 PM
Dale, I wouldn't be so hard on yourself.
All large organisations, especially ones as complex as a hospital, tend towards disarray.

Just maintaining a steady state is an achievement.

Speaking as an agent of change in the health system here in Oz, its not all that flash.
Even if you manage to achieve change the degree of resistance increases so you have to keep moving on.

Now twenty years later a government goes into an election with the very policies I fought to establish and maintain, but were destroyed by the forces of darkness, including people who are now ministers in the same government!

But its twenty years too late, the system is stuffed.

Just surviving is a major achievement, I eventually walked away just to stay sane.

Lew Barrett
08-05-2008, 09:11 PM
I think many of us feel we have worked for money and not much else in the end. I bet your family is grateful to you for your dedication and consistency. As has been said here, it's usually not for us to really know what our effect on others has been. You might be surprised. I think the notion of a meaningful second career is probably the most powerful positive aspiration of Boomers today.

What do they say? Today is the first day of the rest of your life. Have a great time. I'm right behind you.

PaulC
08-05-2008, 09:19 PM
You need to leave a picture of your boat on your office wall!

PaulC
08-05-2008, 09:20 PM
... and congratulations on your retirement! May it be as grand as I hope mine is!http://www.woodenboat.com/forum/images/icons/icon10.gif

jimmy lee
08-06-2008, 12:00 AM
Dale, may your retirement be everything you want it to be!

Paul Girouard
08-06-2008, 12:46 AM
Ya get your bail money back ? I find that a strange way to invest your money :p



Good one Joe,

http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/dirtbox/pics/muttley.gif

GR should just STFU!

Dale I was thinkin you where the head maintenance guy , yet you say you where called Doctor? Engineer maybe?

Enjoy your retirement, build stuff, stuff that will last a long while, mark it with your name or a branding iron, you earned it.

jack grebe
08-06-2008, 06:42 AM
HAPPY RETIREMENT DALE


Now get busy:D.

Dale R. Hamilton
08-07-2008, 10:49 AM
Well thanks for the cheer guys- that perks me up considerably. If any of you find yourself on Interstates 24 or 40 passing thru the Nashville Tennessee area, call me at 615-890-9227- would love to show you the shop, current/past builds, and of course share an adult beverage. Bring your checkbook- You might see something you like.

Milo Christensen
08-07-2008, 11:22 AM
He's retired, he builds boats, but he doesn't take American Express.