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View Full Version : Stupid Is As Stupid Does.



Milo Christensen
08-04-2008, 07:31 AM
As the old adage goes, “If you took everything away from those that have, and gave to those that have not, within 5 years the haves would have it all back again.”

Extreme Makeover House in Foreclosure. (http://blogs.wsj.com/developments/2008/07/31/extreme-makeover-home-in-foreclosure/?mod=fpa_blogs)

I'm opposed to shows like Extreme Makeover. Why not leave out the drama and the ridiculous deadlines and work with Habitat for Humanity to build 5 or 6 homes for the price of the one in the article.

Mrleft8
08-04-2008, 07:41 AM
I agree Milo.

Duncan Gibbs
08-04-2008, 07:59 AM
I'll third that motion!

Osborne Russell
08-04-2008, 08:01 AM
You guys are trying to sabotage the trickle-down.

Phillip Allen
08-04-2008, 08:12 AM
Oh stop it...a lot of construction business have taken a hard hit

I've seen it all my life. At the first sign of trouble in the economy, the first order of business is to run out and beat up the bricklayer

G.Sherman
08-04-2008, 08:14 AM
I'm sixty and for all that time have NEVER seen that elusive "trickle-down", my experience suggests the reverse..... lots of "trickle-up" especially if you're connected to the latest corrupt administration.

Regarding the makeover, I guess these people just substituted their old **** for some self-inflicted new ****.

Hooray for Reality Shows..... whose reality?

botebum
08-04-2008, 08:23 AM
Before I got laid off I had just finished building 9 low income homes built with state and Fed. grants for people who's homes had been damaged or had fallen into the condemnation stage because of disabilities or other mitigating factors. The homes were small 3 BR, 2Ba. modest homes. One of the stipulations was that the homes could not be sold or mortgaged for 5 years or the value of the home would be deducted from the selling price and go to the county to continue the program. The seller would only recieve the land value. Why couldn't they do this with these homes? What's the need/sense of building glamorous homes in a mid-level neighborhood. Simple construction loan criteria would not allow building a $500k house in a $200k neighborhood.

Doug

bamamick
08-04-2008, 08:24 AM
My question about any of these shows is: if the folks couldn't maintain what they had before how will they do it now? Who'll pay the power bill? Who will maintain the landscaping?

I have never seen 'Extreme Makeover' and I have helped on Habitat builds, but I have always wondered about that stuff. I know that some of this stuff is staged, but half the time you see people on 'Desperate Landscapes' and they don't even own a lawn mower. Who doesn't own a lawnmower?

The best one of all is the HGTV Dream House. My wife and I enter this every year. If we were to win our plan had always been to visit the house once as a vacation, and then sell that sucker along with the car and anything else they give you, pay the taxes, and then use the money as we want to traveling or whatever. A couple of years ago this family decided that they actually wanted to LIVE IN THE HOUSE! How silly can you get? They spent the cash award in very short order just paying the power bill. When asked about it the producers of the show said something along the order of 'well, we never dreamt that anyone would actually try and live in the house'. Funny stuff, eh? Dream homes are only good as dreams. Hardly any of us can afford the reality of even paying for utilities or insurance, or maintenance or whatever.

Mickey Lake

The Bigfella
08-04-2008, 08:30 AM
A guy two doors from me had a backyard renovation done by one of the popular local shows - maybe five years back. It still looks great - and he maintains and uses it.

He was their "Fathers Day" special. His wife bolted and left him with four young kids to raise. He struck a bit of tragedy on the way - with one killed by an idiot in a road accident - and a few years later when the kids were raised and he'd met a new woman - she was killed in a road accident.

I can't think of a better example of the good that some of those shows can do.

Aed
08-04-2008, 09:53 AM
From the original WSJ article:


The Harper family of Lake City, Ga., used the new home as collateral for a $450,000 loan to finance its own construction business, a venture that ultimately failed.

I'm all in favor of pointing out the flaws in the concept behind Extreme Home Makeover, but it sounds to me like the Harper family took a gamble with their windfall and lost.

Maybe the Harper family needed to invest in their business to maintain the home, but (again from the article):


... the Harpers didn’t just get a fancy new house after the show. Beazer Homes raised $250,000 as contributions for the family to use as scholarships for the three children and for a home maintenance fund.

Beazer Homes, according to the article, is the Atlanta-based home builder that built the house for the Harpers.

Look, it blows that the Harpers lost their house, but how is it in this case the fault of the TV show?

Osborne Russell
08-04-2008, 10:22 AM
It's very European. An aristocrat flings a handful of coins from the window of his carriage to watch the rabble scramble for them.

Thom T
08-04-2008, 12:00 PM
We say look at what the minorities have done with the stimulus, bought big screen TV's and downloaded porn.

We say look how that trailer park trash pissed away their lottery winnings on breast implants and expensive cars.

We say look how that illegal drinks away his salary on Friday night.

I was once told that in an economic downturn, the trouble for rich people is that they never learned to live poor. So maybe poor people were never taught to live rich

Kaa
08-04-2008, 12:13 PM
Seems to me y'all are just trying to make things complicated when this is just an illustration of an old wisdom: "A fool and his money are soon parted".

Kaa

Osborne Russell
08-04-2008, 12:16 PM
So maybe poor people were never taught to live rich

They got the textbook but the dog ate their homework.

Milo Christensen
08-04-2008, 12:41 PM
. . . I was once told that in an economic downturn, the trouble for rich people is that they never learned to live poor. So maybe poor people were never taught to live rich

I was once told, when suffering a personal economic downturn; "Milo, quit your bitchin' you ain't poor, you're just broke. Broke is a temporary condition, poor is a way of life."

George Roberts
08-04-2008, 01:11 PM
“If you took everything away from those that have, and gave to those that have not, within 5 years the haves would have it all back again.”

While I agree with that, that does not appear to be the problem in this case.

The family made a business decision that turned out poorly. That happens to a lot of people. (I suspect the wise would not mortgage their house that deeply, but sometimes we all do things that turn out to not be wise.)

Phillip Allen
08-04-2008, 02:55 PM
They stand to make money when the book comes out...(ghost written of course)

shamus
08-04-2008, 04:38 PM
As quite a young child in church, I used to have problems with the logic of the scripture which ran something like "To those that have, shall be given; to those that have not, even what they have shall be taken away." It seemed to have an internal inconsistency, but I've since discovered that whoever coined that one knew a thing or two.

botebum
08-04-2008, 07:20 PM
... but sometimes we all do things that turn out to not be wise.The absolute no-****ter of your life GR. Do I sense a grain of remorse or only cus you got caught?
Sorry Scot- I can't ignore every damn thing.

Doug