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lagspiller
07-13-2008, 03:50 PM
I just got back from a trip up to Lofoten and thought I would share some pictures that should be of interest on this website.

The Lofotr museum is a new viking museum built as a 'living replica' of the very recent archeological finds. They have made full scale copies of the Viking settlement that was in use for hundreds of years before being abandoned in year 500. It is a 'hands on' museum where you are expected to touch or use everything.

http://www.22kvm.net/bilder/Lofoten08/album/slides/100_3011.jpg
The longhouse is about 60 meters long and 9 meters high and was home to about 70 people. Inside at the far end are living quarters, workshops and the kitchen. The middle is a huge guild hall and the near end is storage and stables. They found artifacts showing that the people who lived here (before 500 AD) were already trading goods as far away as Istanbul.

We spent a good hour looking, lifting and trying copies of things in the longhouse, but the most interesting part of the museum for me was at the sea inlet. They found sites that showed a lot of boat activity and both a winter and summer harbour. So they had copies of the boats made and use them.

http://www.22kvm.net/bilder/Lofoten08/album/slides/100_2994.jpg
Like this færing.

But the big thrill was ...
http://www.22kvm.net/bilder/Lofoten08/album/slides/100_2990.jpg
The full scale model of the Gokstad ship.
About 60 ft loa and 18 tons before the ballast and crew are counted.

I've visited the real one in Oslo many times, but there you are kept at arm-lengths reach and can only imagine how the ship would look on the water, much less climb aboard.
http://www.22kvm.net/bilder/Lofoten08/album/slides/100_2995.jpg
In Viking times 70 men rowed the double-banked oars. On our trip something like 40 norwegian, italian, czech, german, lithuanian.... tourists tried to make some headway. It was VERY obvious not many had touched an oar before, but we did get it moving.

http://www.22kvm.net/bilder/Lofoten08/album/slides/100_3008.jpg

The 'chieftan' told me later that the ship was actually sailed at 23 knots a few years ago in a storm by 16 trained guys. But not trained enough, because they sank the ship in about 30 meters of water.
http://www.22kvm.net/bilder/Lofoten08/album/slides/100_3002.jpg
It was found on the bottom, upright with the pennant still flying at the top of the 18 meter mast.

lagspiller
07-13-2008, 03:52 PM
Part two of the post (I could only use 6 images at a time)


http://www.22kvm.net/bilder/Lofoten08/album/slides/100_3000.jpg

Here is a final shot of how it might have looked to someone running down to the viking harbor 1700 years ago (pretend you don't see the pier...)
http://www.22kvm.net/bilder/Lofoten08/album/slides/100_3010.jpg

After all this old Viking stuff, I'll give you something modern to ease you back to your present time...
http://www.22kvm.net/bilder/Lofoten08/album/slides/100_2911.jpg
The Lofoten Folkehøgskule fembøringen
http://www.22kvm.net/bilder/Lofoten08/album/slides/100_2912.jpg

...and a beautiful Nordlands færing
http://www.22kvm.net/bilder/Lofoten08/album/slides/100_2992.jpg

Kasey
07-13-2008, 04:23 PM
Those are beautiful shots, and you tell the tale in a fascinating way!

Thank you for the details and the insight, as well as the pride. You're a wonderful storyteller.

J. Dillon
07-13-2008, 07:24 PM
And a nice set of images s well. I wish I had access to them when I was building my long boat model.

Thanks for posting them.:D

JD

Jim Ledger
07-13-2008, 07:42 PM
Yes, thanks for posting those. I'd love to go there.

Paul Pless
07-13-2008, 07:54 PM
The 'chieftan' told me later that the ship was actually sailed at 23 knots a few years ago in a storm by 16 trained guys.
23 knots!!! betcha there was some frayed nerves during that escapade!!!

Thanks for the pictures, fascinating!

paladin
07-13-2008, 07:58 PM
Those rigging levers are really neat.......I saw them on old drawings in the museum in Reykjavik....

Michael Beckman
07-13-2008, 08:15 PM
And people try and tell me that oiled finishs don't look good..

Excellent post. I really need to get over to scandinavia soon and spend a few months(years?) seeing all the local boats..

StevenBauer
07-13-2008, 08:16 PM
Thanks for the great post, Lagspiller.


For those interested in these boats check out this site: http://www.seastallion.ie/

These guys are sailing a replica of Skuldelev 2 from Dublin to Denmark and WoodenBoat's Tom Jackson is one of her crew.

http://www.seastallion.ie/images/boat2.jpg


http://www.seastallion.ie/images/Havhingst_soesaetning_07.jpg

Thousands of well wishers saw off the replica Viking longship The Sea Stallion of Glendalough from Dublin Port today as it began its return voyage to Roskilde in Denmark.
The Sea Stallion is a reconstruction of a ship, the Skuldelev 2 , built in Dublin in 1042 and believed to have sunk in Roskilde Fjord, near Copenhagen, some 30 years later. The remains of this ship, as well as four others, were excavated in the 1960s.
The reconstruction was carried out over four years at the boatyard attached to the Roskilde Viking Ship Museum.
The farewell ceremony was attended by the Lord Mayor and Admiral of the Port, Councillor Paddy Bourke; Dr Martin Mansergh, Minister of State with responsibility for the Office of Public Works and the Arts; Dr Pat Wallace, Director of the National Museum of Ireland and Tinna Damgard-Sorenseon, director of the Viking Ship Museum in Roskilde.
After farewell messages from the dignitaries present, cheers from the crowd and a traditional piper, the 65-strong crew embarked the ship in preparation for their return journey.
“Ireland has a rich Viking heritage and the arrival of the Sea Stallion to Ireland has regenerated interest in this heritage. This magnificent ship symbolizes the shared history of Ireland and Denmark and will continue to link in friendship and community, both our peoples and countries now and into the future,” said Dr Mansergh.
“I wish the crew of the Sea Stallion every good fortune on their continuing journey.”
The return journey is planned via the southern English coastline, and the vessel is due to berth in Portsmouth in a fortnight’s time for the weekend of July 11th to 13th.
The crew – some volunteering for the first time – are “fit and well”, and the mast was set in Dublin Port yesterday. The vessel is due to be packed with food, lifejackets and survival suits today and will be accompanied on the 1,400 nautical-mile journey by a supply ship.
It is more than 1,200 years since Viking raiders landed in Ireland . They came exclusively from Norway, and the first recorded raid was in 795 on Rathlin Island, off the Antrim coast, where the local church was burned.
© 2008 ireland.com

StevenBauer
07-13-2008, 08:37 PM
Actually, this is the site, with videos and everything:
www.havhingsten.dk



Steven

C. Ross
07-13-2008, 08:40 PM
That captain looks like he could get a crew of green tourists to row.

I've been curious how they step the masts in those shallow-draft longboats. Nice view in the second picture, Steven. Looks similar to arrangement in the Lofotr boat. Does it work as a tabernacle?

Woxbox
07-13-2008, 08:48 PM
Lagspiller --- Great post. I'll take replicas that can be used over "don't touch" museum pieces any day of the week.

lagspiller
07-14-2008, 03:35 AM
I think having seen the originals (they are really amazing) and then being able to actually try something that is a true re-creation of the original in a real setting as archeologically correct as possible is hard to beat.

But I was surprised at how powerful even the slight difference of aspect between appreciating the boat from land is in comparison to what hits you when you stand on the deck and look aft... that experience was so much stronger. I got that 'jaw-dropping' shock that is almost physical. It really gives a different understanding of how huge and extreme the boat is. That one experience alone was worth driving 4000 km...

Dave R
07-14-2008, 11:49 AM
Thank you for these photos. I remember going by the longhouse when we were in Lofoten during a shore excursion from the Coastal Steamer. That was in 2000. I would have liked it if we could have stopped but we didn't.

Captain Blight
07-14-2008, 01:22 PM
Thank you for these photos. I remember going by the longhouse when we were in Lofoten during a shore excursion from the Coastal Steamer. That was in 2000. I would have liked it if we could have stopped but we didn't.<y mom did that cruise (on Hurtegrute) in '01. She had a great time.
Her side of the family comes from that part of the world, on Ulvangsoye. My cousin Vegard (http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9F0CE0DB1F3FF930A25751C1A9659582 60) has gone all citified and lives in Kirkenes, though.

lagspiller
07-14-2008, 01:30 PM
They still bus people in from the coastal steamer (it lands in Svolvær - near where I was staying). It has probably changed a lot since you were there... 2000 is nearly half the entire lifespan of the place ago. Now they always use some hours in the museum.

lagspiller
07-14-2008, 01:34 PM
My cousin Vegard (http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9F0CE0DB1F3FF930A25751C1A9659582 60) has gone all citified and lives in Kirkenes, though.
Vegard Ulvang is your cousin!
Respect.

Dave R
07-14-2008, 02:04 PM
They still bus people in from the coastal steamer (it lands in Svolvær - near where I was staying). It has probably changed a lot since you were there... 2000 is nearly half the entire lifespan of the place ago. Now they always use some hours in the museum.

I suppose you are right. We got off in Svolvær and boarded the bus to end up at an art gallery in Henningsvær before meeting the ship again in Stamsund. The gallery was interesting but I would have rather seen the stuff you just saw. Of course much of it probably wasn't there then.

Captain Blight
07-14-2008, 02:08 PM
Vegard Ulvang is your cousin!
Respect.Well, I had nothing to do with it. My mom's met him, says he's a really really nice guy. I wonder if he has any pull at the museum? I wonder if they could use a Yank around for help some summer?

lagspiller
07-14-2008, 04:16 PM
Iend up at an art gallery in Henningsvær before meeting the ship again
The Harr gallery. I spent a couple of hours there too. I thought it was excellent. That man knows the sea, too.


Blight, everybody here knows he is a really nice guy. Relaxed and low key. If he goes good for you, your future is assured.
The guide that showed us around was a Pole (yeah, we were a bit surprised, but we had joined the english tour because that fit our schedule and the guy was good) so there's no reason why a yank wouldn't be welcome. As long as you know what you are talking about. :D

Captain Blight
07-14-2008, 06:07 PM
As long as you know what you are talking about. :D
Oh. Well, that may be a problem....

WCM
07-15-2008, 12:49 AM
Thanks for creating this thread. It is very interesting and the photographs are excellent.

martin schulz
07-15-2008, 06:25 AM
Thanks for creating this thread. It is very interesting and the photographs are excellent.

Second that!

Very nice. So far I haven't expanded my boating-interest in the field of longboats (apart from being amused about the viking/slav boat replicas that show up at the rumregatta).
But when people talk about them I am a keen listener...

Here is a litle contribution from me (rumregatta 2004):

http://i264.photobucket.com/albums/ii188/sionnachan/rumregatta/eb04d7d2.jpg

http://i264.photobucket.com/albums/ii188/sionnachan/rumregatta/930d75c1.jpg
in the beginning they were doing fine

http://i264.photobucket.com/albums/ii188/sionnachan/rumregatta/3c6d8262.jpg
At the end they took down the sail and, instead of staying in the regatta, they rowed to the nearby Danish Ox-island entered the pub on the island and drank all available alcohol (must be an action inspired by the kind of boat they were sailing) ;)

Woxbox
07-15-2008, 08:30 AM
I just caught up with those video clips. http://www.havhingsten.dk/index.php?id=1144&L=1
Here's a sample -- something you'll never see with the museum artifacts. The shots of the boat sailing through some heavy seas are amazing.

The captain says in the roughest weather they encountered, which he didn't call a true storm, they were bailing constantly and using several pumps at once. This is something I'd always wondered about. How did they manage these ships in extreme weather back the Viking days. Did they rely on buckets to put toss the water back where it belongs?