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knots
06-20-2008, 10:00 PM
http://sacramento.craigslist.org/boa/726299692.html

norm

tchiffriller
06-20-2008, 10:12 PM
anyone interested?

botebum
06-20-2008, 10:30 PM
They showed up at different times to take the pictures of her going down but made no attempt to save her? Sounds a little odd to me.

Doug

Bob Smalser
06-20-2008, 10:36 PM
Contrary to the ad, somehow I don't think bilge pump failure is her major problem.

Lew Barrett
06-20-2008, 10:41 PM
I also think the number of survivors is now 28.

boylesboats
06-21-2008, 12:25 AM
About how many foam blocks will it take to raise her?
Blocks is 8"x 8"x 16"

DLC
06-21-2008, 12:39 AM
each block will lift 37 pounds in salt water
35 pounds in fresh water
minus the weight of the block
dlc

boylesboats
06-21-2008, 12:42 AM
each block will lift 37 pounds in salt water
35 pounds in fresh water
minus the weight of the block
dlc

Hummmmm, cramming hundred blocks in there would be a tough but fun and rewarding job

Captain Blight
06-21-2008, 12:58 AM
Hummmmm, cramming hundred blocks in there would be a tough but fun and rewarding jobAnd would likely rip the deck right off her.

Put a few in and get a couple pumps started so that you could get a couple divers down to pump water beneath her to break the suction that's likely holding her down. If you could get her so she's just barly awash, you might be able to tow her to where a Travellift could pluck her out.

But I'd want to see the most recent survey before I tackled anything like a project on that scale. They're enough work when they're half that size and never been sunk.

boylesboats
06-21-2008, 01:01 AM
And would likely rip the deck right off her.

Put a few in and get a couple pumps started so that you could get a couple divers down to pump water beneath her to break the suction that's likely holding her down. If you could get her so she's just barly awash, you might be able to tow her to where a Travellift could pluck her out.

But I'd want to see the most recent survey before I tackled anything like a project on that scale. They're enough work when they're half that size and never been sunk.

you're right about that... must be gentle and slow liftin' her... it probably take a week or so to lift her enough for tow

Saltiguy
06-21-2008, 08:40 AM
Truck-sized inner tubes and a compressor - that's the way to do it. It's very easy when you're at a dock like that.

paladin
06-21-2008, 08:49 AM
Truck sized inner tubes will tear the decks off.....dunno ask how I know....weren't me...but I told the idjits so before they started raising her...I raised a boat like that in over 100 feet of water......took over a week to just get the decks awash, then the pumping started.....

Gary E
06-21-2008, 10:13 AM
And IF you get it up... THEN WHAT????

spend $20,000 maybe $40,000 fixing it???

OKaaaa... step right up, I wana see that fool

BDysart
06-21-2008, 10:43 AM
There's just no way this could be worth anyone's time or money. I'm in the middle of repairing a 42 foot Chris that has never been sunk and I'm not sure it's worth it. I'll bet it's going to be a huge bill for someone just to scrap it.

Thermo
06-21-2008, 11:46 AM
Here's another one if'n you're wanting a similar bargain and are on the East side.

http://fortmyers.craigslist.org/boa/695899569.html

Lew Barrett
06-21-2008, 12:02 PM
Twenty thousand dollars is just the beginning of the costs to raise and stabilize it, never mind restoration costs.

BDysart
06-21-2008, 02:25 PM
The ad doesn't talk about power but I'm guessing gas. If it had a couple of decent diesels it might be worth it. There's a guy here who has had pretty good success getting diesels going again that have been submerged. Last winter a 50 footer went down here in a storm and he was able to get that one going after being sumberged for almost a month. Though, of course there's no telling how long the engine will last after that sort of abuse, of course.

Captain Blight
06-21-2008, 02:36 PM
Here's another one if'n you're wanting a similar bargain and are on the East side.

http://fortmyers.craigslist.org/boa/695899569.html
That one might be worth it, if I still lived in Floridia I'd be all over that.

Tylerdurden
06-21-2008, 04:11 PM
Next to the dock is crane territory. I can imagine what the barge costs would be. Anyone know what the standard procedure is in hurricane territory for sunk pleasure craft?

Saltiguy
06-21-2008, 05:16 PM
The inner-tube method works great. You attach as many as possible to the outside of the hull, start pumping air and you get a controlled lift. Some tubes go inside as well. Working at the dock you have handy electric, a purchase point for lines aplenty and a good position for some serious water pumps. One day job for 2 good men.

Tylerdurden
06-21-2008, 05:32 PM
I have a couple of truck inner tubes and thought I should keep them aboard "in case" I will have to figure the lift in one but I would assume its close to a 55 gallon drum in volume.
Make one weird arsed life raft :D

Banjo
06-21-2008, 05:53 PM
Is this the same sorta boat that is the subject of this thread?

http://www.woodenboatsnj.com/images/42ftMathews.jpg
http://www.woodenboatsnj.com/images/42ftMathews2.jpg

Location of pics above: http://www.woodenboatsnj.com/40to50ft.html

Lovely boat, it's almost a crime to allow such boats to degrade into oblivion IMHO.

Captain Blight
06-21-2008, 06:48 PM
I have a couple of truck inner tubes and thought I should keep them aboard "in case" I will have to figure the lift in one but I would assume its close to a 55 gallon drum in volume.
Make one weird arsed life raft :DGood thing to have aboard in any event, I keep several on the towboat I work on. In the event of an allision or collision that starts a barge to leaking past the point where cedar shingles won't take care of it, I've stuffed an inner tube in the crack and put some air in it. No reason it wouldn't work on sprung planks or something like that.