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switters
06-19-2008, 01:19 PM
I need to build some patio furniture, two chairs and a table. this will be uncovered and definitely not fancy. I just want something that goes together fast with material from the local orange box store. The chairs and table will be outside the garage door, a moaning chair location since I don't have room in the garage to sit and build the next boat. I'm spending this lunch hour designing, but any suggestions or plans would be great.

Again, nothing too fancy, the longer I spend on furniture the longer it will be untill the boat gets started. Arms on the chair is a must.

Kaa
06-19-2008, 01:23 PM
Adirondack chairs are pretty simple to make

http://toolmonger.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/06/adirondack-chair.jpg

And a table is what? four legs, a tabletop, and some corner bracing..?

Kaa

switters
06-19-2008, 01:27 PM
I love this place, that is exactly what I was hoping for.

Many thanks, I think I can handle the table design, just need a flat spot large enough for a few beers and bowl of chips.

Canoez
06-19-2008, 01:28 PM
I need to build some patio furniture, two chairs and a table. this will be uncovered and definitely not fancy. I just want something that goes together fast with material from the local orange box store. The chairs and table will be outside the garage door, a moaning chair location since I don't have room in the garage to sit and build the next boat. I'm spending this lunch hour designing, but any suggestions or plans would be great.

Again, nothing too fancy, the longer I spend on furniture the longer it will be untill the boat gets started. Arms on the chair is a must.

Adirondack chairs. Definitely. Plans are widely available and they're a relatively easy build. They don't have to be complex and they make an awfully comfy 'moaning chair'. (DAMHIKT) Also, if you're pressed for time, you can just put on a really wide arm and skip the table.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2163/2198613814_29a2e30df0.jpg

Kaa, you're too darn quick on the draw...

Captain Blight
06-19-2008, 01:31 PM
I like the paint job.

switters
06-19-2008, 02:11 PM
I hate to bump this up over the end of the world threads but if anyone is interested i found the take-off tables for the project Kaa kindly posted for me.

MATERIALS LIST--ADIRONDACK CHAIR Key No. Size and description (use)
A 2 1-1/16 x 5 x 33-7/8-in. white cedar (rear leg)
B 1 1-1/16 x 5-3/8 x 23-5/8-in. white cedar (rail)
C 1 1-1/16 x 4-1/4 x 23-5/8-in. white cedar (stretcher)
D 2 1-1/16 x 4-1/4 x 20-7/16-in. white cedar (front leg)
E 2 1-1/16 x 2-1/2 x 6-in. white cedar (bracket)
F 2 1-1/16 x 5-1/2 x 28-1/2-in. white cedar (arm)
G 1 1-1/16 x 2-1/2 x 27-in. white cedar (stretcher)
H 5 1-1/16 x 4 x 32-1/2-in. white cedar (slat)
I 1 1-1/16 x 1-1/2 x 18-in. white cedar (support)
J 5 1-1/16 x 3-3/8 x 23-5/8-in. white cedar (hinge block)
K 1-1/2-in. No. 10 galvanized fh screw
L 2-in. No. 10 galvanized fh screw
M 2-1/2-in. No. 10 galvanized fh screw
N 1/2-in.-dia. wood plug
Misc.: Polyurethane glue, primer and paint.

Canoez
06-19-2008, 02:17 PM
I like the paint job.

Oh, you mean the naturally applied white finish? :rolleyes:

switters
06-19-2008, 02:23 PM
I don't think I've ever seen white cedar in the 'orange box' store... you might have to go to a more specialized supplier for a decent wood.


pine and paint it is,

Canoez
06-19-2008, 02:24 PM
pine and paint it is,

Seal it with shellac before painting or they'll bleed pitch like a stuck pig when you put them in the sun. Again, DAMHIKT

Jim Ledger
06-19-2008, 02:39 PM
I made a set of Adirondack chairs out of Red Cedar, rough sawn, mostly nailed together with galv. finish nails with 1/4" bolts for the critical joints. They lasted 18 years, outside all the time. Their replacements are bronze screw fastened Ipe which will last a bit longer, but when you mow the lawn, it takes two people to move one.:rolleyes:

The design is strikingly similar to the one in the picture posted by Canoez, and I can recommend them for comfort. The curved back and seat are well worth the extra effort.

switters
06-19-2008, 02:57 PM
Well I was going to the store tonight but now you have all given me something to think about. I was going to half-arse it because i don't plan on having them forever, but I said that about the coffee table I threw together one night about 20 years ago and haven't replaced yet. I think I'll build a work bench tonight to organize tools and see what is available here for better wood.

Canoez
06-19-2008, 02:58 PM
You'll be much happier with better wood.

Keith Wilson
06-19-2008, 04:02 PM
Red cedar is fine for basic outdoor furniture, and Home Despot carries lots of it - around here, anyway. I have some adirondack chairs I threw together eight years ago; deck screws and cedar, no finish, and it sits outside all year round. They're still holding up fine. I'd recommend sealing the end of the legs that sit on the ground with a little epoxy.

switters
06-19-2008, 04:19 PM
did you use fence slats or the good stuff?

cause the fence slats are a bit thin according to the plans but.....

unrelated but yea, after building one tiny boat I now see the solution to most problems around the house is epoxy. I was actually thinking of epoxy and varnish on the whole thing but I don't want to keep "treating" it periodically for years.

I've got a gallon of west systems in the garage and I'm not afraid to use it.

Songololo
06-19-2008, 04:20 PM
Canoez, where did you find the plans for your chairs? I like the look of the curved back and seat. Most online plans that I have come across so far look similar to the plans that Kaa posted.

Lance

Jim Ledger
06-19-2008, 04:57 PM
did you use fence slats or the good stuff?

cause the fence slats are a bit thin according to the plans but.....

unrelated but yea, after building one tiny boat I now see the solution to most problems around the house is epoxy. I was actually thinking of epoxy and varnish on the whole thing but I don't want to keep "treating" it periodically for years.

I've got a gallon of west systems in the garage and I'm not afraid to use it.

Don't use the epoxy except to seal the end grain of the legs. Red Cedar will go gray and be Ok for years. Stain them if you want with some deck stain, but don't use epoxy. The sunlight will degrade it.

Using pre-drilled finish nails, hot dip galvanized, will allow you to fasten thinner parts together than deck screws would. You don't need a high grade of cedarr. The parts aren't that big and you can cut around knots. A few small knots won't compromise the strength or look bad, either.

Osborne Russell
06-19-2008, 05:04 PM
I highly recommend a mock-up of an Adirondack chair. I found that by moving the bottom of the seat back, and the top forward, not more than two inches for either, there's a considerable gain in back support and butt room. Plus, with your butt further back, there's more support under the backs of your legs. Much more comfortable.

Might as well make it fit the person who's going to use it.

Keith Wilson
06-19-2008, 05:13 PM
I used 1xs, not the fence slats which are thinner. If you wanted a sturdier chair you could use the 5/4 deck boards (actually about 1.1 or so), but they don't come very wide (6" nominal I think), so you might need to edge-glue two of 'em to make the back leg or the arms, depending on the design. Pre-drilling for the screws is a very good idea. I wouldn't use epoxy as a finish anywhere but the end grain on the bottom of the legs. As glue in addition to the fasteners it would be fine.

MattL
06-19-2008, 05:31 PM
I made a pair for my wife for mothers day. one out of hickory, the other out of some maple I've had for years. Also made a table out of poplar from the orange box. I've made them out of redword but they are just too flimsy. Guess I need thicker stuff. Will photo and send those if anyone intersted. I got the plans from Norm Abrams book, the table I made up to match -no plans except what I drew. I like Norm's because they have a curved back.

Canoez
06-19-2008, 08:07 PM
Canoez, where did you find the plans for your chairs? I like the look of the curved back and seat. Most online plans that I have come across so far look similar to the plans that Kaa posted.

Lance


Lance,

I got my shape from a set of templates that a friend had. He'd been fine-tuning chairs at his camp for a number of years and when he got a pattern he finally liked, he made masonite templates of the parts to trace. I guess Matt's suggestion for Norm Abrams' book is a good one if it has curved back. Woodworking stores and catalogs usually have a bunch of plans for these chairs.

I've seem some neat customization of these chairs over the years. For example, one design had a small block that was bonded to the end of the arm and a Forstener bit had been used to drill a can size hole into the end of the arm. Another was for a reader and had a magazine/newspaper rack built into the side so that his reading material wouldn't blow away when he'd stepped away from the chair. Yet another had a double seat that was hinged in the front. When you flipped the seat out, there was a foot-rest. One neat one had a hinged tabletop that flipped over the arm like an airline tray-table so you could eat in your chair. Lotsa neat stuff - umbrella brackets on the back of the chair for some extra shade... Your imagination could go wild.

Bob Smalser
06-19-2008, 09:03 PM
Western Red almost always has a severely tapered lower log. If you take your waste from the pith instead of the slab when milling, you produce clear tapered boards perfect for crude lawn furniture.

I make these on site using patterns for the legs and carve the profiles with a chain saw. Galvy nails into green cedar work as well as anything. I can make almost a dozen a day and give the excess away to neighbors. Some even clean them up with rasps and paint them.

http://pic20.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/2594265/30531628.jpg

For fancier use your imagination. Just remember that resetting the yard furniture after a windstorm is a PIA, and often heavier scantlings like below are best. But that's another advantage of the Adirondack....even the light ones don't blow over easily.

http://pic20.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/2594265/322014967.jpg

Jim Ledger
06-20-2008, 06:35 AM
These are some of the chairs that I mentioned earlier. They're made from Ipe decking and are WAY too heavy, but you should be able to get a clear idea of the construction. As mentioned, some experimentation should be done to get the optimal angles and dimensions for comfort. Seat height, back radius, angle between the seat and back are some of the factors to consider and make a big difference in seating comfort.

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m193/searover1916/Adirondackchair1.jpg

I saw this design when my wife and I were on our honeymoon, touring the back rows of the boatyards of Marylands Eastern Shore. We found a set of these chairs on some National Seashore property, found them very comfortable. I took a series of photos, using my shoe as a scale reference and later made a prototype, then a run of twenty, most of which were sold or given away. These are their replacements after eighteen years of use.

This picture shows the construction quite well.

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m193/searover1916/Adirondackchairs2.jpg

switters
06-20-2008, 11:10 AM
built the work bench last night and picked up a bunch of cedar slats from the store, I'll double the legs(laminate) and use the 5/8 for the slats.

Thanks for the input and especially the pictures, I'm now motivated.

Don Olney
06-20-2008, 01:09 PM
Here is a patio table with benches that I built out of Western Red Cedar:

http://www.zenfolio.com/img/v2/p325292777-3.jpg

http://www.zenfolio.com/img/v2/p22086346-3.jpg

http://www.zenfolio.com/img/v2/p82664677-3.jpg

http://www.zenfolio.com/img/v2/p114477649-3.jpg

Captain Blight
06-20-2008, 01:19 PM
Mr Leger, could you take some more photos with your shoe in for scale? Those are exactly what I'm after myownself. If you don't feel like limping around half-shod, perhaps a can of beer or even a ruler would be great!

Keith Wilson
06-20-2008, 02:03 PM
One more suggestion - if you don't have a plan for a chair you know is comfortable (one you've already sat in), make the legs a little long so you can adjust it by cutting them shorter. You can change both the angle and the height this way. The other two critical dimensions are the seat depth and the angle between the back and the seat, but it's harder to change them after the chair is built.

Jim, is that really the color of weathered ipe? You didn't paint them purple? Must be, the grass looks normal and I can see the grain.. No one will ever mistake it for cedar, that's for sure.

Jim Ledger
06-20-2008, 05:13 PM
really[/i] the color of weathered ipe? You didn't paint them purple? Must be, the grass looks normal and I can see the grain.. No one will ever mistake it for cedar, that's for sure.

No, Kieth, that was some creative ? photoshopping. These are nearer the right color.

Captain Blight, maybe these will help. Keiths suggestion about keeping the legs long is good. The actual dimensions can very from design to design, but if I was making some, I'd mock up some of the parts and try them out before actually building the chairs. Often a slight change can make a big improvement in comfort. It's often an individual thing as we're all different shapes and what suits one may not suit another.

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m193/searover1916/DSCF5601.jpg

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m193/searover1916/DSCF5602.jpg

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m193/searover1916/DSCF5603.jpg

switters
06-20-2008, 05:32 PM
well now that I have learned the ways of photo bucket and have a set of plans (thanks Mr. Boyle) I guess we will see what kind of progress we make by Monday. Just found out the GF is going to be around this weekend and I told her I am building chairs, she wanted to know if I was building chairs in the garage and would there be enough room for her to start glueing her skiff together. I just might keep her around a while longer.

Thanks again for everyones help, hints and inspiration.

Jim Ledger
06-20-2008, 05:41 PM
Thanks again for everyones help, hints and inspiration.

Hold on there, Switters, I'm not through yet. Here's the original cedar chairs, for comparison purposes only, you understand. Note the thinness of the cedar fencing. Flexed a bit but lasted quite well.

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m193/searover1916/original2.jpg

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m193/searover1916/original1.jpg

ishmael
06-20-2008, 07:04 PM
Pretty well covered.

Um, chair design is a delicate topic. People come in such various sizes and shapes you have to design to a median. The Adirondack chairs out there get my vote. I like the one where the back splats are in a curve so they sorta cradle you. A bit more work, but I think it's worth it.

Hm, materials. There's enough white pine around here that with a bit of work one could go to the great beyond making it into chairs. If you could find someone who was sawing it!

switters
06-24-2008, 04:17 PM
Thanks Jim, I feel a little more confident now in using the fence slats. I didn't get started on the chairs, I built the shelves for the skiff/bookcase and got the sides on another skiff for the GF who wants her own boat now and doesn't mind sitting on the beer cooler out back.

http://i281.photobucket.com/albums/kk221/switters_bucket/DSC01487.jpg


should have rotated the photo, but thats the general idea.