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View Full Version : Anyone effected by the US floods?



skuthorp
06-18-2008, 10:09 PM
Reports here of continuing problems in Illinois now, hitting the farmers hard.

Captain Blight
06-18-2008, 10:22 PM
If it dries out sometime soon, there's time for the farmers to get hundred-day corn in. Probably won't be able to take advantage of the $9/bu pricing though. It's hitting me personally--I was scheduled to go back to the boat today and it's tied up until the flooding subsides.

elf
06-18-2008, 10:28 PM
Nobody's talking about what's going to happen when this thing hits NOLA.

brad9798
06-18-2008, 11:11 PM
Pretty scary not far from me ... not nearly as bad as 1993, but close to 1995 flooding ...

Hell- I cannot get to my boat now ... but I did ... with my SeaDoo.

Put in about three miles from the marina ... and rode over the normal paved roads ... to get there.

Pretty freaky, really.

C. Ross
06-18-2008, 11:24 PM
Glad to hear you're ok Brad. Wonder about Boylesboat and others.

Iowa and Illinois are really getting whacked. Property damage mostly.

I haven't heard about a big risk to New Orleans, Emily. The river is pretty steep with many levees protecting natural floodplains from Minnesota down through St. Louis where the lock and dam system ends. After there it levels out, and the channel is two or three times wider, or more. Lots more room for flood waters to spread out.

Up river the water was rising through today, and the flow seems slower, as the dams are closed to hold as much water as possible upstream.

Captain Blight
06-18-2008, 11:55 PM
Upper and Lower St Anthony looked a little slower than normal when I was out bicycling today, didn't get down to L&D 1. I guess every little bit helps but... If we get any sort of heavy rain here in Minn, downstream is going to be hosed.

Keith Wilson
06-19-2008, 08:40 AM
Well, my sister's office in the music building at the University of Iowa is on the first floor. Fortunately they managed to shift everything movable upstairs, including sixty-odd pianos. It's going to be a big mess when the water goes down. No problem with her house; it's a long way from the river.

Mrleft8
06-19-2008, 08:58 AM
We'll all be affected in a little bit with prices for anything with corn sweetener (Just about everything these days) skyrocketing.

kharee
06-19-2008, 09:14 AM
My home town, Memphis, sits up on the river bluffs and very seldom floods. Levees were built in the early fifties where needed to prevent flooding.

Having watched the regular flooding and inundations of river towns and farms for 55 years enough is enough. I thinks aqueducts should be built to take the excessive flood water out to the mid-west and south-west regions of the country.

This would stop the regular catastrophic flooding along the course of the Mississippi river and solve the water shortage problem in the west. A well planned project similar to the original TVA project. With lessons learned about that project included in this project.

Lakes and reservoirs properly sited would open up a lot of the interior of America to resettlement and development.

Gary E
06-19-2008, 09:23 AM
I know a fellow in Iowa who lost his house and his machine shop is under 12 ft of water. The hand tools can be dropped in a drum of diesel fuel to preserve them, but the precision machine tools will most likely be lost.

Captain Blight
06-19-2008, 12:41 PM
My home town, Memphis, sits up on the river bluffs and very seldom floods. Levees were built in the early fifties where needed to prevent flooding.

Having watched the regular flooding and inundations of river towns and farms for 55 years enough is enough. I thinks aqueducts should be built to take the excessive flood water out to the mid-west and south-west regions of the country.

This would stop the regular catastrophic flooding along the course of the Mississippi river and solve the water shortage problem in the west. A well planned project similar to the original TVA project. With lessons learned about that project included in this project.

Lakes and reservoirs properly sited would open up a lot of the interior of America to resettlement and development.


Oh, yeah, that's exactly what's needed: More government spending to put people where they'll have to rely on government infrastructure to keep them alive there. And when the drain on the Mississippi gets too much, we can just shut the barge traffic down so Suburbistan has nice green lawns in the middle of the desert.

MiddleAgesMan
06-19-2008, 01:26 PM
Nobody's talking about what's going to happen when this thing hits NOLA.

True dat.

You can be sure no one in the administration is even thinking about it, certainly not planning for it.

Gary E
06-19-2008, 01:44 PM
WHAT is being done by the PEOPLE of New Orleans?
Are they PLANNING for what EVERYONE ELSE KNOWS WHAT"s COMMING????

or is it still party time to them and they dont even think it's comming??
or maybe it's ...soKay now... lets see what happens?
Try listining to the local radio http://www.wwl.com/
They are too buzzy talking about the baby Spears just had...to worry about the river...

Captain Blight
06-19-2008, 01:50 PM
I believe I'm inclined to agree with Gary, for once.

Gary E
06-19-2008, 02:11 PM
Capn
I grew up in Cincinnati... and back in the days before the high rise dams the river flooded EVERY YEAR, and EVERY year the people that lived down close to and sometimes within pissin distance of the rivers would get flooded out and have to be hauled out by the local's with jon boats...

TO FOOKIN STOOOPID to move...

jbelow
06-19-2008, 02:19 PM
True dat.

You can be sure no one in the administration is even thinking about it, certainly not planning for it.

Nor is the city government of the Big Easy!
Where is the outrage by the LIBTURD DEMOCRAPS against the Bush administration for the floods in the mid-west ?

If the Big Easy floods again maybe we can have an encore performance of the character and nature of it's citizens .

Tom Montgomery
06-19-2008, 02:45 PM
LIBTURD DEMOCRAPSThat's a good one, Spanky!

And it gives me the green light to refer to folks like you as MORAN REPUGNICS.

Thanx. :)

jbelow
06-19-2008, 02:52 PM
That's a good one, Spanky!

And it gives me the green light to refer to folks like you as MORAN REPUGNICS.

Thanx. :)

Your welcome , Libturd .

Tom Montgomery
06-19-2008, 02:57 PM
Home alone after school, jbelow?

kharee
06-22-2008, 08:37 PM
These floods have costs. We will pay any way. It makes more sense to pay and amortize the cost as a national domestic project. There should be water where ever the interstate system runs. Another homestead program would pay for it in the long run. People will buy land with access to water.

Look at it as a reversal of the dust bowl effect with a sustainable agriculture base. Water as long as the Mississippi flows.

As America loses its industry people will have to return to the land. Then the national development cycle will start all over when the farm population rises again. This is the history for all nations that manage to survive long enough.

Beowolf
06-22-2008, 08:58 PM
Pretty scary not far from me ... not nearly as bad as 1993, but close to 1995 flooding ...

Hell- I cannot get to my boat now ... but I did ... with my SeaDoo.

Put in about three miles from the marina ... and rode over the normal paved roads ... to get there.

Pretty freaky, really.


Pretty freaky indeed! God only knows what you could have sucked up in the pump!

I've got family in Manhattan KS. In '93, the river ended up about 1 mile from their home. We went to visit them about three years later and my uncle drove us into town and showed us the waterline, about 12 feet up on all the buildings. Haven't heard how the towns holding up right now.

Gary E
06-23-2008, 11:51 AM
Soon EVERYONE will be affected......

Record corn prices mean more expensive meat, dairy
Monday June 23, 12:22 pm ET
By Stevenson Jacobs, AP Business Writer Consumers to pay more for meat, dairy after Midwest floods send corn prices soaring

NEW YORK (AP) -- Raging Midwest floodwaters that swallowed crops and sent corn and soybean prices soaring are about to give consumers more grief at the grocery store. In the latest bout of food inflation, beef, pork, poultry and even eggs, cheese and milk are expected to get more expensive as livestock owners go out of business or are forced to slaughter more cattle, hogs, turkeys and chickens to cope with rocketing costs for corn-based animal feed.

More here..
http://biz.yahoo.com/ap/080623/midwest_flooding_food_prices.html?.v=1

boylesboats
06-23-2008, 12:06 PM
Pretty scary not far from me ... not nearly as bad as 1993, but close to 1995 flooding ...

Hell- I cannot get to my boat now ... but I did ... with my SeaDoo.

Put in about three miles from the marina ... and rode over the normal paved roads ... to get there.

Pretty freaky, really.

Hey Brad, how close are you to the river(s)?

Our flood stage is almost back to normal up here, still 2 feet above.. it was 10 feet above...
http://www.weather.gov/alerts/mo.html

Captain Blight
06-23-2008, 01:52 PM
Soon EVERYONE will be affected......

Record corn prices mean more expensive meat, dairy
Monday June 23, 12:22 pm ET
By Stevenson Jacobs, AP Business Writer Consumers to pay more for meat, dairy after Midwest floods send corn prices soaring

NEW YORK (AP) -- Raging Midwest floodwaters that swallowed crops and sent corn and soybean prices soaring are about to give consumers more grief at the grocery store. In the latest bout of food inflation, beef, pork, poultry and even eggs, cheese and milk are expected to get more expensive as livestock owners go out of business or are forced to slaughter more cattle, hogs, turkeys and chickens to cope with rocketing costs for corn-based animal feed.

More here..
http://biz.yahoo.com/ap/080623/midwest_flooding_food_prices.html?.v=1

A big part of the problem here is that there is a pretty strong incentive, both societal and built-in, for anybody with any sort of mental horsepower to get off the farm. now, before I get jumped on for being a urbanite elitist, I want to say that I KNOW there are exceptions to the rule. But in a lot of ways, we've entrusted the nation's food production to a group of 'D' students.

Farming is hard work. Sustainable farming even more so. But unless and until the nation can convince its farmers to get off a corn economy, the nation's food production will always be at the mercy of a monoculture.

Leon m
06-23-2008, 02:17 PM
http://www.woodenboat.com/forum/showthread.php?t=80984

brad9798
06-23-2008, 09:44 PM
As the crow flies, I am about three (3) miles from the Missouri ... not a problem that direction.

I am about six miles from the Mississippi ... thus, the flooding is only about three to four miles from my home. Where I live hasn't been under water in 'recorded' state history, so I am not worried.

PeterSibley
06-23-2008, 11:36 PM
I know a fellow in Iowa who lost his house and his machine shop is under 12 ft of water. The hand tools can be dropped in a drum of diesel fuel to preserve them, but the precision machine tools will most likely be lost.

Maybe , depends on how well packed with grease they were .We had local floods here 3 months ago and a friends workshop went under 6 foot .His lathe is OK ,the bearings etc were well full of grease .A bit of surface rust , but that's removable .The big problem was rebuilding the vehicles ..........engines , gearboxes and auto transmissions don't like being drowned .

boylesboats
06-23-2008, 11:45 PM
As the crow flies, I am about three (3) miles from the Missouri ... not a problem that direction.

I am about six miles from the Mississippi ... thus, the flooding is only about three to four miles from my home. Where I live hasn't been under water in 'recorded' state history, so I am not worried.

Thats good thing...
I am up on a hill a little, about a mile from Missouri, still can't see the river from here thou...
Unless I go here, (viewed from Wyeth Hill)
http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p182/boylesboats/ViewedWyethHill.jpg

brad9798
06-24-2008, 12:05 AM
Man, she is ROLLING, Larry! :eek:

boylesboats
06-24-2008, 09:43 AM
Man, she is ROLLING, Larry! :eek:

That photo is old... As you can see some sandbars along those turns.. That mean is only a few feet deep in those area..
Right now she is up the embankment a way...
If I get a moment I'll try to go up there and take another shot...