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View Full Version : The losing battle (pool)



cs
06-17-2008, 07:14 AM
Last year we went and put up one of those small above ground pools (15' x 4') for the kid to enjoy. We had no problem last year maintaining the water in the pool and at the end of the year we shocked the crap out of it and covered it. I didn't want to drain it because it cost a fortune to fill it.

This year I try to open the pool and I get the water from dark brown to light brown and finally clear up to a blue and than BAM the dang thing turns green. I spend a week or two and a bunch of chemicals and get it back to blue.

This last about a week and than it goes back green. Chemicals are good (according to our test and the pool places, but still the water has a green tint but is fairly clear.

Thinking I'm going to have to drain and start over.

Chad

Dan McCosh
06-17-2008, 07:22 AM
Stop eating asparagus.

Mrleft8
06-17-2008, 08:44 AM
How much have you spent on chemicals?

cs
06-17-2008, 09:00 AM
More than if I had drained it and started over.

The Chemical balance of the pool is where it needs to be. PH is good and so is alkalinity and chlorine. But yet the water persist in this green hue.

It is not the deep green, but a light green. I've hit it with algeicide.

The pool has a top skimmer filtration (paper) system and I've kept the filters backwashed. Every time I backwash I scrub the bottom of the pool with the brush. The vacuam doesn't do a great job of cleaning the bottom. I'm wondering if the green hue is from the dead algea that settles to the bottom? I need some way to filter from the bottom of the pool.

Chad

Katherine
06-17-2008, 09:08 AM
If the vacuum has a hose that hooks to the pump and filter, just take it and set it down by the bottom. If you role the pole so that the brush side is up, it will suck in water and send it through the filter.

Joe (SoCal)
06-17-2008, 09:15 AM
Who Needs a pool when ya got a boat ;)

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/IMG_0127.jpg

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/Tess/IMG_0136.jpg

Phil and I are talking about putting a wooden swim platform out in the mooring field and a ladder on the north dock. The hudson as our very own swimming hole. ;)

Does anyone have experience building and securing a swim platform in tidal waters ?

Paul Girouard
06-17-2008, 09:25 AM
Who Needs a pool when ya got a boat ;)

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/IMG_0127.jpg





And nice naturally green water as you can see, so whats the problem Chad , green is natural , right:confused: :D

cs
06-17-2008, 09:31 AM
Of course I remember looking at the photos Joe used to post of him playing in his above ground pool.

But anyway I'm trying to balance out the cost of buying an high dollar pool vacuam, more chemicals or draining and starting over.

All of this for less than 6,000 gallons.

Chad

Joe (SoCal)
06-17-2008, 09:36 AM
Of course I remember looking at the photos Joe used to post of him playing in his above ground pool.

But anyway I'm trying to balance out the cost of buying an high dollar pool vacuam, more chemicals or draining and starting over.

All of this for less than 6,000 gallons.

Chad

Oh that was an inflatable pool I bought at WallMart and took it down every year, pretty easy to maintain. Great fun, low maintenance.

Made by Intex

http://www.inflatable-swimming-pools.com/Intex-easy-set-pool_2.jpg

Mrleft8
06-17-2008, 09:37 AM
This is when having a well with absolutely incredible water flow comes in handy....

Joe (SoCal)
06-17-2008, 09:39 AM
This is when having a well with absolutely incredible water flow comes in handy....

Yea that was needed with that large inflatable pool I had, and it still took over two days to fill with a garden hose.

cs
06-17-2008, 09:39 AM
Joe mine is a Wal-mart special also. I didn't take it down because of the high cost of filling it up. Of course as mentioned I've spent more on chemicals than I would have if I had drained it and filled it up.

Oh and nothing beats being able to cool off quickly with a quick dip and not have to worrying about driving to the lake. That is the advantage of a pool in the backyard.

Chad

Katherine
06-17-2008, 09:39 AM
If it's the liner itself that is dirty, draining it or adding more chemicals won't solve the problem. You need to physically scrub the liner. You can either use a brush on a stick or get one of those $5 pool scrubbing mits, climb in, and start scrubbing. Stirring up the water will also help mor stuff go through the filter.

cs
06-17-2008, 09:40 AM
BTW ii took 3-1/2 days last time to fill it.

Chad

cs
06-17-2008, 09:41 AM
Katherine that is what I've been trying to do. I've been using the brush to keep the bottom scrubbed and particletes suspeneded and running the filter.

Chad

Thermo
06-17-2008, 09:45 AM
I have the same walmart pool, and it takes several days to fill from our well, out of caution, and for the fact that running the well too hard for too long brings up brown silt, which the normal pool filter will NOT remove on its own.

Whenever my pool gets discolored, and the chemicals / normal filter won't cut the mustard, I use this thing I got from a pool supply store called the "Slime Bag" 1 micron filter.

http://www.iecomart.com/slime-bag-products.html

It usually had the pool cleared up in a couple of days, then you remove it from the output hose on the pump and just tun the normal filter.

The "slime bag", when used with the blue walmart 'water clarifier' liquid, usually gets the water ridiculously clear.

Katherine
06-17-2008, 09:46 AM
Try running a long intake hose from the bottom center of the pool to the pump & filter. Mom and Dad used to have a large above ground pool that was about 9ft deep in the center. That was the most effective way to filter the water from the deep section.

Joe (SoCal)
06-17-2008, 09:46 AM
Joe mine is a Wal-mart special also. I didn't take it down because of the high cost of filling it up. Of course as mentioned I've spent more on chemicals than I would have if I had drained it and filled it up.

Oh and nothing beats being able to cool off quickly with a quick dip and not have to worrying about driving to the lake. That is the advantage of a pool in the backyard.

Chad

Yea, feel ya Chad, when I lived up in the woods 6 miles from the Hudson the WalMart pool was a live saver. Now I live 4 blocks from the Hudson and can zip down on my bike in 30 seconds and jump in.

The idea of a swim platform out in the mooring field is just such a cool idea and I think a real gift to the boat club that it HAS to be done.

I wont hijack this thread with it but it would make an interesting thread for the logistics and build.

Good luck with your pool I suspect by next week you will post swimming photos.

cs
06-17-2008, 10:00 AM
I've toyed with the idea of making a filter using a 5 gallon bucket and my clearwater pump. I like the slime bag. And yes Katherine I think somehow I need to try and filter from the bottom.

Chad

boylesboats
06-17-2008, 10:23 AM
Last year we went and put up one of those small above ground pools (15' x 4') for the kid to enjoy. We had no problem last year maintaining the water in the pool and at the end of the year we shocked the crap out of it and covered it. I didn't want to drain it because it cost a fortune to fill it.

This year I try to open the pool and I get the water from dark brown to light brown and finally clear up to a blue and than BAM the dang thing turns green. I spend a week or two and a bunch of chemicals and get it back to blue.

This last about a week and than it goes back green. Chemicals are good (according to our test and the pool places, but still the water has a green tint but is fairly clear.

Thinking I'm going to have to drain and start over.

Chad
We have same problem every year in our pool.. It's very simple to fix.
Shock the **** out it, then add Algaecide and stain remover... check your ph level.. back wash your pump often during opening.. It'll take about a week to back normal..
We use only chlorine, it smell better than that expensive and funky smellin' "Baquacil"

We never drain our pool.. because fear of sides collapsing inward

Mrleft8
06-17-2008, 03:06 PM
Or you could get a bucket of snails......

John of Phoenix
06-17-2008, 03:31 PM
Is it possible to keep up the maintenance when the pool is not in use?

cs
06-17-2008, 04:01 PM
John before it turned green I had it clear and blue and even had been in it. It than turned green and I fought and got it back to blue and it lasted about a week and turned green on me again.

Chad

hokiefan
06-17-2008, 04:28 PM
If its been green, then you got it clear and blue again there is still algae in there. It will bloom in about 20 minutes if you give it half a chance. You can't even let the chlorine get close to low or it will turn green again overnight. Ask me how I know! After you get it clear, shock the crap out of it, run the filter a lot, and keep the chlorine on the high side for at least a week. If you check the chlorine every day you'll start to see when it stops consuming chlorine, then you'll know everything is dead. Been there done that.

Cheers,

Bobby

brad9798
06-17-2008, 06:59 PM
Pools require an hour or two a week of maintenance per week, regardless of size.

Chlorine and pH are only half the equation ... the other half is a pool brush, and a weekly vacuuming.

Beyond that, you will need algacide ... many forms of algae have grown quite immune to 'normal' levels of chlorine-- thus, the term 'Shock.'

Another MAJOR thing folks forget is the CLARIFIER ... clarifier actually bonds to the partices in the water, and drops them to the bottom of the pool ... for the VACUUM to remove.

I have had a pool my whole life ... and worked on them during summers in college.

Certain trees around/over the pool can aggravate the water ... evergreens, especially.

I'd be happy to answer any more questions ... PM me.

brad9798
06-17-2008, 07:01 PM
Hokiefan has a good point ... high chlorine won't hurt you ... it's the pH that messes with your eyes.

The filter MUST be run, in hot weather, at least 18-20 hours a day to effectively maintain water clarity.

coelacanth2
06-17-2008, 09:05 PM
We were given a similar small pool, neighbor had used it for years with reasonable maintenance. His yard was relatively open. In our yard, heavily treed,it was a nightmare. Every other day skimming half a bag of leaves and bugs, fussing with the chemicals, fishing out the dead squirrels. also, since it was constantly shaded, it was rather chilly. Got one of those big inflatable slides instead, much more fun, although 3 years of such completely wore it out.

StevenBauer
06-17-2008, 09:17 PM
fishing out the dead squirrels.



Hmmm...maybe we need to get a pool... ;)


Steven

The Bigfella
06-17-2008, 09:30 PM
Our pool decided to explode about a week back - same size as yours Chad. We heard this big "thud" and thought that a tree had come down. 10,000 or so gallons of water flowing through the aviary and down the back lane was rather interesting. One nice benefit was that any mice under the aviary are staying there - permanently. Another is that my daughter's pet duck likes the remnant pond.

cs
06-17-2008, 09:35 PM
Well I can tell you that we have shocked the hell out of it, but the chlorine is back down today. Like mentioned sure sign of algea still there. I need to get more shock and knock the crap out of it again.

Chad

Alexander2
06-17-2008, 09:46 PM
I've known many people who have or had a pool and almost without exception they were happier the day they got rid of it than they day they got it.
The exceptions are some who have them professionally maintained [and can well afford that] and even some of those people think the costs exceed the benefits.
Kind of like owning a wooden boat.

Of all the real estate deals I've been involved in I'd say in about half the sales the pools were an asset and in the other half they were a neutral or negative value in the buyers eyes.

Even worse odds when selling a wooden boat.

Pools and wooden boats, lots of maintenance for the hours of use.
Wood boat maintenance can be enjoyable but no one I know likes keeping a pool clean.

brad9798
06-17-2008, 09:57 PM
FORGET SHOCK ... getsome aglacide ... SIMPLE,SIMPLE to keep a pool ...

CHLORINE will disappear in 24-48 hours ALL THE TIME without STABILIZER!

PM me, Chad ... I will save you money and time ... :rolleyes:

brad9798
06-17-2008, 09:59 PM
Alexander2- EXACTLY! For every buyer that wants a pool there is one that sees it as a detriment!

ME? I LOVE POOLS!

pipefitter
06-17-2008, 11:25 PM
We 'had' an above ground pool. I knew it was a setup for another chore for the dad and I serviced pool pumps. It came with the cartridge filter and we had the problems you describe. I was always cleaning the thing. Finally, the place where I got my pump parts at talked me into a DE filter and a proper pool pump.The use of chemicals was cut in half seemingly over night and no more red eyes after swimming.

brad9798
06-18-2008, 10:06 PM
Chad-

If you are burning through chlorine that fast, I have one recommendation for you:

BUY SOME 'STABILIZER.'

You MUST have stabilizer!

Brad

cs
06-19-2008, 06:20 AM
As I mentioned in the e-mail just now to Brad I have a stabilizer duckie in the pool that keeps me good/high in stabilizer. This afternood I plan on double shocking and algecide. Right now the pool is just a hazy very light green. If double shocking and algeicide don't fix it I may just drain it, clean it and start over.

Chad

Milo Christensen
06-19-2008, 06:45 AM
At this point, you have so many toxic chemicals in the pool you'll have to apply to the EPA for a special permit and have the "water" hauled away in a hazmat truck at about a $1 a gallon.

cs
06-19-2008, 06:53 AM
Nah, the algea is eating up the chemicals as fast as I put them in. LOL

Chad

cs
06-19-2008, 09:22 AM
So here is a thought, and hear me out. Pool vacuums are pretty expensive, too much for a cheap wal-mart above ground pool.

But I do have a 1" clearwater pump and some hose. What if I got one of those slime filters and put it on the output side of my pump and than use the clearwater pump to clean up the silt on the bottom?

Chad

Katherine
06-19-2008, 09:31 AM
Pool Vacuum head on a pole, less then $20.
http://www.poolcenter.com/coolpool_poolstor.htm

Canoez
06-19-2008, 09:32 AM
Chad, I think I found your problem! ;):rolleyes:


John before it turned green I had it clear and blue and even had been in it. It than turned green and I fought and got it back to blue and it lasted about a week and turned green on me again.

Chad

cs
06-19-2008, 09:56 AM
Now was that neccessary? ;)

Katherine don't you still need a pump to run those? Or do you just run it off of your existing filter pump? Do those get the silt?

I have a lot of experiance with pools, but all of my experiance is on the user end not the maintainer end.

Chad

boylesboats
06-19-2008, 10:00 AM
Chad,
You didn't mentioned that you got a pool from Wally World... Our pool is above the ground, about $4,000.00 installed.. 20' X 52" with 25 years warranty on the liner
Not a cheapo...

SamSam
06-19-2008, 10:08 AM
Have you looked into having a salt water pool instead of using all the other chemicals?

Canoez
06-19-2008, 10:15 AM
Now was that neccessary? ;)

Chad

:D - of course! Would you have respected me if I didn't pick up on that one?

Katherine
06-19-2008, 11:54 AM
Now was that neccessary? ;)

Katherine don't you still need a pump to run those? Or do you just run it off of your existing filter pump? Do those get the silt?

I have a lot of experiance with pools, but all of my experiance is on the user end not the maintainer end.

Chad
http://i.walmartimages.com/i/p/00/08/77/91/18/0008779118030_500X500.jpg

Katherine
06-19-2008, 11:56 AM
http://i.walmartimages.com/i/p/00/08/77/91/19/0008779119206_500X500.jpg

cs
06-19-2008, 11:57 AM
Katherine, I have most of that stuff. I've the little rubber duckie thing for dispensing stabilizer. I've the leave net thing. I've 2 different water hose driven vacuums. I also have a bottom brush and a bottom scrubbing pad.

What I don't have is a vacuum for getting the silt off of the bottom.

Chad

cs
06-19-2008, 12:01 PM
Kat, do those vacuums hook up to existing filters or do you have to buy a special pump?

i.e. Salt water, if ever I get a bigger pool, be it above ground or below, it will be a salt water pool.

Chad

Katherine
06-19-2008, 12:02 PM
Take the water hose vacuum that hooks to the pool pump, stick it down in the bottom and leave it there for awhile. Do you have the cover plate tp block off the wall skimmer while you're using the vacuum? If you don't block the skimmer inlet, you won't get any suction through the vacuum hose.

Katherine
06-19-2008, 12:03 PM
Since the pics came from the wal mart site, they should hook into the existing pump.

Katherine
06-19-2008, 12:09 PM
Is this your pump set up?
http://i.walmartimages.com/i/p/00/08/77/91/80/0008779180180_500X500.jpg

cs
06-19-2008, 12:10 PM
The water hose vacuum that I have doesn't hook up to the filter at all. It uses a waterhose and than has a mesh filter bag on the end to catch debris. Brad told me, and I agree, that this is just for large items (i.e. leaves).

I need to find a silt filter that will connect to my existing pump. Something like what you show, but I don't need all that extra stuff shown with that kit.

Chad

Katherine
06-19-2008, 12:13 PM
Check out the first link I posted, but you will need the cover plate that blocks off the wall skimmer. By using the vacuum that hooks to the pump, you'll force the dirty water in the bottom of the pool through the filter. The first Kit I posted was less then $25.

cs
06-19-2008, 12:15 PM
My pump and filter set up is not that nice. The skimmer is basicy a floating basket that has a hose that goes to the filter/pump.

I will look more this afternoon when I got to the store to get more shock and algecide.

Chad

Katherine
06-19-2008, 12:19 PM
Unhook the floating basket and hook up the vacuum hose. You can stick as many chemicals in it as you want, but that won't remove the physical particals from the water and liner.

cs
06-19-2008, 12:29 PM
You see I'm really more pool dumb than I thought. I just need to buy some hose and a vacuum head for small stuff and let the pump I have do the work. Duh!

Thanks for helping me see the error of my ways.

Chad

Katherine
06-19-2008, 12:32 PM
No problem. I had Mom and Dad's pool to learn on.

Here's another tip. Tell your daughter if she wants to use the pool, she has to clean it. ;):D

BrianW
06-19-2008, 01:20 PM
I had forgotten that in some places you pay for water by the gallon.

cs
06-20-2008, 06:34 AM
Well today is the day. I've either beat it or it has beat me. Yesterday evening I double shocked it, hit it with algeicide and bottom vacuumed it. I left the filter running and pulling off of the bottom of the pool.

This morning when I went out there the water went from green to murky blue. If it is not clear by the time I get home I will probably drain the thing and scrub the bottom and than re-fill.

Chad

Katherine
06-20-2008, 08:16 AM
Murky blue is an improvement. Check the chemical levels and give it another couple of days with the pump drawing from the bottom and vacuuming. You need to have a little patience with it.:p

Besides, if you drain and refill, you could end up with the very same problem.

cs
06-20-2008, 08:19 AM
I checked the levels this morning and everything was good. The chlorine was high, which is okay. The akalinity was in the low/good range and the PH was good. Water is a little hard and the stabilizer is still a little high.

Chad

Katherine
06-20-2008, 08:22 AM
High chlorine is probably causing the murkiness. Give it a day or two to degas a little.

Michael s/v Sannyasin
06-20-2008, 10:38 AM
dang Katherine, you should get out of the car business, move to San Diego and open your own "Pool Girl" business

cs
06-22-2008, 08:43 AM
If something drastic doesn't happen to the pool between now and the time I get done cutting the grass, I'm draining the damn thing scrubbing it down and filling it back up. Summer will be over before the stupid thing clears up. :(

Chad

Mrleft8
06-22-2008, 09:42 AM
Put some visine in it..... If it gets the red out, maybe it'll get the green out too.....:D

rufustr
06-22-2008, 05:13 PM
We inherited our in ground pool when we bought this house nearly 5 years ago.
Th pool is 12.5 metres (41 Feet) long x 5.5 metres (18 feet) wide x 2.4 metres (8 feet) deep at the deep end, and was built in 1952.
Very expensive to maintain considering no one in the family used it.
About a year ago it developed a significant leak, and we ended up getting a warning from the local council for excessive water use.
After draining the pool I discovered that due to the long dry spell the pool had broken its back.
I have decided it is far cheaper to demolish the pool and landscape the area, than to try to fix it.
Strangely that will also help our resale value when we sell the house shortly, it seems not many people want to take on the cost of maintaining a big pool like this one.

cs
06-25-2008, 09:35 AM
Just in case anyone was wondering, the pool has been drained, scrubbed and is in the process of getting new water. While I had it down I took the chance to level the site a bit better.

Chad

pipefitter
06-25-2008, 11:06 AM
The small paper filter in those above ground pools will clog nearly instantly if you have algae solids in the water, especially if you vacuum it off the bottom. The best I could ever do with ours was to siphon the solids out as best I could (the pump circulation kept it in the center) and replace that water and it would help. The only long term solution I found to keep it clear through the season was to refill it every season to rid the dormant algae before it bloomed and the DE filter kept it in check and it was rated double size for the pool. All I had to do was look at the pressure gauge to tell when it needed back flushing. Cartridge filters will work but it better be a big one. The DE filter would go weeks before needing backwashing. I ended up changing the Hayward pump (junk) to a 1/2hp Sta-rite and never looked back.

Doing all you have done, I never got it past murky blue and the pool tech told me all I had really done was bleached the algae solids.