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elf
05-17-2008, 08:30 AM
Is it just me, or is everyone picking ticks off their heads just about every time they walk under a tree?

Dog ticks, seems I can't even go out and plant a row of peas out in the open where there is no tall grass without combing 2 or 3 of them out of my hair 20 minutes later.

Bah, humbug!

Phillip Allen
05-17-2008, 08:32 AM
It's them yankee tree ticks...we don't have them in the south...we got gronicle ticks "down" here (pun intended)

Tylerdurden
05-17-2008, 08:32 AM
They are way out of control this year. I spray my hat with 100% DEET before venturing too far into the wild.
The little bastards are pole vaulting this year.:D

elf
05-17-2008, 08:35 AM
'T'aint just gronicles.

bamamick
05-17-2008, 08:36 AM
Uh, no. I haven't had a tick on me since I was about five years old. I haven't even had to worry about any on the dogs in I can't tell you how long. The 'swamp' cats (as to differentiate them from the 'house cats') pick up these little ticks that look like spiders. My wife checks them regularly, but the dogs stay out of them.

Mickey Lake

Tylerdurden
05-17-2008, 08:38 AM
Not to get all conspiracy and all but do you know the story behind Lyme disease?

Plum Island is where ground zero plots out.

Phillip Allen
05-17-2008, 08:39 AM
I really hate them big uns that get behind my ears and in the corners of my eyes

botebum
05-17-2008, 09:19 AM
My bout with a tick last year- RMSF (http://www.woodenboat.com/forum//showthread.php?t=69352)

Doug

Tylerdurden
05-17-2008, 11:22 AM
I don't know if we have that up here but I got the Lyme disease in upstate NY. I know there was a reason I never liked it there:D

I guess its all over the Place now.

Dutch
05-17-2008, 11:36 AM
I probably average 20 tick bites a year.

Ticks dont compare with chiggers. Roll in a nest of chiggers one time and youll wish it had been ticks. At least ticks you can see.

SchoonerRat
05-17-2008, 01:06 PM
We city folk here in So. Cal. aren't bothered too much by ticks.

We're not bothered too much by clean air either!

crawdaddyjim50
05-17-2008, 03:27 PM
I have noticed a large surge in the flora and fauna this year. The pollen from the pines is amazingly abundant. My sinuses are on strike.

Went to the wildlife reserve behind my house to shoot pictures of birds as their young fledged out and came back with at least 20 chigger bites on each leg. I was wearing long pants and boots with OFF spray all over me. It was not a fun evening..

Anybody see the article about the frog invasion out in California? Some town was being inundated by thousands of them.

Phillip Allen
05-17-2008, 05:39 PM
I have noticed a large surge in the flora and fauna this year. The pollen from the pines is amazingly abundant. My sinuses are on strike.

Went to the wildlife reserve behind my house to shoot pictures of birds as their young fledged out and came back with at least 20 chigger bites on each leg. I was wearing long pants and boots with OFF spray all over me. It was not a fun evening..

Anybody see the article about the frog invasion out in California? Some town was being inundated by thousands of them.

Was it in Calavaris County?

crawdaddyjim50
05-17-2008, 05:44 PM
Not sure, but it was near a fairly big town.

Phillip Allen
05-17-2008, 05:45 PM
(sigh)

Mrleft8
05-17-2008, 09:27 PM
'Tis the season. The nasty lil' black leg ticks (xodides scapuletta.....or somesuch) are hatching now. Smaller than the head of a common pin, they have a 12% chance (if infected) of transfering lyme disease to you if they bite you for a mere 48 hours...... After 72 hours it goes up to a 75% infection rate. Their bites do not hurt. You will not notice them until you get a red rash or an itch.....By then............. Trust me it sux majorly....I have what has been termed "Chronic Lyme disease".... It sux. Check yourself after any walks in the woods, marsh, long grass, if you have ANY pets that spend ANY time outside. Imagine having arthritis, and the flu, and mono-nucleosis all at the same time. That's Lyme disease.

crawdaddyjim50
05-17-2008, 09:40 PM
(sigh)

Aahhhh now I get it. Sorry was just a little too subtle for me toaday. ;D

WX
05-17-2008, 09:57 PM
We get two types:
Bottle ticks, otherwise known as Kangaroo ticks...pretty much harmless.
Shellbacks, otherwise known as Paralysis ticks, these little buggers can kill a cow. They can also make a human pretty crook. You usually know fairly quick if you have one latched on.
I've heard of chiggers, they sound like scrub mites (nymph ticks here). They tend to get around your waistband and give the feeling of being on fire....not nice.

crawdaddyjim50
05-17-2008, 10:06 PM
Yep, they like the areas where your clothing is close to the body or where the skin folds. Leave a itching oozing pustual (sp) when they burrow into you.

Mrleft8
05-17-2008, 10:07 PM
Yanno............... Leads one to wonder.......... I never really thought about other critters and bugs..... Other than cats, dogs, deer, mice.... But last year I came across a Box Tortoise that was being swarmed by mosquitoes.... The damned things were tormenting the poor turtle.... So I gave his (her?) shell a squirt of "OFF" and it blinked at me and wandered off into the woods.... Hopefully I didn't poison it, but at least I gave it a few moments of peace.... And no it wasn't snapping up all the bugs that were feeding off it.

glenallen
05-17-2008, 10:26 PM
"Paralysis ticks"

Now there's a colorful and informational name for a tick! Holy smokes!
I get a few tick bites every summer and many chigger bites.
I'm with Dutch, ticks don't compare wih chiggers. But as far as I know, chiggers don't cause serious diseases like ticks can.
My only serious tick bite was eight years ago this summer.
I had picked off a few ticks but thought little of it except the usual mild disgust at being slowly eaten by prehistoric critters.
Then I noticed that I was unusually sleepy after being up only an hour or two in the morning.
At the time, I was working in my own gardens and spent all my time on my own property. So, I began to take a nap around ten o'clock in the morning. I'd get up, go back to the gardens, and soon feel groggy again. I'd eat lunch and take another nap. Same in the afternoon. I'd sleep all night.
After a few days I took my temperature and it was slightly above normal but not much.
I went on a few more days with no improvement, so I went to see the doctor.
Blood test reavealed what the doctor called "deer tick fever". He told me a scientific name also but I don't recall it.
He prescribed some pills and I took them. That same night my temperature reached 105. I think if I'd waited a couple more days going to the doctor I would have suffered real damage or death. My doc said people who don't die often suffer brain damage, but I've not noticed any...any...any...any...

jbelow
05-17-2008, 11:02 PM
"Paralysis ticks"

Now there's a colorful and informational name for a tick! Holy smokes!
I get a few tick bites every summer and many chigger bites.
I'm with Dutch, ticks don't compare wih chiggers. But as far as I know, chiggers don't cause serious diseases like ticks can.
My only serious tick bite was eight years ago this summer.
I had picked off a few ticks but thought little of it except the usual mild disgust at being slowly eaten by prehistoric critters.
Then I noticed that I was unusually sleepy after being up only an hour or two in the morning.
At the time, I was working in my own gardens and spent all my time on my own property. So, I began to take a nap around ten o'clock in the morning. I'd get up, go back to the gardens, and soon feel groggy again. I'd eat lunch and take another nap. Same in the afternoon. I'd sleep all night.
After a few days I took my temperature and it was slightly above normal but not much.
I went on a few more days with no improvement, so I went to see the doctor.
Blood test reavealed what the doctor called "deer tick fever". He told me a scientific name also but I don't recall it.
He prescribed some pills and I took them. That same night my temperature reached 105. I think if I'd waited a couple more days going to the doctor I would have suffered real damage or death. My doc said people who don't die often suffer brain damage, but I've not noticed any...any...any...any...

glen , it's nice to hear that you have somewhat recovered from the tick bites . Take up smoking and burn them suckers off when they jump on you . It dose hurt a bit when they get in those private places.

glenallen
05-17-2008, 11:24 PM
glen , it's nice to hear that you have somewhat recovered from the tick bites . Take up smoking and burn them suckers off when they jump on you . It dose hurt a bit when they get in those private places.

Hehe! I've become more protective of my old hide in recent years.
For one thing, I avoid tall grass, overhanging greenery, and leaning up against porch posts.
One good aspect of living up here is there are very few Mosquitoes!
How does that sound? Like Heaven?:D
I grew up in Lake Jackson near Freeport on the coast. I won't even bother to tell you the kind of mosquito hell that is.
Until I was about 16 I thought all people were pitiful victims of mosquitoes, and that mosquitoes were a pervasive human condition, then my family came up here on vacation one summer and people sat outside in the evenings around campfires and played music or visited without fear of mosquitoes.
And people don't get sopping wet with sweat up here like they do on the coast. Humidity here right now is probably 30% and in Vidor it might be 70%.
Have you spent any time in the Drylands or are you a native of Vidor?
Peace!

jbelow
05-18-2008, 01:15 AM
Hehe! I've become more protective of my old hide in recent years.
For one thing, I avoid tall grass, overhanging greenery, and leaning up against porch posts.
One good aspect of living up here is there are very few Mosquitoes!
How does that sound? Like Heaven?:D
I grew up in Lake Jackson near Freeport on the coast. I won't even bother to tell you the kind of mosquito hell that is.
Until I was about 16 I thought all people were pitiful victims of mosquitoes, and that mosquitoes were a pervasive human condition, then my family came up here on vacation one summer and people sat outside in the evenings around campfires and played music or visited without fear of mosquitoes.
And people don't get sopping wet with sweat up here like they do on the coast. Humidity here right now is probably 30% and in Vidor it might be 70%.
Have you spent any time in the Drylands or are you a native of Vidor?
Peace!

glen , I was born in Beaumont Texas , 2nd generation Texan . Lake Jackson and Freeport is a few hours drive from me. I have spent some time in North and West Texas . I like it . Much nicer than here but I do like the fishing in the salt.

Wild Dingo
05-18-2008, 07:41 AM
Now before yous mob start in on Texas and such I thought Id put me two bobs worth in on ticks

We get roo ticks a fair bit... gotta be carefull how you get the buggars off specially when theyre swollen fat with yer good oil... had one once that Jo nipped out and left the damned head in man that was right uncomfortable for a fair while

The paralisis tick is a nasty buggar and can make a human adult pretty damned crook but can bowl a nipper over faster... doesnt happen all that often but has been known to

aahhh what a wonderous country Aussie is!! Such a gentle friendly place where life is beautiful all the time :D

BrianW
05-18-2008, 10:37 AM
I knew there were good reasons to live up here.

John A. Campbell
05-18-2008, 04:03 PM
BrianW, you've got several good reasons to live in Sitka....a fine little town indeed. I was there in January-March, 1958 working for Stromberg-Carlson Co. out of Rochester, NY installing the very first telephone dial system (switching equipment). Is Bill Shield's "Sitka By The Sea" restaurant still there? What about the Kiksadi Club (sic?) a short distance from town?

Getting back to the tick problem, all you need to do to get rid of ticks is to start yourself a colony of Texas fire ants.....the fire ants will run the ticks off but then you'll have mounds of fire ants to deal with however they are easy to see and avoid plus they can be controlled with my famous East Texas Fire Ant Recipe....questions anyone?

glenallen
05-18-2008, 04:15 PM
Gotta have that recipe, John. I cultivate fire ants in my garden. They eat every other living bug and worm that shows up, but I'd like pour some whupass on those in my yard.
I paddle in Lake Belton occasionally.

Wild Wassa
05-18-2008, 04:17 PM
We have paralysis ticks on the east coast of Oz.

I nearly died from a tick after several doctors refused to acknowledge that the tick had burried itself in the back of my leg and the head had detatched and kept burrowing.

It was only when I collapsed at home, my wife came home at lunchtime to see how I was and Helen found me in a coma on the lounge room floor, that a Doctor took the bite seriously. My body shut down in hospital that evening. Some kind Doctor said to my wife, when I was admitted, "I've been observing his lack of movements, could he have been bitten by a tick?" She said, "He has been telling doctors that for the last week."

The doctor told me one week later that they had given up hope of me recovering, I had turned so septic. I could have sued no less than nine doctors who I had seen who each refused to acknowledge that the tick had burried itself and that I was being poisoned from tick toximia. One of the doctors, even asked me, "What is a tick? I'm new here I've just come from Western Australia." You should see the Western Australian Cattle Ticks, they are as big as a finger nail.

It was 3 months later that I got out of bed and went back to work after being poisoned by tick toxin. 3 months. Don't fcuk with Aussie east coast ticks.

Warren.

PeterSibley
05-18-2008, 04:56 PM
Agreed Wassa , nasty little buggars ..these days I can feel one crawling up my leg in my sleep !! Paranoia is a wonderful thing ! :(

WX
05-18-2008, 05:03 PM
I haven't had any ticks lately but the leeches have been a problem. I was doing a bit of work under the house last week and an hour later I felt something wet in my shirt...nice big fat leech. I looked like I had been shot.

John A. Campbell
05-18-2008, 06:04 PM
glenallen, here's the fire ant recipe:

5 lbs ...white self-rising cornmeal
1/2 cup...white corn syrup
1/2 cup....Concord grape juice
1 pint....water
2 teaspoons.....Orthene

Using plastic gloves, mix all ingredients in a bucket ....mix well...the mixture will be slightly damp when mixed properly. Just scatter a small amount on the beds and the little buggers will take it down into the nest because it's actually bait. It takes about 3-4 days before you see results but the overall effect is much better than straight Orthene and it also makes a can of Orthene go a long way.

Give me a ring sometime when you're in the area......I'm in the Belton phone book at 6300 Campbell Hill Road.