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J. Dillon
05-14-2008, 07:33 PM
have the last laugh. :eek:
JD

http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r104/carriagechic/amish.jpg

bamamick
05-14-2008, 07:37 PM
I sure as heck have never laughed at them. Quite honestly I have always admired them.

My dad and I were driving through either Missouri or Arkansas once and a kid (a young girl) whipped out across the road in front of us in a buggy. Two or three others in the back, heading to the ice cream stand on the side of the road. My father told me that they were Mennonite kids. She sure could handle that buggy.

Mickey Lake

Bob Smalser
05-14-2008, 07:49 PM
Stable depreciated over 50 years + 2 horses depreciated over 20 years @ X bales premium hay @ X tons of sweet feed @ X in vet services @ X in farrier services @ X man days of care + X in harness/buggy maintenance = how many compact cars? ;)

Concordia...41
05-14-2008, 07:51 PM
I was just going to say that I bet the price of hay is through the roof! Shoveling the remains is still free though ;)

BTW - there's like six things wrong in that picture and caption. :rolleyes:

J. Dillon
05-14-2008, 07:51 PM
I admire them too but I once found out they have a high rate of incest. That put them down a notch for me.

They sure know how to produce great tasting veggies.

I wonder if they have conversations like this one ?;)

JD

http://www.halfthedeck.com/images/Amish.jpg

Concordia...41
05-14-2008, 07:57 PM
I don't know Jack - my grandparents (mother's side) were Mennonite. Strict, harsh (maybe no-nonsense is a better description), frugal to a fault, and could cut you to the quick with a glance.

I'd take twenty physical beatings over the look of disappointment in my grandmother's glance. :( Stern folk, but I remember them being happy. Clean, neat, practical.

I was the youngest (by 7 years) and thus escaped the real punishment, but I quake at the memory of the day my cousins and I got in the chicken coop and chased the chickens for fun. Apparently they don't lay eggs for a while after that. :o:(

bamamick
05-14-2008, 08:02 PM
Ms. Margo, there was an article last night on the net stating that the price of hay has gone up 25% to around $140 per ton since last year, and that the number of horses being turned in to shelters has broken all records. Sadly, the national parks and forestry service rangers are reporting finding more dead horses, horses that have been shot and left on public lands, than ever before.

Although I missed it, it seems that it is illegal to process horse meat in the United States now? Many people believe that this will backfire on the people who love horses, as they are afraid that many horses will either suffer from starvation and neglect, or will be put down in an inhumane manner.

As a soft hearted, animal loving, tree hugger it really hurts my heart to read this stuff. Especially when every day I pass by fields of hay that will probably be left to rot since it isn't worth their cost to harvest it. Sad.

By the way (major thread drift), the Basset Hound Rescue of Alabama can not take any more dogs right now. They are full up. It's amazing what happens when America decides it has to cut back because of gas prices. May all be a coincidence, but I don't think so.

Mickey Lake

Tylerdurden
05-14-2008, 08:06 PM
I admire them too but I once found out they have a high rate of incest. That put them down a notch for me.


You know what they say, Incest is best son:eek::D

Too funny J.

paladin
05-14-2008, 08:14 PM
A couple of weeks before I went to the Butcher shop (Holy Cross Hospital) this last time...I made my bi-weekly trip to the local Amish Market where I get most of my stuff....a young man, about 7-8 years old was sitting outside watching a couple of younger kids and trying to work a piece of rope. I was curious as to what he was doing....but he was trying to make a crossover eye splice. He kept making an error in the first tuck so that the second would not lay smooth. After a couple minutes watching I walked over and very politely asked if I could see his rope.....then made the splice....then moved down, and we made one together, then another....he made a dozen or so and they all lay down properly...Then I did a Crow's foot....and another...and then he picked that up rather fast....as I was leaving he very politely said "thank you, sir"...I smiled and went inside. As I was leaving an older gentleman was talking to him and the boy nodded to me and the gentleman tipped his hat very politely. I decided to make some drawings of other useful knots "ala Hervey Garret Smith" that would be useful around the farm, somewhat like cartoons, and take them with me next trip. Perhaps the young man is there.....

bamamick
05-14-2008, 08:17 PM
Excellent, Chuck. Just outstanding.

You see, something so simple can mean so much to so many people. It does matter. Wow.

Your story really touched my heart. Just something as simple as that. God's blessings on you, Chuck. God's blessings.

Mickey Lake

botebum
05-14-2008, 08:25 PM
... the day my cousins and I got in the chicken coop and chased the chickens for fun. Apparently they don't lay eggs for a while after that. :o:(
Horse-hockey! Scooter chases the chickens and vice versa(very fun to watch:D) whenever she/they can. The dog has chased the chickens on occasion but the concern there is that she'll kill them. The "widders" have stayed steady @ 5-6 eggs a day from 6 "widders". BTW- My 82 year old neighbor named them "the widders" because my chickens and her are the "fastest women in the neighborhood":D
We're getting at least 6 more layers because we can't keep up with the demand @ $1.50 a dozen when the stores are selling @ near $3.00 and Scooter is gonna get her own basket to tote 'em in.

Doug

paladin
05-14-2008, 08:37 PM
The only time our chikkin's would git upset was when old Bozo would go into the chikkin yard with us......we would collect eggs, but dawg stayed outside....when mom wanted a chikkin fer dinner she would point to the one she wanted and old Bozo would have it in a heartbeat, not hurt it, just grab it and hold it for mom to wring it's neck.....then he wouldn't leave the kitchen until he got the liver and gizzards etc.......

Concordia...41
05-14-2008, 08:39 PM
I don't know Doug - I was 4 or 5 years old at the time, and believe you me, unless it came in a red and white bucket from the good Kentucky Colonel, I haven't touched a chicken since. :eek: :D

crawdaddyjim50
05-14-2008, 08:49 PM
It isn't that they quit laying. It is the fact that the eggs are scrambled when you crack them.

I built a movable coop that I saw in Mother Earth magazine last year or so. Holds 10 hens and has no bottom. Pick it up like a wheel barrow and move it around the yard. Only leave it in one spot long enough to get the bugs out and before they peck the grass gone. No bugs lots and lots of eggs.

botebum
05-14-2008, 09:12 PM
It isn't that they quit laying. It is the fact that the eggs are scrambled when you crack them.

I built a movable coop that I saw in Mother Earth magazine last year or so. Holds 10 hens and has no bottom. Pick it up like a wheel barrow and move it around the yard. Only leave it in one spot long enough to get the bugs out and before they peck the grass gone. No bugs lots and lots of eggs.

We've thought about trying a "chicken tractor" like you describe. Just ain't got 'round to it yet.

Doug

paladin
05-14-2008, 09:17 PM
I had my chikkins all trained......about same time every evening I would go to the yard with a couple cups of feed, whistle a couple of times, and the hens would come running, a couple would hop up on my knee and eat from my hand.......very bad move......that's how mom caught sunday dinner one sunday....my favorite little red hen ...hopped up on her lap and got her neck rung.......I didn't raise chikkins after that....

boylesboats
05-14-2008, 10:35 PM
Horse-hockey! Scooter chases the chickens and vice versa(very fun to watch:D) whenever she/they can. The dog has chased the chickens on occasion but the concern there is that she'll kill them. The "widders" have stayed steady @ 5-6 eggs a day from 6 "widders". BTW- My 82 year old neighbor named them "the widders" because my chickens and her are the "fastest women in the neighborhood":D
We're getting at least 6 more layers because we can't keep up with the demand @ $1.50 a dozen when the stores are selling @ near $3.00 and Scooter is gonna get her own basket to tote 'em in.

Doug

Gotta love 'em fresh eggs in the mornin'.. Because I miss havin' fresh farm eggs for breakfast..

boylesboats
05-14-2008, 10:39 PM
We got several Amish groups in our state...
I oughta pay a visit to one that have a sawmill..

moTthediesel
05-15-2008, 02:14 AM
We got several Amish groups in our state...
I oughta pay a visit to one that have a sawmill..

Lots of Amish sawmills here, and I'm afraid they have to buy diesel fuel to make the chips fly. :(

moT

boylesboats
05-15-2008, 03:04 AM
Lots of Amish sawmills here, and I'm afraid they have to buy diesel fuel to make the chips fly. :(

moT

some here are steam powered

PeterSibley
05-15-2008, 03:49 AM
It isn't that they quit laying. It is the fact that the eggs are scrambled when you crack them.

I built a movable coop that I saw in Mother Earth magazine last year or so. Holds 10 hens and has no bottom. Pick it up like a wheel barrow and move it around the yard. Only leave it in one spot long enough to get the bugs out and before they peck the grass gone. No bugs lots and lots of eggs.

We call those chook tractors , great idea but it only works on flat ground :D.Snakes find them very attractive .

PeterSibley
05-15-2008, 03:51 AM
Stable depreciated over 50 years + 2 horses depreciated over 20 years @ X bales premium hay @ X tons of sweet feed @ X in vet services @ X in farrier services @ X man days of care + X in harness/buggy maintenance = how many compact cars? ;)

Ever put 2 compact cars in the barn over winter and get a free motorbike come spring ?:rolleyes:

JTA
05-15-2008, 05:59 AM
I have told this story before I am sure. But ..

A couple of weeks after Katrina an elderly couple was standing in their yard looking at the remains of their house wondering what to do. A van filled with Mennonite men pulled up, and with very little discussion or talk at all, they walked into the house and began to clean it out. Several hours later, they had "gutted" the house. They looked at the elderly couple and said, "We will be back in two weeks with supplies to fix your house." They then loaded up, drove 2 blocks down, and did the same thing to another house. 2 weeks later they did in fact return, and rebuilt the house. They repeatedly thanked the elderly couple for allowing them to help.

The Mennonites have set up camps and still rotate into the area to help where they can. The mothers set up classrooms and teach the children while the men go out and volunteer. They helped a friend of mine build a house. He provided the materials and they provided 75% of the labor. His neighbor 2 blocks away could not afford the materials for his house, so the Mennonites provided the materials and the labor.

They do all this and completely shy away from any recognition. They have my respect

Jack

PeterSibley
05-15-2008, 06:19 AM
and mine Jack .People from a simpler time ,well worth learning from .

Tealsmith
05-15-2008, 08:07 AM
I hired a couple to work on my house once. Hard workers. I got my money's worth.

MiddleAgesMan
05-15-2008, 09:10 AM
I have told this story before I am sure. But ..

A couple of weeks after Katrina an elderly couple was standing in their yard looking at the remains of their house wondering what to do. A van filled with Mennonite men pulled up, and with very little discussion or talk at all, they walked into the house and began to clean it out. Several hours later, they had "gutted" the house. They looked at the elderly couple and said, "We will be back in two weeks with supplies to fix your house." They then loaded up, drove 2 blocks down, and did the same thing to another house. 2 weeks later they did in fact return, and rebuilt the house. They repeatedly thanked the elderly couple for allowing them to help.

The Mennonites have set up camps and still rotate into the area to help where they can. The mothers set up classrooms and teach the children while the men go out and volunteer. They helped a friend of mine build a house. He provided the materials and they provided 75% of the labor. His neighbor 2 blocks away could not afford the materials for his house, so the Mennonites provided the materials and the labor.

They do all this and completely shy away from any recognition. They have my respect

Jack

The Mennonite Disaster Relief organization sends their people all over the country, where ever needed. Post-Katrina, I was looking for the best place to send a donation and I finally settled on them.

JTA
05-15-2008, 09:17 AM
The Mennonite Disaster Relief organization sends their people all over the country, where ever needed. Post-Katrina, I was looking for the best place to send a donation and I finally settled on them.

I had several people ask where to make donations. I recommended the Mennonites to all. It is a very good organization.

kharee
05-15-2008, 09:52 AM
Dillon, you are referring to the effect of long term intermarriage not incest. This intermarriage has resulted in some serious medical conditions which are hereditary. Incest is not the proper word for the situation with the Amish. Shame on YOU! Why malign a good people. Get a horse boy.

Don Olney
05-15-2008, 01:38 PM
Mr. Dillon is correct. Incest and sexual abuse. Do a google search.

Also look up "Amish puppy mills."

paladin
05-15-2008, 01:52 PM
Yup....My cocker spaniel is a rescue from one of the Pennysylvania mills and she has a bad left hip joint from too much inbreeding.......a really sweet pup, which she wasn't when I got her...but it took a bunch of good vet care and home petting before she would play with other dogs.

Kaa
05-15-2008, 02:04 PM
I have told this story before I am sure. But ..

A couple of weeks after Katrina an elderly couple was standing in their yard looking at the remains of their house wondering what to do. A van filled with Mennonite men pulled up...

I don't think it has anything to do with them being Mennonites.

For example, the Burning Man people has been doing similar things post-Katrina and they are umm... let's say neither religious nor technology-averse :D

http://www.newsreview.com/sacramento/Content?oid=615862

http://www.burnerswithoutborders.org/

Kaa

Nanoose
05-15-2008, 02:10 PM
Interesting action considering their statement at one of the sites you referenced, Kaa, is "radical self reliance".

Kaa
05-15-2008, 02:17 PM
Interesting action considering their statement at one of the sites you referenced, Kaa, is "radical self reliance".

"Radical self-reliance" means if you think something needs to be done, you get off your ass and do it -- not wait for someone else to do it for you.

I think the Katrina relief efforts fit perfectly well. These people thought that they should go and help the Katrina victims. So they did. :-)

Kaa

Nanoose
05-15-2008, 03:27 PM
"Radical self-reliance" could also mean respecting eveyman's right to be radically self-reliant, which would exclude going in to help others and would show their Katrina efforts to not fit at all perfectly well.

JTA
05-15-2008, 03:33 PM
Thanks Kaa, I was not familiar with them at all. From the site you gave, they did a tremendous amount of work in Pearlington, MS. Very close to my home. We are thankful for all of the volunteers that came and continue to come.
I mentioned the Mennonites because I know first hand what they did. They are an amazing group of people.

jack

TimH
05-15-2008, 04:29 PM
Some day we will all wish we could live like the Amish.

Kaa
05-15-2008, 04:36 PM
"Radical self-reliance" could also mean respecting eveyman's right to be radically self-reliant, which would exclude going in to help others and would show their Katrina efforts to not fit at all perfectly well.

You're looking for an argument, Deb? :D

Radical self-reliance could mean different things, but in this particular case it means
Radical Self-reliance: Burning Man encourages the individual to discover, exercise and rely on his or her inner resources. (http://www.burningman.com/whatisburningman/about_burningman/principles.html)

By the way, do also note the gifting principle:
Gifting: Burning Man is devoted to acts of gift giving. The value of a gift is unconditional. Gifting does not contemplate a return or an exchange for something of equal value. as well as the rest of them.

Not to mention that respecting everyone's right (which does not imply an obligation) to be self-reliant certainly doesn't mean not helping anyone ever. All it would mean is that people have the right to refuse help if they don't want it.

Kaa

Kaa
05-15-2008, 04:37 PM
Some day we will all wish we could live like the Amish.

Nah, thank you, I'll pass.

But if you believe so, you may start right now.

Kaa

J. Dillon
05-15-2008, 04:38 PM
I wonder why they don't have wooden boats, and a motor?;)

Seriously I do admire them. Living close to the soil has got to be good for ones soul.

JD

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e397/wingsnsails/Passagemaker/33708653.jpg

boylesboats
05-15-2008, 04:42 PM
I wonder why they don't have wooden boats, and a motor?;)

Seriously I do admire them. Living close to the soil has got to be good for ones soul.

JD

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e397/wingsnsails/Passagemaker/33708653.jpg

Very odd ain't it?

John of Phoenix
05-15-2008, 06:01 PM
And I thought backing a boat trailer was difficult with a car.

Left Nelly, err right... more... MORE... LEFT LEFT LEFT!

TimH
05-15-2008, 06:14 PM
Nah, thank you, I'll pass.

But if you believe so, you may start right now.

Kaa

I thought about it briefly years ago. Much more wholesome and sustainable life style. Perhaps closer to the way things were meant to be?

TimH
05-15-2008, 06:18 PM
when I buy furniture again, if I dont build it myself it will be Amish. True craftsmanship. 99% of whats out there is pure junk.
Not only that but they cant rip you off, its against their beliefs. Greed is evil to them and they can only charge so much over cost.
Seems most of the problems ailing our society are greed related.

Concordia...41
05-15-2008, 08:52 PM
Some day we will all wish we could live like the Amish.


Yep. The grandparents were good folk. And again, these are just fleeting memories as we generally saw them once a year when we went to Nebraska for our summer holiday.

One of my favorite possessions is this rug my grandmother crocheted:

http://im1.shutterfly.com/procserv/47b8db34b3127ccec44ad5a1133200000056108BYtG7lsxbg9 vPhA

And if it looks like it's made out of bread sacks and trash bags.... well, it is :cool:

http://im1.shutterfly.com/procserv/47b8db34b3127ccec44a7641d22b00000056108BYtG7lsxbg9 vPhA

"Waste not, want not" does not even begin to describe ...

But it wasn't like they were hoarders, neither the farm nor the house in town where they lived in their later years was junky. They simply took care of things, saved the things that had potential value (like bread sacks :)) and reused them. I have a little table out in the garage that I can just tell my grandfather's work. There's a piece of a leg that broke where it joined the table. The broken piece shows signs of glue and when that didn't work a piece of pine (maybe a piece off an orange crate as I have a doll bed he made mother and her sisters from an orange crate), but when the glue and the pine wedge weren't up to the task, he applied several rounds of twine - quite the bit of marlinspiking for a Nebraska farmer.

Why? Because the materials were there and the table wobbled.

It is really so very simple and quite incredible.

Canoez
05-15-2008, 09:06 PM
I wonder why they don't have wooden boats, and a motor?;)

Seriously I do admire them. Living close to the soil has got to be good for ones soul.

JD

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e397/wingsnsails/Passagemaker/33708653.jpg

Ok, so where do they put the tiny horses in the boat motor? :confused:

David G
05-15-2008, 09:56 PM
I don't know Jack - my grandparents (mother's side) were Mennonite. Strict, harsh (maybe no-nonsense is a better description), frugal to a fault, and could cut you to the quick with a glance.

I'd take twenty physical beatings over the look of disappointment in my grandmother's glance. :( Stern folk, but I remember them being happy. Clean, neat, practical.


Of the two, the Amish are the stricter, and more conservative. The Amish split off from the Mennonites because they thought the M's were slackers. It is not uncommon for folks who are Amish, and decide the strictures are too rigorous, to switch to the Mennonite church. My ancestors were Mennonites who were apparently persecuted out of Switzerland in the 1600's (by the State religion - Catholicism). Some of my relatives still are Mennonite. As a kid, I thought they were pretty weird. Now, I'd have to agree that they are - in many ways - admirable and farsighted.

Saltiguy
05-15-2008, 10:13 PM
Mennonites are great wooden boatbuilders too. As I recall, the Lyman boats were built mostly by Mennonites, and even today, the SkiffcCraft boats are Mennonite built. Excellent craftsmen, hard honest workers.

paladin
05-15-2008, 10:48 PM
Some early oil derricks in Oklahoma after oil was found were constructed by Mennonite craftsman. When dad was working back in the oil fields just after WWII he would often bring 2-3 Mennonite gentlemen home for lunch or dinner.

huisjen
05-16-2008, 12:07 PM
Duck eggs are better.

Gary E
05-16-2008, 12:50 PM
For those who dont know, Lancaster County Pa is a large Amish area...


TROJAN BOATS AND THE TROJAN BOAT COMPANY - 1956-1992

For those of us who love our sleek wooden boats, especially the original Trojan boats, 1949 was a year to remember. It was four years after the end of World War II, with U.S. manufacturers still converting to peace-time uses of construction materials no longer needed for the war effort - steel, aluminum, rubber, nylon, and newer products such as plastic and vinyl. Novelties of 1949 included inflatable plastic boats, and a surfboard coated with fiberglass.
That year two young men tired of their jobs at Norman Owens’ Boat Company, and decided to leave to form their own company. Jim McQueen and Harper Hull traveled to Troy, New York, where they bought the Cottrell-Spoore Boatworks, a small builder of wooden racing boats and runabouts. McQueen and Hull renamed the company “The Trojan Boat Company” and moved operations to York, Pennsylvania. There they bought a dairy barn, converted it to factory use, and started to build boats in the heart of Pennsylvania Dutch Country where they had access to the local Amish work force, hard working and skilled craftsmen. Not long afterward they moved their main factory to nearby Lancaster.

More here..

http://www.trojanboats.net/TB%20History.htm

Mrleft8
05-16-2008, 01:07 PM
Ok, so where do they put the tiny horses in the boat motor? :confused:
If you look closely, you'll notice that that is a Johnson SEAHORSE outboard....;)