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ishmael
05-09-2008, 05:32 PM
I got a minor education poking on the web. Who here has flown them? A fine seat of the pants education in structure, motors, engineering and materials. You can't, so I gather, cover them in tissue, easily anymore.

Starting the motor, handing the plane off and running to the center, putting your hand on the handle. Great stuff. I was a bit disappointed that the ease of build has gotten so much easier. Now they snap together. We spent long hours over them, getting everything just right out of that balsa wood. It took skill.

paladin
05-09-2008, 05:51 PM
Balsa? My control line stuff was made from thin plywood....control line models don't fly, they stay airborne out of pure horsepower.....by comparison it would be like flying a Cessna 150 with a 1500 hp turbine engine....wings? we dunno need no friggin' wings....the prop will lift everything.....

Brian Palmer
05-09-2008, 06:50 PM
I saw some that could really fly a couple years ago. The pilot could make it do a four leaf clover.

Brian

Phillip Allen
05-09-2008, 06:59 PM
Balsa? My control line stuff was made from thin plywood....control line models don't fly, they stay airborne out of pure horsepower.....by comparison it would be like flying a Cessna 150 with a 1500 hp turbine engine....wings? we dunno need no friggin' wings....the prop will lift everything.....


like the old Thunderbolt :)

Torna
05-09-2008, 07:07 PM
Oh, the memories: A fox 35 on a Ringmaster. Flipping the prop with an already bloodied knuckle to start it. Balsa and doped tissue paper. The whole thing covered with a film of castor oil.
50-foot steel cable control lines; doing figures as a thunderstorm came over and feeling sparks jump from the cables to my hand (get this this down, now!).
I think that it's still in my parents' barn - broken of course. They're always broken in storage - you fix 'em, and fly 'em until you crash - then it's too late to fix them again, so they go back into the box in full tangle.
Oh the memories,
-leif

ishmael
05-09-2008, 07:11 PM
"control line models don't fly, they stay airborne out of pure horsepower."

Very true as far as you go. They do have wings! We only put ply in the bigger planes in stressed places.

I was making them when I first learned basic aerodynamics. The symetrical wing surfaces illustrate your point. We never got much above .049 Cox motors. Turning the plane upside down for long was a problem. The gas didn't feed more than a few moments in those engines when they were topsyturvy. A separate tank was the way to go if you were stunting. I got as far as outside loops and figure eights, but never a cloverleaf. The outside loops always killed those Cox motors unless you were really fast. No gas!

Wasn't it fun?

ishmael
05-09-2008, 07:24 PM
Oh, the memories: A fox 35 on a Ringmaster. Flipping the prop with an already bloodied knuckle to start it. Balsa and doped tissue paper. The whole thing covered with a film of castor oil.
50-foot steel cable control lines; doing figures as a thunderstorm came over and feeling sparks jump from the cables to my hand (get this this down, now!).
I think that it's still in my parents' barn - broken of course. They're always broken in storage - you fix 'em, and fly 'em until you crash - then it's too late to fix them again, so they go back into the box in full tangle.

------------------------------------------

That's it! We flew, mostly, in the back yard. Maybe an acre of open land sitting on the edge of the plains. Ohio. The thunderstorm was always there in the background those summers. I'm quite sure the neighbors were cursing under their breath. Those little two cycle motors are NOISY.

paladin
05-09-2008, 08:19 PM
Sure...but the most fun was the 6 foot "sailplane" free flights with an .020 engine.....kinda climbed really slow like to get altitude, engine died after 5 minutes, prop feathered, and you watched it sail out over the fields.....

J. Dillon
05-09-2008, 08:53 PM
I hope there no insect rights activist's here ?;)

JD

http://img151.imageshack.us/img151/7196/flypowersf6.jpg

The Bigfella
05-09-2008, 09:03 PM
Jack - that is absolutely brilliant. When the oil runs out we've got enough flies in Oz to power a whole fleet of 747s.

I've still got the piston from my Cox .049 on my car key ring. It measures about 8mm across the piston. I've still got radio controlled planes in the basement. A couple of electric powered and a straight slope glider. All "damaged" except the unfinished Eindecker 111

Noah
05-09-2008, 09:14 PM
I had one - flew it a few times before the motor gave up the ghost - still pretty darn fun. Seeing as though I'm 32, the body of the plane was plastic so it could take some pretty rough landings.

Gonzalo
05-09-2008, 11:22 PM
There was one year when all the kids on my street went nuts over the tethered models. My sixth grade year, I think, 1963-64. I had several because my father was into them, too. All mine were Cox .049 except one, an SE-5 with an .060 engine.

The one I flew the most was a PT-19 that was held together with rubber bands so it would break apart safely when landed hard. I also had a P-51B, very small, light, and fast.

I think they really did fly, too, because my first few times, I flew with the mixture turned off peak, so the power was low. It seemed like they would be easier for a novice to keep up with that way, and I suppose they were. I didn't know about stall speed, though, so I was lucky.

When my P-40 got beat up, we decided to take it off the tether and give it one last free flight. We started it out on the paved part of the school playground, cranked the engine, peaked the mixture and just let it go. It was beautiful. It took off like a real airplane, climbed and banked, and disappeared over the trees. We were dumb as stumps and didn't give a thought where it would come down. If it went through somebody's picture window, we never heard about it.

SchoonerRat
05-10-2008, 12:54 AM
I always preferred R/C gliders. We have a number of great spots locally, both slope and thermal. Used to fly reed sets way back. I think I preferred sailplanes for the same reason I became a rag-hauler instead of a stinkpotter. It always seemed to be more in harmony with Mother Nature riding the thermals, than beating her into submission with a big old engine.

Memphis Mike
05-10-2008, 01:18 AM
Belly Lint.

htom
05-10-2008, 01:34 AM
Oh yes, the summers of junior high school. Cox .049 Flying Tiger, plastic, was my first. Then the Pee Wee .020 and I was off into R/C for a while. After dark, if it was cloudy, we'd go over to Dave's and do experiments with his home-made x-ray machine or build rockets; if it was clear we went to Alan's and used his telescope.

Stunt-line kites are a lot like stunt-line planes, only not as smelly.

ishmael
05-10-2008, 06:48 AM
The plane I learned on was a little plastic job, styled after a Sabre jet IIRC. Ready right out of the box, with the .020 engine. All of it under the Cox name. It was small enough that we flew it in Paul's driveway. It had landing gear, so you could take off from and land it on the pavement.

The first plane I built, I was maybe ten, was a rubber band motored free flight. No symetrical wing surfaces there, LOL. Maybe a three foot wing span. That was fun! I never graduated to RC, though there was a guy who lived across the field who built a few and he'd take a couple of us to watch a club fly their planes on occasion.

The building was as much a part of the fun as the flying. Such delicate parts which when properly glued together, covered with tissue wetted then shrunk with a hair dryer and finally doped, made a remarkably strong wing. Running them into the ground on occasion was just part of the process. They were often repairable, but sometimes a total loss. Oops, time to build another plane!

The building of them was a great introduction to precision and structure. We usually built kits, but sometimes from plan and occasionally from scratch. I made a little combat plane for the .020 from the ground up one time. It flew pretty well. Painted it Red Baron red.

Great stuff. Thanks for the memories.

merlinron
05-10-2008, 09:58 PM
i flew the big ones also. and they do actually fly. most of the guys in my club had throttle control and the wings had flaps, linked to work opposite the tail surface..... do a loop, the tail wing's alerions go up and the wing flaps go down... tighter loop. the "nobler" kit was state of the art, then, might still be. some of the older builders had completely balsa covered planes with paintjobs that looked like they came out of chip foose's body shop!
i always liked watching the "combat" planes. little flying wings with super-tigre 40's on them. they would tie 3 feet of crape paper ribbon on the tail and set two guys loose in the same circle back to back, at take-off. first guy to loose all his ribbon was the looser..... most times he lost most of his plane as well! they were so fast and could change direction(flying inverted) so fast it was hard to keep watching them for more than a few seconds at a time. the most fun was to be let into the flyers circle and watch it from the flyers point of view! it was usually over in a few seconds of screaming total mayhem.

capt jake
05-10-2008, 10:39 PM
I used to fly a lot of them. .049 to the Fox 35. I had a lot of fun, those and model rockets too. :)

The fly thing made me think of taking a bee and putting it in the freezer. Folding a paper airplane out of a rolling paper and tying it to the leg of the bee with thread. Place bee and plane in the sun. You can see that paper plane in the air for quite a ways..... :D

paladin
05-10-2008, 11:07 PM
O.K....I got a problem.....with the flies and the paper match airplane.....When I was in high school I did a very short film, about 3 minutes total, and it was on the aerodynamics and flight of the common housefly.....They can't flap their wings and fly....when the land on the ceiling (overhead) they can't flap their wings and fly off...gots lots of very close up film.....
When a fly attaches itself to the ceiling (overhead) it flies up close to the ceiling, goes nose down to get a bit of speed, then zooms up and does a half roll and the sticky hairs on it's legs allows it to stick to the ceiling.
To fly away, the fly first detaches the two front legs to let the forward part of it's body angle down first, then releases the rear legs, falls to gain airspeed, then the wings have generated enough lift to fly.
Note that when a fly lands on the wall it will always turn down facing the floor, and use the legs to push itself away from the wall, flapping it's wings, and it has to fall an inch or so to get enough airspeed to start flying....
On a level surface......the fly takes off like a Harrier....It squats down, jumps into the air with the wings beating, the forward part of it's body then angles downward, and starts to fly forward. It will have to move a couple of inches to get enough forward manuevering speed...
Miss Biggers in Bugology gave me an A+ and she virtually never gave anyone and A.

The trick with the bee works, and it will with the fly, if......pull out a long human hair, your or the gal in front of you...make the airplane. A tiny drop of glue on the end of the hair and on the front of the airplane...take the bee or the horsefly out of the fridge, attach the other enf of the hair to the fly or bee with a tiny bit of glue....turn them loose....more fun if you have several, premade, keep them in a small bag with lotsa ice, release them in your favorite classroom.

coelacanth2
05-11-2008, 12:11 AM
I never could get those d@#$%%&*@ gas motors started. Loved rubber free flight, my dad and I made a big all balsa glider just before his big stroke - I was maybe 7. Kept it for years, it always was good for a hoot, as every brown thrasher in the vicinity would attack it as it spiraled in.
My son loves all this, and claims model rockets are good for those with short attention spans. Whoosh, whee, let's do it again:D

Tar Devil
05-11-2008, 01:09 AM
Oh gheez, if I could remember them all...

Started with a 1/2A Chipmunk
Ringmaster Jr (Fox 15 - that airplane got modified so many different ways...even flew it on floats)
Ringmaster Sr with a Fox 35
P-51 Mustang with Fox 36
Sig Super Chipmunk Fox 36
Profile P-51 with Fox 35
Cosmic Wind with Fox 25
Great Lakes, 1/2A

I now have plans for 1/2A Gee Bee Model Y and Gee Bee R2 (Fox 15). Might build 'em someday.

Except for 1/2As, I never used anything but Fox engines.

boylesboats
05-11-2008, 01:18 AM
I hope there no insect rights activist's here ?;)

JD

http://img151.imageshack.us/img151/7196/flypowersf6.jpg

ROTF :D :D :D
Somebody is having waaaaay tooooo much time on their hands....
I can believe that will work.. But I think that I have better things to do :D

John C. Gresham
05-11-2008, 01:20 AM
You can gather horseflies and make your very own spruce goose of matchsticks!

boylesboats
05-11-2008, 01:26 AM
I got a minor education poking on the web. Who here has flown them? A fine seat of the pants education in structure, motors, engineering and materials. You can't, so I gather, cover them in tissue, easily anymore.

Starting the motor, handing the plane off and running to the center, putting your hand on the handle. Great stuff. I was a bit disappointed that the ease of build has gotten so much easier. Now they snap together. We spent long hours over them, getting everything just right out of that balsa wood. It took skill.

Hi Ish,
Them are good old days....
I used to have lot of fun with them old Cox .049's... and cox planes..
Those planes are a joke half of time.. I just scrap out the engines, and gives away the planes, and buy those Guillows balsa models..
Man, those balsa model flies hellva lot better.. Dizzy all the time.. I flies them til they ran outta fuel, glide them in to land.. those plastic planes just drop like a brick.. I got tired of being dizzy, so I filled the tanks only half full..

epoxyboy
05-11-2008, 03:39 AM
I hope there no insect rights activist's here ?;)

JD

http://img151.imageshack.us/img151/7196/flypowersf6.jpg

ROFLMAO - I spent six months during my airforce career working in the "oxy bay" on RNZAF Ohakea. One of the party tricks was dipping flies in liquid oxygen (we had hundreds of litres of the stuff for A4 Skyhawks and Hercs). After a couple of minutes the serously deep frozen flies would take off, fly for maybe 30 seconds then drop dead in mid air. Very cool in a warped sort of way.
My control line peak was an OS Max35 in a stunt plane designed for something a tad smaller - it was almost vertical takeoff capable :-/ and almost completely uncontrollable.
Round and round and round and round and round and round wishing the f***ing thing would run out of gas before I pranged it!

Pete

Andrew Craig-Bennett
05-12-2008, 05:40 AM
Dunno about the Cox .49; English boys had Mills .75's:

http://www.modelenginenews.org/cardfile/m75.html

Mine acquired a water jacket after the third control line smash and ended its days in a powerboat.

WX
05-12-2008, 07:12 AM
I still have a number of 1950's aeromodeller magazine...wonder what they would be worth on ebay?

Dan McCosh
05-12-2008, 08:10 AM
Control line, free flight, indoor microfilm, R/C, gliders....

One day I built a nice, hand-launched competition glider. I went out to fly it, wound up and pitched it up into a thermal. It circled up, eventually disappearing, straight overhead, lost in the sky.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
05-12-2008, 08:51 AM
Well done!

(my glider became irretrievably entangled in a tree - a humiliating fate!);)

CarlZog
05-12-2008, 03:38 PM
I had one as a kid, and I remember it being a very frustrating experience. In retrospect, I suspect I was really just too young for it. My short lived flying career ended after I totally destroyed the plastic prop blades on a landing.

I have occasionally thought about it over the years, and considered buying another one to give it a try.... I'll add it to model rockets, model ship building, go-karts and all the other ill-fated childhood hobbies that I've considered a return to!

hokiefan
05-12-2008, 05:27 PM
Had a Cox PT-19, blue plastic, held together with rubber bands for when I crashed it. An early crash broke the fuel tank, that took a little thought to repair. A later crash fubar'd the whole thing. Built a number of rubber band powered balsa/tissue models, more fun to build than fly. The last one I built was a small 13" wingspan biplane that I built on my drawing board in college. (How many of you engineers used a drawing board in college? be careful, you're dating yourself).

Also got into Estes rockets, quite a blast. Built a 3-stager that would go ~500 feet with little engines. We put big engines in it and lit it off. Saw the third stage light off over 500 feet and screaming. Never found the top stage, didn't even see it eject. My favorite was a glider with the engine on a front pylon tractor style. Spent hours building & painting it, then more hours balancing it so it glided perfectly. Only thing I forgot was to add a little weight to one wing so it would glide in a circle. Lucky my test flight was with a little engine and it only glided as far as the top of the high school beside the ball field. My Dad managed to retrieve it for me. Added a straight pin to one wing, circled like a charm.

Fun times,

Bobby

John A. Campbell
05-12-2008, 07:07 PM
I built a combat wing with a Fox .35 Combat Special on it that was a wonderful plane to fly....had 70-foot cables to a U-Control handle. Also had a Johnson JBB (ball bearing .36 engine) that was plenty fast but my favorite was the Dooling .29 on a little Rat Racer.....this engine had rear rotary valve and loved lots of nitromethane in her fuel.......just fly the damned thing in a tight level circle round and round and it was just a blur.....the plane had an aluminum pan that was part of the fuselage and you drilled and tapped the cast-in mounting pads for the engine you planned to use. All of this was in the 1957 - 1960 time frame and in January 1958 I started blending model boats with model planes and finally phased out the planes altogether. Have been building model boats since January 1958. I have built all of the Octura kit boats and still have them and have also built several Dumas kit boats and started scratch building around 25 - 30 years ago.

Does anyone out there remember a big hobby shop in Los Angeles called "Colonel Bob's"? They were reportedly one of the biggest hobby shops in the country .....could always be counted on to have exactly what you needed and would ship the item(s) to you with the bill enclosed (no credit cards back then) .....they were really great people.......this was in the late '50's and early '60's.

Gee, it does me good to remember some of the things of my youth and also maybe good that I can't remember some of them !

Tar Devil
05-13-2008, 12:12 AM
Since folks keep mentioning rockets, here's my latest two.

Red one is made from an industrial sized aluminum foil paper roll. The engine mount is D engines but I built an adapter to use C engines as well. Haven't flown it yet.

The smaller one was made from a toilet paper roll. Flies fantastic.

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff298/TarDevil/Rocketsjpg-1.jpg

Nose cones on both ships were made by laminating triangular pieces of balsa then carving and sanding to shape. Fins are basswood. Parachutes are whatever plastic I can find around the house, usually garbage bags.

I've got another one going together made from a shipping tube with an E engine mount. Wife keeps saying something about "liability."

hokiefan
05-13-2008, 04:59 PM
I always dreamed of building a shoulder mounted model rocket launcher ala bazooka. Obviously, the projectiles would be single use, but it seemed like a fun idea to me. Anyone here try it that they will admit? What did you hit?:D

Cheers,

Bobby

Canoeyawl
05-13-2008, 11:37 PM
It says right on the package never to do that...
(I guess a small one will go about 7-800 ft horizontally ;))

Michael s/v Sannyasin
05-14-2008, 10:32 AM
I had a plastic P-51. To launch it, I'd put a brick in front of the outside stabilizer. After the engine was running, I'd run back, grab the handle and drag the plane back away from the brick. Worked most times.

Tried my hand at a bungee launched glider, uncontrolled, with a built in turn. The bungee release was a small fuse :-)