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hikingchrs
08-19-2004, 03:17 PM
I have just gotten my back issue of WB # 127
I would like to build the oars like Bob S. did,
how ever my boat calls for 8' oars and the plans are for 7' oars...can I just add 12" to loom or should I add some to the blade length also.
Thanks
Chris

Bob Cleek
08-19-2004, 09:06 PM
Suit yourself. You can add to the loom, or to the blade, or both. Adding to the blade will increase the strength needed to pull, of course. It's about balance really. The oar should pretty much find its center of gravity somewhere close to the oarlock.

Bob Cleek
08-19-2004, 09:10 PM
Suit yourself. You can add to the loom, or to the blade, or both. Adding to the blade will increase the strength needed to pull, of course. It's about balance really. The oar should pretty much find its center of gravity somewhere close to the oarlock.

Phil Young
08-20-2004, 12:31 AM
Think of it like gearing on a car. Long looms will give you a higher gear. The size of the blade is a bit like the amount of tread on your tires. On a light, easily driven boat you might want long looms, but you might not need a real big blade. Your flying along with very little resistance-half the battle is keeping up with the boat. On a stubby heavy workboat, maybe shorter looms, but a bigger blade to get some grip in the water. Dig in and pull hard.

ion barnes
08-20-2004, 01:17 AM
Been watching the Olympics, and some time ago on a PBS station, a history of Dory racing. Now I can appreciate both for the stamina, but dory racing is wild! The starts are most impressive the way the looms bend as the guys pull that first stroke an watch the dory lift out to the water. That just amazing! With it was organized here.

almeyer
08-20-2004, 07:16 AM
I don't remember the title of the book off hand, but R.D. Culler wrote a book about rowing some time back that has a pattern for 8' oars. The book is probably long out of print, but you can get it through interlibrary loan. I based my own first-attempt on his pattern. Although mine are not as nice as Bob's, they came out fairly decent for someone new to boatbuilding and rowing. Now if I could just learn how to row a little better. This idea about paddling while facing backwards is still a bit confusing.
Al
http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid118/p8af12697d0222c7c026f5ae9c69110c4/f882a2d1.jpg
http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid118/p7e8fbc67b8dfdaab753ef93ed62c7e88/f882a0af.jpg

Bruce Hooke
08-20-2004, 08:10 AM
The book Al is talking about is probably Boats, Oars, and Rowing and it is sadly long out of print and very pricy on the used market. As he noted you might be able to get it through your local library. WoodenBoat does also sell oar plans...

Nicholas Carey
08-20-2004, 04:36 PM
Originally posted by ion barnes:
Been watching the Olympics, and some time ago on a PBS station, a history of Dory racing. Now I can appreciate both for the stamina, but dory racing is wild! The starts are most impressive the way the looms bend as the guys pull that first stroke an watch the dory lift out to the water. That just amazing! With it was organized here.Have you ever seen pictures of the rowing races in Venice, Italy. Big burly guys racing what amount to hopped-up, ultralight ply gondolas with great long sweeps. I've seen pictures of them at the start — the sweeps look to have a couple of feet of bend in them.

Sailman58
08-20-2004, 04:42 PM
Aren't the blueprints for the Culler oars available at Mystic?

NormMessinger
08-20-2004, 04:42 PM
Bob? Is that you? How's everthing?