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View Full Version : How much foam for a PC??



David S
12-23-2002, 08:55 AM
Hi- This forum is extremely helpful to my questions. I am currently using 2 part foam to finish the onboard electronics to my boat. My question is how much floatation is needed for a PC and how to I epoxy it to the instrument panel? Thanks in advance.
http://www.g-news.ch/articles/nhp200nc/images/closeview.jpg

NormMessinger
12-23-2002, 10:31 AM
Whooooeeeeeeeee! That is a new one for The Forum, best I can recall. I've seen pour-in-place dissed as flotation materials but never mentioned as you are using it.

Now, if you don't mind me reverting to my airplane building days I'll observe that Pour-in-place (PIP) is very sticky stuff before it cures but the foam itself is not very strong. So, use PIP itself to bond your assembly to what ever but provide mechanical support as in build a box around it or what ever works with your design.

Now this advice, for what ever it is worth is going to cost you. Post pictures of the project and all will be forgiven.

Best.

--Norm

ken mcclure
12-23-2002, 11:20 AM
Is it April 1st already?

thechemist
12-23-2002, 12:19 PM
This is another one of those psychology students with their class project, trolling the internet.

This particular picture is someone's silly [gag]project from over a year ago. I saw it elsewhere........

thechemist
12-23-2002, 12:23 PM
Oh-by-the-way, the foam allows negligible heat to escape, and so the computer electronics will fry soon, if used much at all.

Enjoy your computer while it lasts, David.

[ 12-23-2002, 12:23 PM: Message edited by: thechemist ]

NormMessinger
12-23-2002, 01:12 PM
Heh heh heh....

He got me. I was trying to be so nice and helpful without being judgmental. Ha! Never again.

David, you devil.

--Norm

brad9798
12-23-2002, 01:20 PM
... just remember, now you will have to wonder whether the advice you get for real questions will be 'real' or a set-up that will cause disaster in your boat building ... ;)

ken mcclure
12-23-2002, 04:20 PM
Just don't tell him the trick about cross-cutting kerfs in his planking to get the planks to bend properly.