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Captain Pre-Capsize
08-17-2004, 08:13 PM
I recently read of using "Boat Soup" to treat the interior of a wooden boat rather than the epoxy/varnish combination. It is made up of linseed oil, resin varnish, and turpentine.

Advantages: no sanding, soaks into the wood, easy to reapply when needed, will not crack like varnish.

Disadvantages: Dosn't look as good as a glossy varnish but rather looks very seamanlike, needs to be renewed annually.

He goes on to say that you apply two to three coats to begin with to establish a base coat. This takes a week when you allow for drying time. After that it is spot used as necessary.

It seems to me a WHOLE lot easier than the burden of sanding, epoxying, sanding, varnishing and so on. Does anyone have any experience with this? Your thoughts?

Hughman
08-17-2004, 10:35 PM
Well, you're missing the secret ingredient.

Dave Fleming
08-17-2004, 10:46 PM
Aw'g'wan Hugh, tell him.

Wayne Jeffers
08-17-2004, 10:48 PM
You forgot the pine tar. ;) :D

Wayne

Dave Fleming
08-17-2004, 10:56 PM
You forgot the pine tar.Spoil Sport!!!

insert big grin here

Todd Bradshaw
08-17-2004, 11:20 PM
Given the option, I'd rather use Deks Olje #1. No pine tar color, but really nice stuff to work with. It doesn't darken like linseed oil mixes, doesn't get dark brown goo on you like some pine tar mixes can and dries rapidly so it won't still be sticky two weeks later as can sometimes happen with home-brews.

ChuckG
08-17-2004, 11:38 PM
I use boat soup all the time, and I love it. Use the pine tar just for coloring, with equal parts turps and boiled linseed oil... and add a dash of jap drier. A light coat once a day for a week, once a week for a month, once a month for a year, and yearly thereafter. (Actually, that's a little much, but it's easy to remember smile.gif )

And yeah, it takes a while to dry, but whadayawant for cheap?

-cg

paladin
08-18-2004, 01:09 AM
The only paint on Tana Mari (interior) izz the overhead.....and I must admit the rest is satin varnish.....but hey fellows it really izzint that much upkeep and really looks nice.....

Hughman
08-18-2004, 08:45 AM
Originally posted by Dave Fleming:
Aw'g'wan Hugh, tell him.Oh, all right.

There's pine tar, the locally available brand is Bickfords (http://tackoutlet.com/store/discount_saddles/product_436_Pine_Tar.html), which is used in horse care, and then there is Stockholm tar, which is a by-product from the charcoal making process.

Boat soup benefits from a little japan drier, as well.

Noah
08-18-2004, 09:33 AM
For the interior? Why?

It's dawning on me we are talking about an open boat now...which may make sense.

If you are talking about interiors of a cabin I would go with Varnish. It looks good, and with no sunlight lasts for ever.

Paul Pless
08-18-2004, 09:58 AM
Some time back there was a topic about men's cologne and pine tar. If your looking for this scent, I discovered it at my sister's health food store. Its Burt's Bees Aftershave Balm. Its got beeswax and some kind of pine product at well as pure grain alcohol in it. Burt prides himself on selling products that are so safe that they are all edible.

Sorry for the hijack, but I thought you should know

Bob Smalser
08-18-2004, 10:06 AM
Originally posted by Hughman:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by Dave Fleming:
Aw'g'wan Hugh, tell him.Oh, all right.

...pine tar, the locally available brand is Bickfords (http://tackoutlet.com/store/discount_saddles/product_436_Pine_Tar.html), which is used in horse care, and then there is Stockholm tar...

...a little japan drier, as well.</font>[/QUOTE]...and if you never intend to paint it, add some beeswax for additional body. (And a dollop of Orange Oil for even more olfactory pleasure, if that turns you on...the only advantage I see to expensive Stockholm Tar is that it smells better than farrier's tar used to dress hooves.)

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3389779/41589748.jpg

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3389779/41589308.jpg[/qb][/QUOTE][/QB][/QUOTE]

[ 08-18-2004, 11:16 AM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]

Dave Fleming
08-18-2004, 11:08 AM
Ahem,,,

Stockholm Tar (http://www.maritime.org/conf/conf-kaye-tar.htm)

No charcoal that I can see.

Murray Campbell
08-18-2004, 02:46 PM
thumbs up for the boat soup, and a second vote for adding some japanese drier...maybe don't have the white slacks crowd over for a while

But i really really hope you're talking about an open boat because i can't imagine a more noxious slop to have belowdecks...smells great above, on a fresh sea-breeze though

Hughman
08-18-2004, 09:17 PM
Originally posted by Dave Fleming:
Ahem,,,

Stockholm Tar (http://www.maritime.org/conf/conf-kaye-tar.htm)

No charcoal that I can see.:confused: :confused: Read it again.


Genuine Pine Tar 588

General: A dark colored, old fashion type of pine tar obtained as a byproduct through destructive distillation of pine wood in the manufacture of charcoal. Thinned with turpentine to a standard viscosity.

Dave Fleming
08-18-2004, 09:28 PM
OOCH OUCH YIKES as I scurry to my cave with tail firmly tucked between my legs.

Mea Culpia Mea Culpia

I stand corrected.

But, I think I would like Pine Tar 773 on my vanilla ice cream, thank you.

insert winky grin here

[ 08-18-2004, 10:32 PM: Message edited by: Dave Fleming ]

skuthorp
08-18-2004, 09:53 PM
I use the captains recipie to soak my home-made hardwood blocks in. I remember pine tar from wooden XC skis years ago and dont care if I NEVER come across it again!!
:eek:

Wiley Baggins
08-18-2004, 10:55 PM
Originally posted by Bob Smalser:
...and if you never intend to paint it, add some beeswax for additional body.Bob Smalser,

Can you please expand on this for the coating chemistry challenged? I've mixed up and used boat soup, but never with beeswax (actually, I've not used beeswax in any application) . What benefits does the beeswax provide. Also, when you say "additional body," are you talking about viscosity, or building the finish, or...

Thanks

Edited to correct a typo immortalized in Bob Smalser's reply.

[ 09-16-2004, 04:20 PM: Message edited by: Wiley Baggins ]

Bob Smalser
08-19-2004, 12:19 AM
Can you please expand on this for the coating chemistry challeged? I've mixed up and used boat soup, but never with beeswax (actually, I've not used beeswax in any application) . What benefits does the beeswax provide. Also, when you say "additional body," are you talking about viscosity, or building the finish, or...
No shortage of all manner of woodwork out there with a couple coats of glorified, pigmented linseed or tung oil product followed by paste wax. Minwax and Johnsons, for example.

Warm look, satiny feel, pleasant smell, easily applied and maintained, thicker layer of protection than oil alone. Downright housewife friendly.

All I'm doing by mixing some beeswax into my hot oil is saving a step and getting (arguably) better penetration.

The downside is that linseed turns black in UV...that can be avoided by using tung in the soup instead, but tung costs severalfold as much.

But like Mr Smith and CPES, there is an inexpensive, little-known exterior linseed/orange oil/wax product out there used by timber framers called "Landark"....and I can attest from watching framers use it for three years that it is the cat's meow of exterior oil finishes....when I get the chance again, I'll play with it on boats:

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3019409/36930471.jpg

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3019409/36929391.jpg

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3019409/36929015.jpg

Those DF logs have two coats of Landark and have been totally exposed for two years....the roof timbers have one fresh coat.


Landark....All natural penetrating oil finish for logs, timbers, floors (803)279-4116....S.C.


[ 08-19-2004, 01:32 AM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]

Wiley Baggins
09-16-2004, 03:24 PM
Originally posted by Bob Smalser:

The downside is that linseed turns black in UV...that can be avoided by using tung in the soup instead, but tung costs severalfold as much.

...there is an inexpensive, little-known exterior linseed/orange oil/wax product out there used by timber framers called "Landark"....and I can attest from watching framers use it for three years that it is the cat's meow of exterior oil finishes....I lost track of this thread.

So replacing linseed oil with tung oil will make the finish colorfast, for want of a better term. Good to know. I'll give that and the Landark a try sometime.

Thanks

Harry Miller
09-16-2004, 03:47 PM
Wiley, is that what we're going to use?

Hughman
09-16-2004, 09:20 PM
Originally posted by Bob Smalser:
[QB][QUOTE]
The downside is that linseed turns black in UV...that can be avoided by using tung in the soup instead, but tung costs severalfold as much.

]I think the discoloration from linseed oil is bacterial/fungal activity. Maybe algae. It is a vegetable oil, after all.

A fungacide from the paint store would probably prevent this.

Wiley Baggins
09-22-2004, 11:49 PM
Originally posted by Harry Miller:
Wiley, is that what we're going to use?Harry,

I was thinking about something more along these lines (http://media5.hypernet.com/ubb/ultimatebb.php?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=010210). ;)