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jclays
01-07-2008, 11:30 AM
New to the board. Glad to be on. I have a 1966 Californian power boat. Glass and wood. In its past somebody had the boat painted . I have since found the rear exterior portion of the cabin to be mahogany under the paint. I would like to restore the wood look in this part of the boats exterior. The interior of the boat is Philippine Mahogany. I have found some soft spots that i have injected penetrating epoxy and it has hardened up quite well. Can I sand the paint and apply a mahogany veneer to this portion and protect it with a varnish finish? If so. Does it matter if the veneer is paper backed or not? If it matters the boat is in Southern California.
Thanks
Jim

paladin
01-07-2008, 11:45 AM
In 1966 the mahogany, Philippine Mahogany is not the same stuff as sold as Philippine Mahogany today. In 1966 it was a wood known as Tanguille, which is as close to a true mahogany that you could get, the stuff sold as Philippine mahogany today is a poor grade tropical cedar.

jclays
01-07-2008, 10:20 PM
Understood regarding the Philippine mahogany. There is Honduran and African avalible. My question still is. Is applying a veneer to the rear exterior of the cabin and protecting it with marine varnish a good option to restoring the wood look on the cabin. I would not be able to refinish the mahogany that has been painted over with white Awlgrip hence applying a veneer face to return the look it once had.thanksJim

paladin
01-07-2008, 10:45 PM
You could sand off the paint and apply the veneer with epoxy, then finish the veneer with a thin epoxy coat then the varnish of your choice,

jclays
01-07-2008, 11:23 PM
Thanks..Paper backed veneer or non paper backed? What type of epoxy. Im familiar with penatrating epoxy.thanks

Todd Bradshaw
01-07-2008, 11:59 PM
Non paper-backed. I'd probably not go thinner than 1/16"-3/32" to avoid curling during application and to allow for some clean-up sanding without going through the veneer. Sliced veneer looks better than peeled veneer if you can find it. Use regular boatbuilding epoxy like WEST, Raka, Maas or System3 and hold your veneer down tight to the surface with staples while the epoxy cures. If you can find one, a small staple gun like the Bostitch T11 Tackler works great for this and shoots staples with are nearly as small in terms of leg diameter as office staples. The holes from these pretty much disappear during finishing. If you can't find one, use any regular gun but position the staple legs so that they cut slots with the grain, rather than against it. The holes will show less that way. Once it's all cured, sand the surface smooth. If desired, you can stain it with alcohol or water-based stains. Then seal it with four to six thin, rolled-on coats of epoxy, sand that smooth and finally varnish it with a quality marine varnish that has good UV filters in it. If you do a good job, it ends up looking like this.
http://webpages.charter.net/tbradshaw/Sail%20photos/star.jpg

David G
01-08-2008, 12:08 AM
Todd - I'm curious why you say non paper backed. I was thinking that also... if he was gonna use any glue but epoxy. With the epoxy, I'm thinking that the paper would soak up some resin, making it a thicker composite, and a stronger joint. Or, are you worried about the factory bond between the paper & the veneer? Or??

"There are nights when the wolves are silent, and only the moon howls" -- George Carlin

Todd Bradshaw
01-08-2008, 03:06 AM
The chances are very, very good that the glue holding the paper to the veneer is nowhere near as good as the epoxy you will be using. You don't even have the luxury of knowing for sure what type of glue it is, but you can be pretty certain that they didn't have boat laminating in mind when they made it. The bond of the veneer to the boat is only as good as the weakest layer involved and you can't expect the resin to magically displace all the glue that's holding the paper onto the veneer. This means that in some places the paper/veneer glue bond might just become structural. To do a job like this isn't horribly difficult, but it's a fair amount of labor and money. Why toss a big unknown into the mix when basically all you need to do is glue wood to wood?

Hwyl
01-08-2008, 04:53 AM
There's a great article on doing this in the latest "Good old boat" the author uses vacuum bagging to do it. Todd's method looks much easier and gave him spectacular results.

Tylerdurden
01-08-2008, 08:27 AM
Having done a bunch of vacuum bagging I would say the Good Ol boat article is right on. I kind of thought the wood veneer on a glass boat a bit tacky though. Like a Dodge Aspen wagon with wood veneer.http://www.woodenboatvb.com/vbulletin/upload/images/icons/icon12.gif

JimConlin
01-08-2008, 09:58 AM
Having done a bunch of vacuum bagging I would say the Good Ol boat article is right on. I kind of thought the wood veneer on a glass boat a bit tacky though. Like a Dodge Aspen wagon with wood veneer.http://www.woodenboatvb.com/vbulletin/upload/images/icons/icon12.gif
I had one of those Aspens, or was it a Volare?.
That wasn't skinny fake wood on its flanks, it was genuine vinyl. Nobody was fooled.

jclays
01-08-2008, 10:35 AM
Does the painted cabin surface that I will be applying the veneer to have to be sanded to the bare wood (all paint off) or to just create a smooth surface with some tooth to it.

kc8pql
01-08-2008, 12:11 PM
Does the painted cabin surface that I will be applying the veneer to have to be sanded to the bare wood (all paint off)

I would. Otherwise the adhesion will only be as good as the paint to the wood. Unless you can find some unusually thick veneer somewhere, or can saw your own, I think you're on your way to a bubbly mess. I wouldn't even think about doing this with standard thickness veneer unless you can vacuum bag it. Even then 1/28" or less veneer is probably not going to last long.

jclays
04-21-2008, 07:53 PM
Weather is now very good. I will start sanding the cockpit and the painted rear exterior surface of my cabin that I plan to restore the once Mahogany look. My hardwood supplier has both Honduran and Sepeli (dont know if I spelled that right) the latter has the better grain appearance. Is there a better species between the 2?? Both species are nice fairly thick aprox 3/32 of an inch. I will be covering a 4ft by 3ft and a 4ft by 2ft area. I was also told by the hardwood supplier to use west systems epoxie thickened with silica and troweled on. Any thoughts??? I will then apply several coats of epoxy sand and finish with a nice amber varnish.
All input will be concidered and appreciated
Thanks
Jim

The Bigfella
04-21-2008, 08:42 PM
Photos would help...

I would suggest that the only reason to use a veneer would be cost - but the biggest cost here is your labor. By the time you add it all up it may only be a hundred or two different to use solid timber to do the repair.

If you have some rot in the structure btw I'm willing to bet there is plenty more that you cant see. Again .... photos....

Lew Barrett
04-21-2008, 09:02 PM
I agree with Ian. Depending on the size and scope of your boat, this could be a very a big job. Don't doubt that for a second. People who say "it's only cosmetics" have no idea how daunting a big interior can become, not that you're receiving that sort of advice by anyone here. If you want to do it properly and without failures plaguing you in the future, it's important to determine a good methodology from the start.


Interior restoration is, to me, one of the hardest parts of the restoration regimen. As you have to strip the boat anyway, think carefully before you cover solid wood with veneer. That's a pretty Draconian approach if the underlying solid wood is in good condition apart from some paint issues. And remember, veneer will never match solid for durability and ease of repair. You're going to have to do it all anyway. There are very few shortcuts in this game.

jclays
04-21-2008, 10:49 PM
This is the exterior rear wall on each side of the companion way.I would have to remove the helm station and all controls as well as the whole rear side. It would be a major ordeal to replace it. I am doing the veneer soley to restore the original mahogany look. Structurally I can fill in the dry rot and re-paint but I am trying to bring back the original look that was painted over.

The Bigfella
04-22-2008, 02:19 AM
I've rebuilt the whole cabin and deck on my boat for reasons along the lines of the problem you have described. No way would a veneer have worked.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
04-22-2008, 03:29 AM
.... Structurally I can fill in the dry rot and re-paint ....


What, exactly, do you mean by "fill"?

jclays
04-22-2008, 08:44 AM
There are some hollow pockets in the first layers of the exterior cabin plywood created by the dry rot that I have saturated with penetrating epoxy and are now solid. I will open up these pockets and fill with West Systems epoxy and some 403 micro fibers for filler, sand and cover with veneer for apearance. The area of dry rot are 2 pockets aprox 3inches by 6inches and 2 inches by 3 inches all on the rear exterior first 3 layers of the cabin wall.

The Bigfella
04-22-2008, 08:48 AM
Far easier to put in a Dutchman using solid timber. Cut back until you are sure the rot is gone.

Doing that is much easier than getting a good result with veneer.

My son and I veneered a subwoofer box - and did it without a vacuum system. It was OK in the boot (trunk) of a car - but it it had been out in the open, every little ripple would have been obvious - and ripples there were! The epoxy bled through the veneer unevenly too - again, OK in the car, but out in the open?

Hwoodworks
04-22-2008, 09:22 AM
A Dutchman if it is what I think it is a great idea. Is it a piece of wood with both ends rounded off. Then the hole would have round ends to match. This is most easily achieved by drilling holes at the end of the cut
Have done this in many applications but didn’t know what it was called.
If that isn’t what it is well (never mind). I would like to know what it is because I need all the help I can get.

jclays
04-22-2008, 09:39 AM
I think this thread is starting to lose the original intent. I know how I will repair the dry rot. Im not having any concerns on that portion of the project. I would really like to restore the appearance of the original Mahogany on this portion of the cabin. It has been painted over with white Awlgrip by its previous owner (aprox 10yrs) and I really dont think that I will be able to sand it all off and get that Varnished mahogany back. This is a vertical exterior surface.

Lew Barrett
04-22-2008, 09:46 AM
A Dutchman is the piece fitted into an excavation that's made where some rot or damage has been cut out of an otherwise good piece. You cut out the rot or damage, square up the corners and level the hole, and fit a matching piece of wood into the piece. Think of this as a big inlay. This process and the piece that's fitted goes by a couple of different names; graving piece, Dutchman, inlay; whatever. Done properly it's a legitimate repair that can visually disappear, or leave small enough joins that it reflects positively on your craftsmanship.
Few old boats survive without at least a couple of them somewhere.

I think what you're discovering is the dichotomy between those who believe a veneering solution (sorry...I thought this was on the interior...exterior makes it more difficult) is a piece of cake and those
who see wood replacement in your future.

Hwoodworks
04-22-2008, 10:42 AM
We use paperback veneer to stop glue bleed through, or a veneer that structure will not hold it self to together when being moved. I don't think it is for exterior. Good luck

jclays
04-22-2008, 10:53 AM
Ive used a paper backed oak veneer previously on a bathroom vanity attached with weldwood contact cement and sealed with 6 coats of Deft. Still good in a wet steamy bathroom with 3 boys 15yrs and still nice. I know its not the outside marine environment.

Todd Bradshaw
04-22-2008, 11:34 AM
I might suggest a "softer" filler than microfibers. Though very strong, they are pretty difficult to sand flush and flat because the filled area will be much harder and more abrasion resistant than the surrounding mahogany. This tends to leave a rounded hump, surrounded by dished wood. If you really think you need the fibers in there for strength it might be wise to see if you can leave them just a bit shy of the surface and then top-coat your fill area with a thin layer of epoxy mixed with a microballoon-based filler (407?) that will sand down flush.

jclays
04-22-2008, 02:24 PM
Thanks..That sounds very good. Ive talked with the local wood working shop (Rockler) and explained what I had, they in turn referred me to 2 wood veneer/plywood suppliers. All concurred that since I had a marine mahogany plywood cabin bulkhead with paint damaged face surface adding a face of new mahogany veneer (non paper backed) was really no different than what plywood was. Since it was a vertical surface where clamping was not an option a solvent based contact adhesive should be used. I was told that applying epoxy to seal prior to varnishing could compromise the glue bond due to bleed thru. I should allow the glue to completly dry and start sealing with a reduced varnish first coat aprox 40% followed by subsequent varnish coats with less reduction as I build the finish....Seems to be a plan..

Todd Bradshaw
04-22-2008, 09:39 PM
That statement (or actually pretty much the whole group of them) doesn't make much sense or give me much faith in the folks you talked to at the woodworking shop. Adding a new veneer to an old plywood panel is very, very different from "what plywood is". If it's done with contact cement, it's difficult to even call it a lamination and since plywood is made with hard glue under tons of pressure it's not really even close to being the same sort of thing. The only glue that will both truly seal the old plywood and bond the new veneer on is epoxy resin. It needs minimal clamping pressure and staples will work fine and pretty much disappear into the grain if you pick them carefully.

Even if I intended to use contact cement, I'd seal the old plywood with epoxy first (2-3 thin coats rolled and tipped) let it harden and sand it smooth to no finer than about 80 grit. Contact cement will not seal plywood well enough to bury it under something that prevents you from being able to get at it.

If you do decide to use contact cement, It might be a good idea to use one that is adequate for marine applications - and this generally means one of the ones used for rubber rafts and inflatable sport-boats (including bonding the inflatable tubes to their plywood transoms). Go to the Northwest River Supplies website (nrsweb.com) and browse through the adhesives in the repair section. Shore Cement or the Clifton Hypalon adhesive would be good choices. West Marine also carries a good Hypalon cement that would work. Avoid anything labeled for PVC or vinyl as they work as much by solvent-melting the vinyl materials together as by glueing them. In more domestic stuff, Goodyear Pliobond is probably the best contact cement you might find in your local stores and has a history of surviving in wet places (it used to be commonly used when splicing leaders for fly fishing). It stinks like hell for a very long time, as do most of the solvent-based contact cements and I wouldn't be the least bit surprised to see them attack your varnish if you don't give it enough time to out-gas the solvent fumes before varnishing.

I'm not at all sure I'd want to be inside a boat for long with that smell and it can take it a long time to go away- something to consider. I'd be tempted to use water-based contact cement over epoxy-sealed plywood instead. I've used the stuff for recovering guitar amps and though it doesn't stick quite as well as the solvent-based glues, it's actually quite pleasant to work with and has almost no smell. I haven't dunked any of my amps in the lake, but if the ply was properly sealed, the veneer glued on and then well varnished on top, I suspect it might work fine.

Lew Barrett
04-23-2008, 12:12 AM
Todd, much as I respect your skills and craftsmanship, I disagree. Varnish will easily let water pass. No problem. It shrinks and cracks out rapidly. If it didn't, nothing varnished would ever leak. It is a poor plan to rely on varnish to maintain water tight integrity for long. Oh that it would be the solution! Make pretty and make sound all in one step! But I am glad to see you are moving, a step at a time, towards the "rethink this" side of the line:D

Todd Bradshaw
04-23-2008, 01:54 AM
Lew, I'm just looking at all the possible options without much concrete idea of how well they would work or what kind of conditions will exist on the interior of a boat that I've never seen? Since conditions inside various boats can range from pretty decent with good vents to a swamp with everything but the lilly pads and frogs, he'll have to make his own decisions.

My best case scenario hasn't changed since January. The only way that I would do this on my own boat is to fix the ply and then apply the veneer with epoxy and staples, stain it if desired with alcohol-based stain, overcoat it with about six rolled and tipped coats of WEST 105/207, sand it smooth as a baby's butt and varnish it. Anything less would leave me wondering how long it was gonna' last and that bugs the living crap out of me.

The Bigfella
04-23-2008, 01:57 AM
Since conditions inside various boats can range from pretty decent with good vents to a swamp with everything but the lilly pads and frogs, he'll have to make his own decisions.



This isn't inside his boat. Its on the outside.

Lew Barrett
04-23-2008, 09:58 AM
Lew, I'm just looking at all the possible options without much concrete idea of how well they would work or what kind of conditions will exist on the interior of a boat that I've never seen? Since conditions inside various boats can range from pretty decent with good vents to a swamp with everything but the lilly pads and frogs, he'll have to make his own decisions.


Nothing succeeds like success, and you've had your full share Todd. You'll get no further arguments from me.;)

jclays
04-23-2008, 10:37 AM
This project has no structural properties involved. It would be easy to just patch and paint and all would be good. I am just trying to restore the wood look the boat once had in this portion of her cabin exterior. I will be glueing a face veneer on to exsisting mahogany plywood that was once varnished but now painted over. The contact adhesive is solvent based and also water proof. It is an exterior surface so fumes and ventelation is not an issue. I will be applying Behr clear spar varnish over the veneer for protection building until I have at least 6 to 10 coats starting with a 40% reduction on the first coat and reducing less with each subsequent coat. I think this will work.

Todd Bradshaw
04-23-2008, 10:51 AM
Bigfella - Yeah, you're right. That's what I get for not rereading the entire post carefully when it popped back up. In that case, it makes the very idea of trying to do the job with any kind of contact cement combined with varnish absolutely nuts - which would be plainly obvious not too long after the job was finished. Epoxy finished off with a good UV varnish is likely the only thing that's going to survive for long. It might also be well worth having a Sunbrella cover over the area, or the whole boat if the boat sits outside for any extended periods. It will drastically increase the intervals between the need for recoating the varnish to renew the UV blockers.

kc8pql
04-23-2008, 11:27 AM
Bigfella - .....the very idea of trying to do the job with any kind of contact cement combined with varnish absolutely nuts - which would be plainly obvious not too long after the job was finished.

I agree completely. I've tried to stay out of it this time around but, just so he can't say he wasn't warned, and for the benefit of others who may read this thread in the future I'll chime in one last time. Many here already know I've made my living for a long time now building custom cabinets and furniture. A good bit of that has involved veneering. Using contact cement to stick single ply wood veneer is the least satisfactory and least durable method you could choose. It doesn't even hold up in a house. Outside it will check and then bubble. Todd's method is the only way I'd attempt veneering an exterior surface. It also should be noted that, of everyone contributing to this thread, he's the only one to have actually veneered a boat, quite successfully too, from what I've seen.

jclays
04-23-2008, 04:40 PM
Thanks to everyone for the input its helping me put together a plan.When glueing with epoxy should it be thickened with anything? Silica, wood flour? After the bonding of the veneer. Sealing with epoxy. I have some Smith's penetrating epoxy. Would I seal with this? Is this a different form of epoxy as the West systems epoxy?
Thanks

The Bigfella
04-23-2008, 07:38 PM
When glueing with epoxy should it be thickened with anything? Silica, wood flour?

Yes - use the product recommended by the epoxy maker. I use West system epoxy and their various fillers. To do this job (which I wouldn't, but you seem to want to) I'd have a reasonably runny mix. You'll need to ensure its spread evenly (good luck) given you cant vacuum bag your veneer.

After the bonding of the veneer. Sealing with epoxy. I have some Smith's penetrating epoxy. Would I seal with this? Is it UV stabilised? West have a specific hardener for use under varnish, IIRC its 207. Check Smith's website to see if they recommend it for that use - if not - don't use it

Is this a different form of epoxy as the West systems epoxy? Yes



...

Todd Bradshaw
04-23-2008, 09:16 PM
Your surfaces should be quite flat and smooth if you have properly prepared them, so there should be little need for much filler in the resin. I tossed in a little bit of WEST 403 microfibers to add a little more gap-filling ability, but not much at all. Resin is applied to both surfaces (the boat and the veneer) and then you stick them together and start tacking down the veneer. You need to work fairly quickly and a certain amount will bleed-out at the joints as you staple it down, plus you're likely to get fingerprints, a few stray drips, etc. on the top surface. If the resin contains a lot of filler, it won't be clear and these things will show. Don't forget to wear gloves - you'll need them.

The success or failure of your project is likely going to be based on the amount that your veneer curls - which varies a lot due to veneer thickness, type (rotary-peeled or sliced) and the wood used. I was lucky in that I had 3/32" sliced veneer that a friend made for me. It was very stable and not at all prone to curling in the time period I needed to apply it. Thin, peeled, furniture-grade veneer might have been a different story. You might be wise to do a small practice piece on scrap plywood before going after the boat with the stuff. If you can't get it to lay down nicely on scrap, it won't work on the boat either. It will also give you an idea of how many staples it takes to hold it down tight to the surface. Be very critical about the results as any bloops or bubbles on the real boat will be very hard to fix.

Once it is attached and cured, you can sand it carefully to get rid of any drips, etc. on the surface. Obviously, the thicker the veneer, the more you can sand without cutting through it. Mine was thick enough that I could sand it all down to clean bare wood, removing all the drips. This was critical because I was going to stain it before coating and needed to get all the epoxy off of (or out of) the outside surface for an even staining job. Had it been thin enough for me to worry about sanding through, I would have probably skipped the idea of staining it, epoxy-coated it (right over the drips) until I had enough coating to sand without going through and then sanded it all flat.

The so-called "penetrating" sealers (or should that be penetrating "sealers") are made of a little bit of epoxy and a whole bunch of solvent which evaporates out. They have their uses, but are not suitable for (or helpful for) this job. You need the sealing and adhesive power of 100% solids, epoxy resin with no evaporating solvents added. Find one from WEST, System-3, Mas, Raka, etc. that's made specifically for clear finished boats and practice a bit with it to get used to measuring it, mixing and applying it, pot-life working time, etc. before doing the boat. A test panel that's maybe 2'x2'-3' or so might give you good practice with both the resin and working with the veneer. After the boat's done, you can always make a matching table out of it.....

Sealing over the top of the veneer is done with straight epoxy - no fillers. How many coats to apply depends on the resin's viscosity and your application technique. You want enough thickness to be able to sand it fairly heavily to get it nice and smooth and still leave a couple coats worth of thickness on the wood. This would probably mean applying four to six coats to start with.

Once sanded, it's time for a good UV filtering varnish. You can certainly dilute the varnish with some thinner if you're having problems with how it handles, but over epoxy resin, the thinning probably won't do much. The reason varnish is often thinned for the first couple coats on bare wood is because it can sometimes allow it to penetrate and stick/seal better. This does not happen when varnish is applied over epoxy. It just sits on top of the resin and all you're doing is creating thinner layers of varnish and needing to apply more of them to yield the same result. As long as my varnish is going on smoothly and giving me enough time to get it spread out the way I want it to be, I use it straight out of the can.

woodboat
04-28-2008, 11:23 AM
Hi jclays, have appreciated reading this thread and the various responses. In case you have not noted our similar interest, here is the thread. Aside from the transom work planned, I will also be installing paper backed veneer (because it is what I have on hand) on several vertical surfaces on the cabin that stretch from the forward portion of the cabin to the stern. ...

http://www.woodenboat.com/forum/showthread.php?t=77060&highlight=woodboat

jclays
04-28-2008, 11:42 PM
Woodboat
Thank you for sharing your thread. Seems that we have similar types of projects. Thank you to everyone who has responded to my proposal strange to some as it may be. I ve taken all inputs into consideration. upon closer inspection under the paint I have found some bunged screw holes running horizontally in rows across the mahogany ply that I was looking to veneer over. I will remove several rows and see what the support system is and the possibility of removing a whole rear panel at a time and using it as a template to cut out a new panel from 3/4 inch mahogany ply.
Thanks again
more to come
Jim
Tight lines and calm seas

jclays
05-22-2008, 05:06 PM
Bear with me on reviving this thread. Removed the mahogany plugs covering screws on these cabin panels that I was intending on recovering with mahogany veneers. The panels can be removed. I am going to replace them verses veneering them. Philipine mahogany not being availible anymore I am limited to Teak plywood or sapele plywood. The finish will be multiple coats of Captains amber marine varnish (love that amber tone on mahogany) usually teak is not varnished from my experience and Im not too familiar with Sapele. I also have been reading about cpes prior to varnishing. My experience is to thin the first coat 30 to 50% then gradually reduce the amount of thinning until ive built up 6 to 10 coats with the last 2 coats weather premitting unthinned. Naturally sanding with 400/600 wet/dry in between coats. Plywood 100 to 150 a sheet. Thoughts from you guys??
Thanks
Jim

Mrleft8
05-23-2008, 06:48 AM
Bear with me on reviving this thread. Removed the mahogany plugs covering screws on these cabin panels that I was intending on recovering with mahogany veneers. The panels can be removed. I am going to replace them verses veneering them. Philipine mahogany not being availible anymore I am limited to Teak plywood or sapele plywood. The finish will be multiple coats of Captains amber marine varnish (love that amber tone on mahogany) usually teak is not varnished from my experience and Im not too familiar with Sapele. I also have been reading about cpes prior to varnishing. My experience is to thin the first coat 30 to 50% then gradually reduce the amount of thinning until ive built up 6 to 10 coats with the last 2 coats weather premitting unthinned. Naturally sanding with 400/600 wet/dry in between coats. Plywood 100 to 150 a sheet. Thoughts from you guys??
Thanks
Jim
Sapele tends to be a little bit redder than Honduras Mahogany, but otherwise is quite similar.

jclays
09-24-2008, 09:45 AM
Got the new Sapele panels cut and the first 2 coats of varnish applied. Looks great so far. The Sapele panels are the exterior walls of the cabin. I applied 2 coats prior to installation so as not to leave the Sapele panels without any protection on them since the boat lives on the water. Lots of dew this time of the year. The installation will take 2 days before I can continue varnishing. The only bummer is that the Sapele is sooo much darker red/brown than the exsisting cabin door which is a lighter golden color.

Scott Rosen
09-24-2008, 04:03 PM
I just found this thread, and I'm glad to see you decided to replace the panels. The veneer concept had me worried. In fact, I thought it was insane to use veneer over a formerly painted plywood surface on the exterior of a boat.