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Bill Perkins
12-09-2007, 05:52 PM
I was in Lowes shopping for a new disposal recently (so many interesting stories begin this way ) and on a whim picked up a copy of Fine Homebuilding at the checkout counter . The January issue has instructions for making ones own Multi Master saw blades .

Basically you buy a Japanese hand saw, place it in a vise and cut slices off with a angle grinder mounting a cutoff blade . A couple of holes are drilled in each piece for mounting on the MultiMaster ( with a drill press) yielding blades with coarse and fine tooth edges . These don't have the offset of the store bought blades so you still need some of those .

JimConlin
12-09-2007, 07:37 PM
Other solutions:

Find the Fein stand at a show, preferably at a crowded time. Yammer loudly at the salesman complaining "Why do your %&*$# blades cost over fifty bucks each?!!! etc." My experience is that he'll offer to sell you a couple at $20 to get you to go away.

The blades used on Stryker cast cutters will fit with a little reaming. They cost about $10 each. They are not as hard as the HSS Fein blades, so they're not useful for glass or carbon composites. They're OK for wood and maybe nonferrous metals.

Bob Smalser
12-10-2007, 12:05 AM
A tin snips and a hammer will shear them easier than a diamond cutoff wheel, but good luck drilling those hard saw blades without spot annealing, which will distort them. I suggest cobalt bits and a Drill Doctor to resharpen after every couple holes. ;)

Bill Perkins
12-10-2007, 10:22 AM
I don't know Bob . I've never tried drilling holes in my saw, but I'm hopeing the editors check on the feasability of the "tips&techniques" that they publish .

StevenBauer
12-10-2007, 10:37 AM
I bet those Bad Dog Bits they sell at the WBShow would drill right through those blades. Too bad I can't afford them. Have you seen them, Bob? Carbaloid, I think. The things they were drilling through at the show were just amazing.


Steven

Canoez
12-10-2007, 10:49 AM
I bet those Bad Dog Bits they sell at the WBShow would drill right through those blades. Too bad I can't afford them. Have you seen them, Bob? Carbaloid, I think. The things they were drilling through at the show were just amazing.


Steven

OT, but what's Carbaloid? I know what carbide is and PCD, but Carbaloid?:confused:

StevenBauer
12-10-2007, 11:04 AM
Here's the site z: www.baddogtools.com/index.php (http://www.baddogtools.com/index.php)

The demos were amazing. They'd drill through a 1" SS plate, then a block of granite, then another SS plate. :eek:

Steven

Tom Lathrop
12-10-2007, 01:38 PM
I don't know Bob . I've never tried drilling holes in my saw, but I'm hopeing the editors check on the feasability of the "tips&techniques" that they publish .

I have used old Japanese Dozuki saw blades as flexible scrapers for many years. I found that they could be broken in pieces and then grind the edges. Never had an particular problem drilling a hanging hole in them with regular bits.

Completely agree that the saw blades for the multi tool are unreasonably high priced.

Canoez
12-10-2007, 01:42 PM
The "Z"-saw replacement Dozuki blades sold by Woodcraft are only hard at the teeth, anyway - if you can get the hole started on the surface, I wouldn't think drilling is a big deal.

Bob Smalser
12-10-2007, 02:00 PM
If you can drill through the blade with a HSS jobber bit, then go for it.

On blades you can't, cobalt jobber bits are inexpensive and effective, but the harder the steel, the more often they require resharpening, some blades requiring a fresh bit for each hole.