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Syed
11-13-2007, 07:53 PM
Harvard Law School to award sacked chief justice


LAHORE: Harvard Law School would award the ‘Medal of Freedom’ to former chief justice of Pakistan Iftikhar Muhammad Chaudhry for his role in promoting human rights and justice, Geo News reported.

The channel reported that the ‘Medal of Freedom’ is Harvard Law School’s highest award and it is awarded to people for their services to the cause of justice and human rights. It said the school’s student union nominates people for this award and this time the students picked Justice Iftikhar Muhammad Chaudhry. Former South African president Nelson Mandela is one of the past recipients of the award.

paladin
11-13-2007, 10:40 PM
Congratulations are in order......

skuthorp
11-13-2007, 11:29 PM
Likewise Syed.

PeterSibley
11-13-2007, 11:56 PM
Thank you Syed for your updates .

Syed
11-14-2007, 08:32 AM
Thank you paladin, skuthorp and PeterSibley.

Mr. Musharraf is on one end and other extreme is Mr. Chaudhary. So it is enough to prove us Pakistanis as extremists.:cool:

Bruce Taylor
11-14-2007, 08:51 AM
A brave and righteous man.

http://www.supremecourt.gov.pk/photo/iftikhar.jpg

John of Phoenix
11-14-2007, 11:32 AM
Mr. Musharraf is on one end and other extreme is Mr. Chaudhary. So it is enough to prove us Pakistanis as extremists.:cool:

:D Very good. :D

Ian McColgin
11-14-2007, 11:50 AM
Mr Chaudhary and the lawyers - the major force for change in Pakistan. It's eeriely like the great lawyers of our revolution such as Adams, really a conservative force for orderly change.

Lew Barrett
11-14-2007, 12:48 PM
Bravo.

Osborne Russell
11-14-2007, 03:55 PM
Seems like the idea of the rule of law (not men) has taken strong roots in Pakistan, and produced a crowd of lawyers willing to go out in the street and get their faces bashed by the government.

How did this come about and how can we do it here?

At the risk of provoking controversy, I suggest as a partial explanation the nature of Islam, which insists that there is a "higher law" to which the laws of man are subordinate. Same basic concept as "endowed by their creator with unalienable rights" although sharing the basic concept doesn't lead to the same results, disclaimer disclaimer disclaimer.

Islamic philosophical influence, and how about those British? Did something they planted in Pakistan grow with particular vigor? Was it a result of deliberate policy? I doubt it. But there it is. Lawyers in the streets, man.

How about indigenous experience? Village councils? Trial by jury?

I would expect that the same considerations impel everybody toward liberal democracy, all times, all places; and the evidence will be a failed attempt here, a successful one there; bits of progress, bits of set-back; still, a trend. Doesn't mean the outcome is guaranteed. Consider America, I rest my case.