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View Full Version : DHS prevents tourists from entering USA



seanz
11-03-2007, 02:02 PM
Tourists are easy to identify if you know what to look for and will even declare their intentions on their visa..........

http://www.theage.com.au/news/national/overseas-visitors-give-america-a-miss-costing-it-100bn/2007/11/02/1193619143022.html


THE number of foreign visitors to the United States has plummeted since the September 11, 2001, attacks on New York and Washington because foreigners don't feel welcome, tourism professionals have complained.
"Since September 11, 2001, the United States has experienced a 17 per cent decline in overseas travel, costing America $US94 billion ($A103.2 billion) in lost visitor spending, nearly 200,000 jobs and $US16 billion ($A17.5 billion) in lost tax revenue," the Discover America advocacy campaign said in a statement.
Chairman Stevan Porter lamented the "extraordinary decline" in the number of overseas visitors to the US, while the group's executive director, Geoff Freeman, blamed the slump on the shabby welcome many foreigners feel they get in the US.
"It's clear what's keeping people away in the post-9/11 environment: it is the perception around the world that travellers aren't welcome," Mr Freeman said.


I'm think this story has been posted before, maybe it's one of those 'media annuals'.
Course, it could be argued that the 17% that no longer visit were not tourists at all and a genuine threat so the system is working. :rolleyes:

ishmael
11-03-2007, 06:53 PM
If you look at a map of Maine we share a long border with Canada. There's always been a "border, what border?" attitude along it. Just recently I took the long way through the states to Michigan rather than the shorter road through Canada. Used to be all you needed to cross was two forms of ID, but now you need a birth certificate, and soon it will be a passport. I couldn't put my finger on my birth certificate, and I don't have a current passport.

A shame. It's going to cut into cross border trade, and harm a long standing friendship. Visits to Maine by Canadians, despite the weak American dollar, are off by half compared to year ago. It's just too much work to get through the border crossings.

It's a strange, difficult balance, but the move toward needing identity papers bothers me. Look at that border! You think bad guys wanting to cross are going to find a forger to make passable ID, or are they just going to walk, drive or sail across?

seanz
11-03-2007, 08:44 PM
There is also (for furners) an issue with visas.
All of Nth America is a US immigration zone (well Duh I hear you say :D) sooo if you're are doing the big trip Mexico, Canada, USA your time outside the US in Canada or Mexico counts as time in the US so no nipping across the border and then renewing your visa.
Coupled with the US immigration policy of 'jail first ask questions later' many people may see a long trip to the US as too risky.

LeeG
11-04-2007, 05:57 AM
hasn't the decline of the dollar made travel to the US more affordable?

tattooed john
11-04-2007, 06:17 AM
I thought the terrible coffee was driving tourists away.

George.
11-04-2007, 07:02 AM
I know people who used to go to the US once a year just to go shopping, and come back with suitcases bulging. Now they go to Europe, because to get a US visitor visa you must:

1) Pay a US$ 100 fee payable only at a US bank in the city where there is a US consulate - if you are one of the 160 million Brazilians who don't live near that bank, you have to do a costly and time-consuming wire transfer.

2) Come in for an interview - again, that means air travel or at least hours of driving for most people. And when you get there you get line up at 4 AM and hope you don't have to come back tomorrow.

3) If you don't get your visa you don't get your money back, either the $100 fee or your interview travel expenses.

4) The whole process is taking at least three months nowadays, often longer. Meanwhile, you can't make final travel plans.

I can understand being rigid with people trying to come in overland, or for the first time. But even people who have long held multiple year visas, been to America multiple times, spent lots of money, and never overstay, have to go through this.

Phillip Allen
11-04-2007, 07:48 AM
I wonder George...is the beginning of a North Korea kind of isolation in the hazy future?

Peter Malcolm Jardine
11-04-2007, 11:37 PM
Most Canadians don't really want to be detained, strip searched, sent to Gitmo, or tortured in Syria...:D

Paul G.
11-05-2007, 05:00 AM
The message is clear,

We dont trust you, go away, play somewhere else.

Guess what? we will obey you (with pleasure) :D

Pericles
11-05-2007, 05:47 AM
It's surprising to learn that so many US citizens do not have passports or that failing to obtain a copy of a birth certificate prior to a trip to Canada is not considered poor planning.:eek:

The vast majority of Brits have passports (unfortunately EU ones) in order to travel to exotic climes, meet interesting people and kill them! It's what British Armed Forces (and our football fans) like to do when given the opportunity, according to the War Nerd.

http://new.exile.ru/articles/list.php?IBLOCK_ID=35&SECTION_ID=156

However, there are few places in the USA where 23 miles of water separates a boat owner from people who speak a foreign language, so unless a voyage is planned to Mexico and other points south, the travelling bug can be satisfied within US national borders. Otherwise it's this.

http://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f57/

Pericles

Phillip Allen
11-05-2007, 05:54 AM
I'm about to find out what has changed...gonna apply for a new passport. the last one expired in 2000

ishmael
11-05-2007, 07:57 AM
"It's surprising to learn that so many US citizens do not have passports or that failing to obtain a copy of a birth certificate prior to a trip to Canada is not considered poor planning."

My brother died, it happened quickly, so there wasn't much time for planning. I've got my original birth certificate around here somewhere, and have been meaning to renew my passport, but I don't travel to Canada or abroad very often, so neither have been priorities.

Pericles
11-05-2007, 12:18 PM
Ishmael,

Sorry to hear that.

Pericles

Greg P H
11-05-2007, 12:32 PM
One of the most disturbing things (to me) are the attempts to make us have passports in order to LEAVE the US.... permission to leave? WTF?

I've lost track of where it stands at the moment.

Last time I visited OZ, it took about 5mins online to get a visa...

Phillip Allen
11-05-2007, 02:41 PM
One of the most disturbing things (to me) are the attempts to make us have passports in order to LEAVE the US.... permission to leave? WTF?

I've lost track of where it stands at the moment.

Last time I visited OZ, it took about 5mins online to get a visa...


I have the same alarming concerns!

George.
11-05-2007, 03:33 PM
I just left Brazil and came back, all with a driver's license. Flew to the US without ever taking my shoes off. :D

Phillip Allen
11-05-2007, 03:40 PM
Well George, that does suggest the whole thing is a show for the voters doesn't it?

George.
11-06-2007, 05:10 AM
Of course it is. Notice that what is becoming scarce is legitimate tourists. Do you see any dent in the illegal alien population? ;)

tattooed john
11-06-2007, 05:33 AM
Like i said. **** coffee.