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David McCollum
06-14-2005, 02:02 PM
What do you lubricate bronze screws with when fastening planks to oak frames? In high school shop class I was taught to use Ivory soap on wood screws. I have never read what boatbuilders use.

Dave Fleming
06-14-2005, 02:15 PM
Beeswax and Pine Tar mix

Melt a 1lb of Beeswax in a double boiler or better yet a coffee can set in a pot of water add a good dollop of Pine Tar mix well and remove from heat.
When cool cut off coffee can and saw slices from the resulting cylinder of the mixture.

Or collect a bunch of tuna cans and when the mix is melted pour into tuna cans, leave about a 1/2 inch space. When cool invert can and hit smartly with a block of wood. Wax should come out easily.
Keep in can for ease of carrying. When needed swipe screw threads across wax and insert in bored hole and tighten up.
Any extra wax that comes out as you are tightening up the screw can be removed with tip of pen knife. I use an old 3 cornered extra slim file with a fine tip ground on end for this.
Haven't had a glued plug not take over the cleaned up counterbore. Whereas soap, I'm thinkin', might contaminate the counterbored hole and prevent a good glueup.

Don Bailey
06-14-2005, 02:21 PM
Hi Dave, Jamestown Distributers sell Lloyd's Akempucky Fastener Lubricant for about 3.00. I have also used straight beeswax. Don B.

Bruce Hooke
06-14-2005, 02:57 PM
I generally use either straight beeswax or Akempucky. As I recall, WoodenBoat did a test of the various common choices a few years back and Akempucky won in terms of effectiveness. As I recall, soap is not recommended because it attracts and retains water -- not really an issue for stuff in a house but less good on boats. I may have the reason wrong but I know there was some reason why soap was not good.

Wayne Jeffers
06-14-2005, 03:06 PM
I think soap also has some corrosive effect.

For quite a while, I've kept a cheap wax toilet bowl ring on my workbench for lubricating screws. Nice soft wax, it sticks to screw threads better than hard wax.

Wayne

Chris Setzler
06-14-2005, 03:55 PM
I second Wayne's suggestion. Was a furniture maker for 35 years and the wax toilet seal ring is the best screw lubricant I've ever used by far.

Chris

[ 06-14-2005, 04:57 PM: Message edited by: Chris Setzler ]

Howard Sharp
06-14-2005, 07:31 PM
Slickseam.

Bob Cleek
06-14-2005, 07:39 PM
I've heard tell K-Y Jelly is the best screw lube around!

ssor
06-14-2005, 08:15 PM
Beeswax will accept shellac coatings and if you force the excess wax into the screw heads then later when the time comes to pull the screw you may dig wax rather than glue out of the screw slot.

Del Lansing
06-14-2005, 08:28 PM
base & potty humor. Well this reminded me of something I saw just the other day. A fella needed to run up a lot of screws and he was holding what appeared to be a screw-cactus; upon closer enquiry it ends up he was using about 1/3 a ring of a potty base beeswax ring, screws all stuck in about 1/2 way. I would guess from their stickiness they have the turps built in and they are available at _any_hardware store, for what $2?

petey
06-15-2005, 06:11 AM
Originally posted by Dave Fleming:
Beeswax and Pine Tar mix

Melt a 1lb of Beeswax in a double boiler or better yet a coffee can set in a pot of water add a good dollop of Pine Tar mix well and remove from heat.
When cool cut off coffee can and saw slices from the resulting cylinder of the mixture.

Or collect a bunch of tuna cans and when the mix is melted pour into tuna cans, leave about a 1/2 inch space. When cool invert can and hit smartly with a block of wood. Wax should come out easily.
Keep in can for ease of carrying. When needed swipe screw threads across wax and insert in bored hole and tighten up.
Any extra wax that comes out as you are tightening up the screw can be removed with tip of pen knife. I use an old 3 cornered extra slim file with a fine tip ground on end for this.
Haven't had a glued plug not take over the cleaned up counterbore. Whereas soap, I'm thinkin', might contaminate the counterbored hole and prevent a good glueup.

petey
06-15-2005, 06:12 AM
What does the pine tar do and where do you get it?

Dave Fleming
06-15-2005, 10:16 AM
What does the pine tar do and where do you get it? Pine Tar can be obtained from Veterinary Supply houses.
To me a bit of Pine Tar added to the beeswax makes it a bit less crumbly and helps in adhering to the screw threads whilst driving.

And it smells good too! ;)

PS: I am not sure the toilet bowl rings are still made out of wax. Last one I handled was a bit slippery and quite soft to the touch.

Gary E
06-15-2005, 10:42 AM
Pine Tar can be obtained from Veterinary ..... What really is this stuff ?

What would a Vet use it for?

Dave Fleming
06-15-2005, 11:23 AM
Maritime Pine Tar Usage (http://www.maritime.org/conf/conf-kaye-tar.htm)

Vets use it to treat hoof splits and in ahem, certain surgical removals.

Concordia..41
06-15-2005, 11:47 AM
OW! :eek:

ssor
06-15-2005, 11:52 AM
Jamestown Dist. still sells pine tar. I like to blend pine tar and beeswax and pour it on a new roll of nylon twine and heat it in the oven at about 200 degrees f. for an hour or so. It soaks right through to the core and makes the string into marline.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
06-15-2005, 11:53 AM
Another lubricant use of pine tar is on the threads of galvanised shackles - something I picked up from Pete Culler's books.

I will make myself some of Dave's magic lubricant.

Bob Perkins
06-15-2005, 02:43 PM
We used the $1.99 toilet ring at WoodenBoat School. I do now too.. Sometimes, simpler is better smile.gif

Take Care,
Bob

Bayboat
06-16-2005, 03:32 PM
Mr. Cleek, you have to be careful with your advice. I tried K-Y and the screws got so slick they popped right out.

Although Dave's mixture does work well and it sure smells nice, I prefer the toilet bowl ring for handiness and it's cheaper. It's still sold as wax.

American Rope & Tar (www.tarsmell.com) has genuine Stockholm tar.

[ 06-16-2005, 04:41 PM: Message edited by: Bayboat ]

Noah
06-16-2005, 04:00 PM
In the article about the guy building the 8-meter, he said he used a tiny dab of 5200 as lube and it worked great. I'm not sure I would use 52, but maybe 4200, and it would keep water from migrating up the screw threads.

Others dip them in redlead paint, or so I have been told.

Noah

nutmeg2go
06-16-2005, 04:59 PM
A very disappointing thread to read. Such an opportunity for sick or off color humor. I'm not so sure about this toilet bowl wax, however. Down east we usually use a johnny brush and cleanser.

Bob Cleek
06-16-2005, 08:26 PM
Golly, Donn... get your mind out of the gutter! All I said was that I'd heard K-Y Jelly was the best screw lube around. The poster was asking what was the best screw lube, wasn't he? Now, I've never used the stuff, but I've seen pictures of the box and it says right on it that it is water soluable and safe for use on sensitive human parts. It would seem that this would work well for screws because it wouldn't corrode the threads and would wash away when the boat got wet. However, given Bayboat's first hand experience (ahem... I hear another objection coming...), perhaps, unlike pine tar, it's better left for the use intended. I still think, though, that it is good slippins for any tight fit. How else do they get a six inch tube of the stuff in a four inch box?

By the way, you don't have to go to a vet supply house for pine tar. Any saddle shop or feed store will have it... assuming you have saddle shops and feed stores in your neighborhood!

Tom Robb
06-17-2005, 03:08 PM
If you use a wax toilet ring it may be best to get a new one :D