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View Full Version : The summer of love(or where were you in 1967?)



ishmael
06-04-2007, 08:04 AM
I can't let this fortieth anniversary just pass.

I was graduating from grade school to high school. If I'd been just a little older I probably would have run away from home and been there. It's an easy time to either romanticize or denigrate. A new, a different spirit, broke through. Fueled hugely by LSD. The common histories shown on the toob, while not completely ignoring this aspect, don't give it enough credence.

The war, which had become terribly unpopular, was raging in SE Asia. The king, Johnson, was abdicating, and the kids were eating LSD, changing their minds. Or so it looked at the time.

stevebaby
06-04-2007, 08:08 AM
I can't let this fortieth anniversary just pass.

I was graduating from grade school to high school. If I'd been just a little older I probably would have run away from home and been there. It's an easy time to either romanticize or denigrate. A new, a different spirit, broke through. Fueled hugely by LSD. The common histories shown on the toob, while not completely ignoring this aspect, don't give it enough credence.

The war, which had become terribly unpopular, was raging in SE Asia. The king, Johnson, was abdicating, and the kids were eating LSD, changing their minds. Or so it looked at the time.I was in my first year of High School and just about to embark on a long career of leering at pretty females.

Brian Palmer
06-04-2007, 08:18 AM
Kindergarten.

JimD
06-04-2007, 08:22 AM
Canada was 100 years old in 1967. We went on a school trip to the World's Fair in Montreal.

Popeye
06-04-2007, 08:23 AM
1967 .. had a girlfriend , madonna , james tried to entice her over the fence one day but i had the best homemade popsicles

Vince Brennan
06-04-2007, 08:24 AM
Gee, the "Summer of Love"... lemme see...

Learning that "Thai Stick" wasn't an injection by the Docs for VD, that mud could totally F.U. the action of an M-16, that the short scythian bow was a very effective weapon in bush areas as long as it didn't delaminate from the humidity, that the proprietors of Air America really weren't crazy... they were feckin' certifiable, finding you can lose six pounds in a day just from sweating and that military nurses everywhere all looked like my Aunt Phoebe, that NCO's were usually more interested in the contents of the bar than the contents of your pack, that most of those young and innocent looking girls weren't, and that we really should'a listened to Eisenhower. (Hindsight IS 20/20!)

"Summer of Love", my ass.

ishmael
06-04-2007, 08:29 AM
"When the truth is found to be lies And all the joy within you dies. Don't you want somebody to love Don't you need somebody to love Wouldn't you love somebody to love? You'd better find somebody to love."

Jefferson Airplane

ccmanuals
06-04-2007, 08:33 AM
Graduating from HS in upstate New York. Growing my hair even longer. Groovin on Sgt Pepper.

Popeye
06-04-2007, 08:34 AM
turn your heartache right into joy
she's a girl, and you're a boy
so get it together, make it nice
you ain't gonna need, any more advice

stephen stills

Andrew Craig-Bennett
06-04-2007, 08:39 AM
I was 14 3/4. Nuff said...

Keith Wilson
06-04-2007, 08:53 AM
I was 11, living in New Jersey, and wondering what all the fuss was about. Sometimes I'm glad I wasn't old enough to be a real hippie - might have done myself damage. As it was, I was a bit too young and only got in on the tail end of it.

There's really excellent song by a Spanish singer-songwriter named Ismael Serrano about (among other things) the more political European counterpart: the occupation of the Sorbonne and the events of the summer of 1968. It captures very well the time when justice and revolution and girls in miniskirts seemed all part of the same thing. Song lyrics are almost impossible to translate, but this sort of gets it.

http://www.ismaelserrano.com/canciones/letras/papacuentameotravez.htm


Papá Cuéntame Otra Vez
Ismael Serrano

Dad, tell me once more that beautiful story
about gendarmes and fascists, and students with bangs,
and sweet urban guerrilla war in bell-bottoms,
and Rolling Stones' songs, and girls in miniskirts.

Dad tell me once more about all the fun you had
spoiling the old age of rusty dictators (1),
and how you sang Al Vent (2) and occupied La Sorbonne (3)
in that French May (4) in the days of wine and roses.

Dad tell me once more that beautiful story
about that crazy guerrilla who they killed in Bolivia (5),
and whose rifle no one dared to take up again,
and how from that day on everything seems uglier.

Dad tell me once more how after so many barricades
and so many clinched fists and so much spilled blood,
In the end you couldn't do anything,
and below the cobblestones there wasn't any beach sand.

That defeat was hard: all that was dreamt
rotted in the corners and was covered by spider webs,
and nobody sings Al Vent anymore, no more madmen, no more pariahs,
but it still has to rain, the plaza is still dirty.

That May is long gone, long gone is Saint Denis,
long gone is Jean Paul Sartre, long gone that Paris,
sometimes I think it didn't make any difference after all though:
those who speak too much still get whacked.

And the same putrid dead are still there.
Those who now die in Bosnia died then in Vietnam.
Those who now die in Bosnia died then in Vietnam.
Those who now die in Bosnia died then in Vietnam.

(1) Francisco Franco
(2) Al Vent: a 1970s protest song from Spain
(3) La Sorbonne: the university of La Sorbonne in France
(4) May 1968
(5) Che Guevara


It prompted me to find an old recording of Al Vent. It's a really good song in Catalan, just the sort of thing for protesters to link arms and sing as the police start whacking on people.

But it all was a very long time ago . . .

Andrew Craig-Bennett
06-04-2007, 10:13 AM
Oh, I do. I was 16 3/4 in 1969!

ishmael
06-04-2007, 10:16 AM
Fred,

I don't have a 'thing' about LSD. I know its power, and a whole lot of kids circa 1967 were eating it regularly. I don't think you can understand what was happening then without looking at it. That's all.

P.S. The first widespread use of the drug in America was in CIA experiments on college kids circa 1962. That's how Ken Kesey got his ramp up for his Merry Pranksters. The government finally figured that this maybe wasn't such a good idea, and put a clamp on it about five years later.

P.P.S. The CIA was looking for drugs to control minds was the reason they ran those experiments. Little did they know! LOL.

Bruce Hooke
06-04-2007, 10:20 AM
I was 16
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
months old...

Dan McCosh
06-04-2007, 10:34 AM
Watching the city burn.

geeman
06-04-2007, 10:38 AM
I was busy working 7 nights a week in the band.I didnt have time to mess around with mind altering drugs or booze.My opinion is that the kids that were NOT doing all the drugs and marching for something or other far out numbered the ones that were getting all the attention and press.
Thats just my opinion.

katey
06-04-2007, 10:39 AM
In utero.

ahp
06-04-2007, 10:40 AM
I was crawling around under the Navada desert helping to set up a nuclear weapons test. I seem to recall that we won the Cold War. That was a good thing. I just hope that W doesn't reignite it.

Bob Adams
06-04-2007, 10:45 AM
Gee, the "Summer of Love"... lemme see...

Learning that "Thai Stick" wasn't an injection by the Docs for VD, that mud could totally F.U. the action of an M-16, that the short scythian bow was a very effective weapon in bush areas as long as it didn't delaminate from the humidity, that the proprietors of Air America really weren't crazy... they were feckin' certifiable, finding you can lose six pounds in a day just from sweating and that military nurses everywhere all looked like my Aunt Phoebe, that NCO's were usually more interested in the contents of the bar than the contents of your pack, that most of those young and innocent looking girls weren't, and that we really should'a listened to Eisenhower. (Hindsight IS 20/20!)

"Summer of Love", my ass.


Thank you Vince.

Gary Bergman
06-04-2007, 10:48 AM
Was there, did that, don't remember much.....

Lance F. Gunderson
06-04-2007, 10:52 AM
I was doing a bit of winter camping in the Alps along the Chec/German border as an E4 with the Fourth Armored Division, Patten's old unit. The Summer Of Love seemed very far away.

John Hastie
06-04-2007, 11:06 AM
Vietnam, spreading love...

Bob Cleek
06-04-2007, 11:07 AM
In college.... and in the Haight... amazing times. I guess we didn't change the world like we thought we were doing.

geeman
06-04-2007, 11:10 AM
After all, showing news clips of the many kids just going to class and doing their homework,making good grades and simply getting an education, doesnt make good news clips.Its not news, but showing kids getting into hot water or doing something illegal is news.
So who do you think gets all the press?
Its still true today BTW.

ishmael
06-04-2007, 11:29 AM
fred,

I'm neither advocating nor denying the influence of that drug. But to ignore its influence is silly. The wild-eyed, the visionaries of the Haight had all dropped it at least once, and most were eating it weekly. So did Charlie Manson, for that matter.


So, there you are, madmen and angels. A wild time.

Peace, brother. "War is not healthy for children and other living things."

John of Phoenix
06-04-2007, 11:30 AM
In college.... and in the Haight... amazing times. I guess we didn't change the world like we thought we were doing.
I don't know. It just took some time.

Summer of '67 - I'd just graduated from HS in New Mexico and drove to my home town in Manitoba with my best friend to celebrate the Centennial. We had to get all kinds of papers from the draft board and, despite the documents, the Canadian immigration guys were pretty leery of my buddy but we got in - only to find that he couldn't get work without a visa. We spent a month chasing girls and drinking beer ‘til the money ran out then headed home to college.

Neither of us ever got around to drugs though pot was popular. We used to cut ROTC on Firday afternoons, drive 60 miles to Juarez for dime shots of tequila and nickle tacos. When you've got that, who needs drugs?

Nanoose
06-04-2007, 11:34 AM
Picking strawberries and raspberries....

Sailman58
06-04-2007, 12:29 PM
Learning how to make steel in the Bethlehem Steel Loop Course. That outfit went belly up, and I have transformed myself from a Metallurgist to a computer programmer.

Ron

Popeye
06-04-2007, 12:33 PM
i think it rained all morning and then it cleared up in the afternoon

botebum
06-04-2007, 12:40 PM
Hmmm...1967? I was making butter in preschool and flashing my unappreciative babysitter on Saturday nights.:rolleyes:

Doug

TomF
06-04-2007, 12:48 PM
I was 5.

I do recall my sister going off to Expo '67, and interminable playings of the tacky Centennial song somebody in the Federal government commissioned.

Caaaaa...Naaaa.....Daaa....
(1 little 2 little 3 Canadians)
Weeeeee looovve theeeeeeee....:D

Popeye
06-04-2007, 12:53 PM
wasn't it about then they came up with the maple leaf flag?

i seem to recall a stylized union jack or coat of arms or something before then

TomF
06-04-2007, 12:55 PM
ooooohhh! Good one Popeye!

Let's see if anyone still has a bee in his bonnet about ditching the Red Ensign for the Maple Leaf.

Popeye
06-04-2007, 12:59 PM
stars and stripes .. yah

hammer and sickle .. yah yah
..

leaf .. woo hoo

stumpbumper
06-04-2007, 01:02 PM
Had completed sophomore year in college, majoring in draft-evasion. Also played in a band (didn't everybody?) all through college - the King's Jewels. Had a Gibson ES335 TD, Fender Stratocaster, and Selmer Mark VI Tenor Sax. Started out with British Rock but branched out into other things with Sax, Trumpet and Trombone added. Things like BS&T or mild R&B music.
I was raised by Roosevelt Democrats, and like them I was the last to admit the Vietnam war was a mistake. I was drafted in '69 immediately after graduation. I served my two years as the war was at it's height, but stayed stateside the whole time.

Bruce Hooke
06-04-2007, 01:09 PM
After all, showing news clips of the many kids just going to class and doing their homework,making good grades and simply getting an education, doesnt make good news clips.Its not news, but showing kids getting into hot water or doing something illegal is news.
So who do you think gets all the press?
Its still true today BTW.

I think you are rather missing the point of what makes news. Sure, except in very rare cases most of us continue with our normal day-to-day life and never take part in the events being covered in the news. However, if something really is news (and I will grant you that the media covers a lot of fluff that hardly qualifies as news), it does have a longer term influence on the culture that does in the end affect us in our day to day life. In other cases, a localized event may be the extreme case that expresses a broader cultural trend, and such events are also worth covering. Relatively speaking, the number of people who turned out to protest the war in Vietnam was relatively small, but that small group was was the window into the large segment of society that was very unhappy about the war.

If all you care about is the news that has an immediate and direct impact on your life, you are basically choosing to ignore most of the events that shape the larger world we live in.

John of Phoenix
06-04-2007, 01:16 PM
I'll wager not many Americans would recognize that as Canadian.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/43/Canadian_Red_Ensign.svg/201px-Canadian_Red_Ensign.svg.png

This on the other hand...

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/cf/Flag_of_Canada.svg/250px-Flag_of_Canada.svg.png

Ok, never mind.

htom
06-04-2007, 01:33 PM
Michigan State University. WKME, WMSN, WOND, ... other campus radio doings, theatre shop, ... Marna and Fran.

Bob (oh, THAT Bob)
06-04-2007, 02:01 PM
I was not tuned in, I was in early grade school, not that it mattered, I was pretty brainwashed into the middle class mold up through high school, college, early working years, it wasn't until about 10 years ago that I began to ask questions and turn left.

I had never even heard of the MK-Ultra program until only a few years ago. Reading about our government's experiments with LSD, et al, on unwitting folks is one of the things that began to change my mind about a lot of things. If you don't know, you should read:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mk_ultra

I do like to walk through Haight-Ashbury these days and wonder what it was like back then. And how cheaply I could have bought a house in San Francisco proper! Not very hippie-thinking, I know. Lots of very rich ex-hippies there now.

I do think that a lot of the free thinking of the 60s did positively influence business in later years. Many microcomputers were started by people who wanted a way around the system. These weren't radical hippies, but neither were they the button down types that went to work for IBM and others; it can be argued that they were influenced by what they saw around them. May not seem very radical, but look at what it wrought; (relatively) independent means of communication, distribution of information, publishing, although for some of that they co-opted something very establishment, ARPANET.

gert
06-04-2007, 02:08 PM
new high school in grade 9 and hating it

brad9798
06-04-2007, 02:55 PM
I was almost -2! ;)

Rancocas
06-04-2007, 03:00 PM
In 1967 I was in the navy, and volunteering for the river patrol boats in Vietnam. I couldn't get on a patrol boat, but I did transfer to a destroyer that departed for the western Pacific and Vietnam early that autumn. For Thanksgiving dinner that year, I remember that I had a hamburger on Waikiki Beach in Hawaii. Vietnam, Hong Kong, Phillipines, Japan, Taiwan, Thailand - quite an adventure.

However, the summer of '65 was a wonderful time for me, too. I was 17 then, and employed as a lifeguard at a public beach. Girls. Girls. Girls.

PatCox
06-04-2007, 03:39 PM
I was between kindergarten and first grade. But I had four brothers and sisters in High school. They were cheerleaders and jocks, though, so there was little of the counterculture around my house. I remember the music. I loved the Doors song, "Love her madly." My brothers and sisters were also big fans of the Mammas and the Pappas. My sister had "Inna Godda Da Vida," but my dad banned it from the house. I knew when Woodstock happened, my brothers and sisters talked about it, but none went.

The world didn't seem to turn upside down or anything.

There was machinegun fire on the news every night, I associate the sound with dinner. Its amazing how they are totally censoring this war, in comparison.

Gary E
06-04-2007, 04:53 PM
in 67 I was keeping all that machinery running that was cranking out Choppers for Vertol, now called Boeing and many other defense contractors making stuff for the guys in Nam...

And... awaiting my first born to arrive in Oct....
And lots of week ends at the Jersey Shore....

Phillip Allen
06-04-2007, 05:18 PM
I graduated HS in the spring of '67

Memphis Mike
06-04-2007, 05:36 PM
In 67 I was only nine years old but my older brother had just graduated college and moved to the DC area. We took a trip that summer to see him and went into DC. I witnessed one of the war protests on the mall while we we there and saw all the hippys and flower children and thought wow, how totally cool.:cool:

That was the day I decided to be a Liberal.

I also remember Georgetown before it became so exclusive. Lots of hippys hung out there. There were head shops everywhere.

It would be another year before I dropped my first hit of acid and really came of age.

Bill R
06-04-2007, 05:42 PM
In 1967, I wasn't. I wouldn't come along for a couple more years...

peb
06-04-2007, 05:46 PM
It would be another year before I dropped my first hit of acid and really came of age.

10 years old and doing acid.

You guys actually look back on this time with nostalgia?

botebum
06-04-2007, 05:46 PM
In 67 I was only nine years old but my older brother had just graduated college and moved to the DC area. We took a trip that summer to see him and went into DC. I witnessed one of the war protests on the mall while we we there and saw all the hippys and flower children and thought wow, how totally cool.:cool:

That was the day I decided to be a Liberal.

I also remember Georgetown before it became so exclusive. Lots of hippys hung out there. There were head shops everywhere.

It would be another year before I dropped my first hit of acid and really came of age.You drooped acid at 10 years old:eek: :eek:

Doug

Memphis Mike
06-04-2007, 05:51 PM
Snorted Testers Airplane glue, too.

botebum
06-04-2007, 05:55 PM
Snorted Testers Airplane glue, too.
Eventually, all things come clear:D

Doug

bob goeckel
06-04-2007, 05:57 PM
was actually in the haight-ashbury some in 67'

adampet
06-04-2007, 06:02 PM
Let's see.. I was 8, watching my oldest brother graduate from High School and head to MIT with a student deferment. My next oldest brother was warned not to drop out as he'd be drafted. Dana did eventually join the Navy when he graduated, served on a helicopter carrier off the coast during the fall of Saigon. I remember Bobby Kennedy, MLK and Kent State. They changed my life.

Adam

Todd Bradshaw
06-04-2007, 06:14 PM
I was fifteen. I had a part time job renting rowboats for the park district (a 15-year-old left alone in a shack with a pile of cash in a not-so-nice neighborhood until 9:00 PM). These days, I probably would have ended up shot to death and dumped in the lake within a week. The rest of my time was spent hanging around with an old guy who sold canoes and in a high school rock band (Hagstrom bass and an old Ampeg B-15). One of the gals from school had a Ford Falcon convertable that we would all pile into and cruise around in. I remember once going to somebody's house where there were a bunch of kids from another school sniffing glue (not a pretty picture and a waste of perfectly good styrene) but nobody I knew was doing real drugs. I don't know about the college-aged kids. Used to visit a couple of "head shops" on campus. The blacklight posters were pretty cool, but I still hate the smell of incense and have no use for beaded curtains in doorways. Met the "Roly-Poly Man" from the Donovan song at one. He was in there selling them hippy supplies.

hokiefan
06-04-2007, 06:25 PM
Summer of '67 I was 6 and just finished first grade. Beyond that I was living a pretty oblivious middle-class conservative life in a rural small town. My Dad was an Army vet from the Korean era, but fighting died down before he ended up over there. He spent time in Germany instead. He was a "Do your duty, but don't volunteer for anything stupid." kind of guy. Somewhere in that timeframe, my Sunday School teacher's son was flying attack helicopters in 'Nam, so we kept up with his well being. We knew hippies existed, but they didn't show in our little town for quite a few years.

For all of you who were serving in Vietnam, thanks.

Bobby

ccmanuals
06-04-2007, 06:56 PM
Looks like four of us graduated HS in 67.

Chris Ostlind
06-04-2007, 08:15 PM
I was in Signal Corps. Officer Candidate School at Ft. Gordon, Georgia. Running through the red hills and dense pine forests in search of my naive future as a 2nd Lieutenant with Vietnam staring me directly in the face.

I remember hearing the Doors playing from one of the windows of the Tactical Officer quarters and thought, "what the hell is that cool **** and how much more great music have I missed while getting my butt kicked around daily by officer dorks from New Mexico?"

Chris

carioca1232001
06-04-2007, 09:37 PM
In June ´67, sat succesfully for the Part 1 B.Sc Honours examinations in EE. 'Procol Harum' launch their single:'A whiter shade of pale'.
Myself and an English mate from London´s Golders Green district make a bee-line to Lisbon, via France and Spain, by train. The rail-track in France was impressive, no 'clickety-clack' on the north-south main lines, all-welded rails. On entering Portugal , a steam-powered locomotive hauls the train all the way to Lisbon.
A grand-uncle of mine awaits us on arrival at Lisbon´s train terminal and after greeting us says: 'Welcome from Britain. The first nation to recognise union between people of the same sex '. He had a newspaper (or cutting thereof) to prove his point. Yes, this indeed did occur, and was much publicised, in and out of Britain at the time !
Most marvellous holiday in Lisbon, as my other grand-uncle´s son, Luis, introduces us to Lisbon´s youthful crowd.
Back to London in mid July´67 and to some great parties at nº 6, Fawley Rd, West Hamptead, where my Greek friend and colleague from university shared a flat with two other students. He had just returned from Athens. At one such party, a delightful young-lady from New York introduces us to an LP from 'The Grateful Dead'. Hadn´t heard of them before.
Great times !

The unhappy events of summer/fall ´67:

The Arab-Israeli 6-day war
The murderous coup led by Colonel Papadopolous that saw Greece plunging into a dungeon of repression, torture and denial of basic civil-rights.
The Vietnam war raging on as ever

Robbie 2
06-04-2007, 10:07 PM
I was 8 on the family farm sheep/beef and dairy enjoying hunting and fishing...didn't know any girls...

Katherine
06-04-2007, 10:08 PM
I was still a decade in the making.

ishmael
06-04-2007, 10:14 PM
Thanks for the memories and insights.

My home was in absolute chaos at the time because of the war. Pop was a dyed in the wool Republican, navy vet, and supporter of the war. Mom, a Kennedy Democrat. Eldest brother was working his heart out as an assistant to the mayor of Detroit and anti-war activist. He was just a year from refusing induction into the army. He was a brave young fellow, didn't run to Canada, just stood and took it. The energy in the arguments that ensued in that household could have fueled a small city.

I'll tell ya one thing for sure. It was vibrant. The politics, the music, the people, all more awake than typical. Our inner cities were afire with race, and thousands were marching here and there against the war. Nixon and Kissinger, Kent State, the double assassinations of our princes, just over the horizon. The pill, the changes that wrought. Even though I was living a fairly insulated middle-class life, I didn't come away unscathed. It was a helluva time to be coming of age. Though in hindsight the fabric didn't come that close to unraveling, it had that sense, in the air.

Just a bit of trivia. Did you realize Joni Mitchell wrote her anthem to Woodstock in a hotel room in New York City? As close as she got to that affair.

P.S. I wish I'd saved my draft card. It was the last year of the draft. My number was 183. Each birthday, each year, got a number assigned by lottery. 183 would have been inducted, if the war had continued.

LeeG
06-04-2007, 11:20 PM
between 6th and 7th grade going from elementary school to jr. high. Rope ladder up the pepper tree in Bakersfield, drinking warm beer once, summer nights. Vandalism lost it's thrill, social conscience developing, overfed and underexercised. Visiting grandmothers place in LA, swimming in Avalon Harbor Catalina Island. Major fantasy life, reading Heinlein. Watching cooking shows with mom. Driving to Montgomery Wards with Dad in '59 VW campervan. Backyard plays, I ran the lights. Neighbors thought we were weird.
Mom and dad played in Philharmonic orchestra, I fell asleep listening until my brother elbowed me. Started cornet lessons then gave up in a week.
Summer of love and other happenings on the news totally irrelevant to this 12yr olds life except in so far as they affected my folks. Oh,,my great grandfather died at the age of 101.

pcford
06-04-2007, 11:20 PM
I was between my junior and senior years at the University of California. Living on Channing Way two or three blocks up the hill from Telegraph. Met Janice Joplin in the Haight. Was at the Human-Be In in January of '67. Met my future wife at Moe's Bookstore.

Wonderful time...brimming with hope. Unfortunately, we did not understand the intransigence of evil. Never had a student deferment and the Federal government had plans for me. For me personally, now is better. Much better. But I sometimes wax nostalgic.

I was there.

geeman
06-04-2007, 11:54 PM
I remember meeting Pat Benetar at a friends house.She was a year or 2 younger then me.
She didnt let me "Hit her with my best Shot"
As far as I got was her cute little (very flat) bra with the pink bow on the front,,,,,,,,,
I didnt know her as Pat, I knew her as Patricia.

ishmael
06-05-2007, 12:18 AM
"I came upon a child of god, he was walking along the road, yeah
And I asked him, where are you going? This he told me.

I'm going down to Yaskers farm, gonna play in a rock and roll band
Gonna live out on the land and set my soul free.

We are stardust, we are golden and we have to get ourselves back to the garden."

Mitchell

WX
06-05-2007, 12:48 AM
1967....Year 10 high school aged 15, couldn't leave fast enough. Loathed and detested the place...got the cane just a few too many times for trivia.

Bob (oh, THAT Bob)
06-05-2007, 01:25 AM
Eldest brother was working his heart out as an assistant to the mayor of Detroit and anti-war activist....

Just a bit of trivia. Did you realize Joni Mitchell wrote her anthem to Woodstock in a hotel room in New York City? As close as she got to that affair.

Bad year to be assistant to the mayor in Detroit.

From Wikipedia: Mitchell wrote the song after missing and then hearing about Woodstock (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woodstock_Festival). She had cancelled her appearance at the festival on the advice of her manager for fear that she would miss a scheduled appearance on The Dick Cavett Show (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Dick_Cavett_Show), and has since said the decision to miss the concert was one of the biggest regrets of her life.

Voice like a nightengale, stunningly beautiful, a national treasure of poetry.

Love your taste in music Jack, you're winnin' me over. :)

By the way, I was a couple of miles away from Woodstock when it happened, but I was young and clueless. And it's Yasgur's farm.

Tylerdurden
06-05-2007, 05:00 AM
I remember meeting Pat Benetar at a friends house.She was a year or 2 younger then me.
She didnt let me "Hit her with my best Shot"
As far as I got was her cute little (very flat) bra with the pink bow on the front,,,,,,,,,
I didnt know her as Pat, I knew her as Patricia.

A Lucky man, She's a Looker even now. Must have been cute then.

Tylerdurden
06-05-2007, 05:18 AM
I was only 6 years in 67 and really all I can remember was being downtown with my parents and seeing a hippie couple walking down the street ahead of us. The dude had his hand down her jeans holding her arse and my Dad and mom were upset by the display.
That and the war on TV every night and my girl Bonnie. Used to go out back and do things we knew nothing about.

One real bad memory though, A huge crash outside my front door.
Running out and seeing a Black family after a head on collision with a truck. A couple were dead and the others were seriously injured.
My parents and older siblings rushing to help and me comforting a boy a bit older than me by talking to him as he sat on the curb.
He was cut and so scared. My mom scooped him up and took him to the ambulance. I never found out what happened afterward but always wondered about that little boy.
It taught me we are all human beings though, Just wish I didn't have to learn like that.

Ric_Bergstrom
06-05-2007, 06:33 AM
I was almost 2....so I'd imagine lots of time in the kiddie pool.

Ian McColgin
06-05-2007, 06:53 AM
That summer break from college was my first yacht job. The trans-Atlantic cruise caused me to miss some things but I got a major hit . . .

I'd marked the locations for WWVA and WABC, the two strongest AM stations I might get far at sea. I'd learned how to do departures, by the way, so a DF fix from a thousand miles out would work.

So there we are, romping towards home from the Azores and I managed a fix on WWVA. Nulled it quick as they were playing something like "Momma left me her Bible." Then on to WABC. Got this tune. Put the ariel normal to get it loud. Never heard a rock song last so long. Really. The first song ever played in the long version on AM.

"Light My Fire"

What a cool way to find America again.

ishmael
06-05-2007, 07:36 AM
Bob,

Mitchell's early albums are I think my favorite of any artist. That voice, that poetry. And a looker to boot! LOL. I wouldn't call her classically beautiful, but a certain grace. Finast kind. She started to lose her way with what was it, Hegira? But those first handful, pure genius.

So much good music from that time. Brother, the one who later was in the thick of it, got drunk with both Bob Dylan and then later Phil Oaks at his fraternity, after they'd played their sets. Bob got sick from too much booze, and we know what happened to Phil not too many years hence.

Working for the mayor of Detroit was a tough job that summer. Turmoil. But he was young and hungry and foolish, hanging out with the likes of Angela Davis in Ann Arbor, reading Karl Marx. I sound like I'm dropping names, but am really just trying for a picture. He had to quit that job when he refused to be drafted. Too controversial.

Thanks again for the memories, all.

Dan McCosh
06-05-2007, 01:07 PM
How did 1967 become the "summer of love" It marked three straight years of murderous urban riots and Woodstock was still two years in the future. The Mitchell siblings were indeed playing around town, FWIW.

John of Phoenix
06-05-2007, 01:54 PM
In spite of it all...
The beginning of the Summer of Love has popularly been attributed to the Human Be-In at Golden Gate Park on January 14, 1967. The size of that event awakened mass media to the hippie counterculture that was blossoming in the Haight-Ashbury. The movement was fed by the counterculture's own media, particularly The San Francisco Oracle, whose pass-around readership topped a half-million at its peak that year. The grassroots street theater/activism of The Diggers also garnered media attention.

College and high school students began streaming into the Haight on their spring break of 1967. City government leaders, determined to stop the influx of young people once schools let out for summer, brought added attention to the scene. An ongoing series of articles in local papers alerted national media to the hippies' growing momentum. That spring, Haight community leaders responded by forming the Council of the Summer of Love, giving the word-of-mouth event an official-sounding name.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Summer_of_Love

Dan McCosh
06-05-2007, 04:05 PM
Ah. When the media discovered the hippie. I remember 1967 as the year when friends began to trickle back from San Francisco and New York, weary of the impact of the surge in drug dealing on the street life.

ishmael
06-05-2007, 05:21 PM
I'm not at all glorifying the time. I was making box kites, and flying them on spools of thread. The control line model airplanes were a fascination too. Jenny Wilkinson took up more than a few hours.

Do you remember first slow dancing with a girl to one of those silly rock ballads? Clarice Cole. The first graspings after sex. Marvelous.

Now, well now there would be no grasping or yearning. The left, and it is the left, has given license.

John of Phoenix
06-05-2007, 05:33 PM
Now, well now there would be no grasping or yearning. The left, and it is the left, has given license.
Decoder ring please...

ishmael
06-05-2007, 05:49 PM
You want a decoder ring, eh?

One of the last times at my mother's house I was poking around, working on the car, ya know just hanging out. A summer afternoon. I've told this before, but I'll tell it again. A girl, a young woman, came running out of the neighbor's house, pretty much hysterical. Teen aged girls can be hysterical without a lot of prompting, but she was distraught. I took her in my arms, tried to sooth her. What's going on? You're safe now, I won't hurt you. I was all of twenty five, and she was a wounded thing, all of thirteen. The parents were gone for the weekend, and she'd just had sex with the young man of the manor in a not very friendly way at a "the parents are gone" party.

Those first gropings are important, and I think the ethic which kept a bit of a lid on them important too. The license in that house was not the charm and distance and affection I felt as a kid. Does that decode it sufficiently?

Lew Barrett
06-05-2007, 06:39 PM
In 1967 I was in school at Stony Brook, an undergrad and reasonably confused about things in general. I was depressed and angered at the same time by the prospect of being drafted. Drugs, especially pot and LSD, were relatively available on campus, though not universally so or I never would have graduated. As it was, the last two years of school were pretty, uh, distracting. The SF Summer of Love had no special significance to me. We were doing a reasonable facsimile of it in New York. I can say that San Francisco, did hold a certain charm and allure that in fact I acted on a few years later when I moved west.
I'm one who did make it to Woodstock in '69 and had more or less a good time there, though I remember it more as a wet and somewhat uncomfortable experience. Even as a bonefide hippie wannabe, I felt a bit out of place at Woodstock though. I always figured other people knew more about what was actually going on than I did, and I never felt as if I actually fit in anywhere. Smoking dope was fun though, and I liked the music, so there I was.
I was one of the idiots who bought a full three day set of tickets and, upon finding out they were not required for entrance, threw them away. I had four sets of them; purchased for my girl and her two friends and we thought it was pretty useless to hold onto them. It was in the spirit of the moment to toss them over our shoulders. I hear three day Woodstock tickets sell for big money to collectors these days.
When I finally got out of school, they instituted a lottery. I pulled a high number and never got called up. Though it was only by pure chance that I didn't have to serve, I was still depressed and angry about our handling of the war, as were most everyone I knew, including returning friends who'd been drafted. Some things don't change.