PDA

View Full Version : Sears 12-inch 3/4 hp bandsaw



Brian Palmer
05-18-2007, 07:13 PM
OK, I know this is not a real big boys bandsaw, but I saw one in the paper for $100 and am going to look at it tomorrow.

Any thoughts?

I don't really feel the need for a really big saw, but was just wondering how useful these are compared to, say, a jig saw and circular saw (which I already have).

Thanks in advance,

Brian

Paul Girouard
05-18-2007, 07:45 PM
OK, I know this is not a real big boys bandsaw, but I saw one in the paper for $100 and am going to look at it tomorrow.

Any thoughts?

I don't really feel the need for a really big saw, but was just wondering how useful these are compared to, say, a jig saw and circular saw (which I already have).

Thanks in advance,

Brian


Worthless , don't waste your time or money on a Sears bandsaw, buy a Bosch or Festool jigsaw you'll be happier.

Rich VanValkenburg
05-18-2007, 07:58 PM
I have a 20 year old Sears 12 inch bandsaw and the only complaint I have is that it's finally worn out the upper wheel bearing. The blade is starting to oscillate. If you look at this saw seriously, make sure the wheel bearings are still good. I haven't priced the repair yet.
Mine has been a good saw. I got my money's worth. I have no use for a jigsaw, but each to their own.

Rich

capt jake
05-18-2007, 08:57 PM
OK, I know this is not a real big boys bandsaw, but I saw one in the paper for $100 and am going to look at it tomorrow.

Any thoughts?

I don't really feel the need for a really big saw, but was just wondering how useful these are compared to, say, a jig saw and circular saw (which I already have).

Thanks in advance,

Brian

I have one that has been a source of major frustration at times. Though I use it often, it will not cut thick stock very accurately. I ended up buying a Grizzly 18" recently to fulfill that requirement.

I have kept the old Craftsman for small tasks and thin metals (which it works well at)., but for the majority of the woodworking I do with a bandsaw, I am using the 18", 2 hp.

Heck, you can't have too many tools. :D:D

Cuyahoga Chuck
05-18-2007, 09:38 PM
To make consistant controled cuts on a band saw you need adequit blade tension and good guides and rollers. If the bandsaw 's frame isn't strong enough the blade can't be pulled very tight. Slackness in the blade means your guides and rollers have to work harder to keep the blade running true. Most of the low end saws are aluminum framed rather than cast iron so the potential tension is not going to be very high.
Bandsaw hardware takes regular tune-ups to keep the blade under control. Low end saws have low end hardware which is more inclined to get out of wack quickly. So more attention to adjustments must be made if you are doing something that demands precision.
I have a bandsaw "how-to" video from "Fine Woodworking". The guy in the video shows the range of stuff that can be done with a bandsaw. Dovetails, marquetry, resawing, the works. But, all the various saws he used were high end models with expensive accessory guides and blocks.
The low end saws will work but, you can never be sure your last adjustment is still in effect.

Mrleft8
05-18-2007, 09:51 PM
Junk.
Look for an old Delta or Rockwell 14" in the paper. Even an abused old Delta can be brought back into stellar service. The newer ones.....Enh..... Still worth it over a sears 12"

pipefitter
05-18-2007, 10:50 PM
I use one every day. If it is tuned up,it will work just like a bandsaw. The one in the picture behind my boat is around 20 yrs old. I also have one like it about the same age and also ran it in this shop daily. No it's not the cats adze of bandsaws but for 100 bucks,you can use it for one for a very long time. Frequently,I have to resaw 3/4" kingboard 4" x 6-1/4" into equal wedges for the baseplates of outriggers so that they will sit plumb on a canted aluminum structure. Guess which saw I choose for the task? No,not the Rockwell next to it. If you tighten up the stand,tighten the bellt so that it doesn't have too much play,it can be made to work. I cut near machine precision copes to 60 deg on sched 40 aluminum pipe up to 2".

http://home.earthlink.net/~tigmaster41/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/near1.jpg

If you just want a bandsaw and it's one of the older ones like is pictured. . . 100 dollars isnt a bad deal.
C'mon guys. . . a hundred bucks? I paid 75 for mine 12 years ago. I only took it home because others were abusing it and wouldn't fix the one in the picture. It needed the blade guides adjusted and a new tire.

Here's a hint. Don't buy the home depot blades. Get the lennox. I have a Lennox blade on there now(wood cutting) that I have been cutting aluminum with now for 3 months. Actually,2 fabricators using it. The other guy likes this saw as well. The delta blades and the craftsmen blades are too thin. They will wander off no matter how well you tune the guides or how low you have them to the cut. I can cut circles 3/4" in diameter of 1/4" flat bar to cap the ends of 3/4" tubes with it with a 1/4" x 80" x 6tpi blade.

The bearings are standard. 6202 or 6302. I can't remember if it is 1/2" or 5/8ths shaft . You can find the bearings at a bearing house or an electric motor shop for around 5-8.00 each. I prefer the fafnir bearings over the taiwani bearings.

Adjust the blade so it rings like a guitar string. Usually just beyond what the blade tension guide shows inside the cover. The frame is stout enough to make up to a 1/2" blade ring.

Paul Girouard
05-18-2007, 11:09 PM
OK IF it a older one it's worth the risk, if it's the plastic case , light weight steel table / bed I'd pass. Sears sold some real junk in the 80's and 90's .


I was commenting at work, just this week, there's a really good selection of tools today , pretty nice stuff for a fair price , where as 20 years ago good tools where hard to find and spendy.

pipefitter
05-18-2007, 11:20 PM
The table on the one pictured is iron but the blade cover is plastic. The craftsman that really sucked is the one that the saw tilted instead of the table. But these can be tuned to do some amazing things with a little patience on the tuning end. It's more in the blade in most cases than the saw itself. My boss bought the Delta in the picture from an auction for 400.00 used. It's a multi speed metal cutting saw. I told him to save his money but it was an image thing to him.And he still uses the sorry saw too! And yes,he hears about it. Hey. . . you use YOUR saw. He was the problem with the sorry saw in the first place. Bought bearing blade guides and such. I reversed them after he lost the stock blocks and now it is normal and predictable again :)

Brian Palmer
05-19-2007, 06:55 PM
OK, I bought it and brought it home this morning.

It actually seems fairly substantial. Definitely a step above the smaller 9 inch saws and the 3-wheel saws. Yes, it has a plastic cover, but the cast frame seems pretty beefy and stiff. The saw without the stand and motor weighs at least 60 lbs, so there has to be some meat somewhere.

The blade guide adjustments seem reasonabley well thought out, but I am still a beginner here.

I set it up and ran it enough to cut a 2-inch thick piece of locust and it did fine.

I guess we'll see if I still like it after I've used it some more.

--Brian

StevenBauer
05-19-2007, 07:18 PM
I had the one that was like a little shipsaw. The table (large) stayed flat and the saw tilted, just like the big old shipsaws of old. It cut the two inch white oak for the stem of my skiff just fine. Get a good blade (timberwolf) and go slow.

Steven