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Osborne Russell
04-20-2007, 11:02 AM
Only one I ever had with any pedigree was at the Napoleon House in New Orleans.

Here's the recipe from sazerac.com:


The Original Sazerac Cocktail

Take two heavy-bottomed 3 1/2-oz. Bar glasses; fill one with cracked ice and allow it to chill while placing a lump of sugar with just enough water to moisten it.

Crush the saturated lump of sugar with a bar spoon. Add a few drops of Peychaud's Bitters, a jigger of rye whisky and several lumps of ice and stir briskly.

Empty the first glass of ice, dash in several drops of Herbsaint, twirl the glass rapidly and shake out the absinthe. Enough of it will cling to the glass to impart the desired flavor. Strain into this glass the rye whisky mixture prepared in the other glass. Twist a lemon peel over the glass, but do not put it in the drink.



1. Is Herbsaint absinthe?
2. I thought absinthe was illegal.
3. What's a good substitute?

Mrleft8
04-20-2007, 04:52 PM
I think that "Pastis" is the usual substitute. But you can make your own with a little wormwood.....
Edited to add:Herbsaint is a brand name of anise-flavored liquor, originally made in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Herbsaint first appeared in 1934. It was the creation of J.M. Legendre of New Orleans, who learned how to make absinthe while in France during World War I. It first went on sale following the repeal of Prohibition, and was unique in its category as an absinthe substitute, as opposed to a pastis. Although Herbsaint was originally produced under the name "Legendre Absinthe" it never contained wormwood. The alcohol control bureau at the time objected to the use of the word Absinthe so it was changed to Legendre Herbsaint. The Sazerac company bought the J.M. Legendre & Co. on January 1, 1940. The original recipe was used for many years, but was eventually changed in the 1970s, producing the modern Herbsaint available today.

Osborne Russell
04-20-2007, 05:28 PM
Wow! Someone who's heard of it! Thanks!

I Googled herbsaint and found some references in recipes but no place to email order it. Is that because of the alcohol?

Also, one recipe insists on rye, maybe cognac, not bourbon.

High C
04-20-2007, 05:34 PM
I work right across the street from the Fairmont Hotel and its "Sazerac" bar, at least I did before Katrina flooded the theater. Maybe again someday....It's a beautiful bar.

http://www.nolacuisine.com/2005/10/27/sazerac-cocktail-recipe/

http://www.nolacuisine.com/wp-images/media/sazerac-cocktail.jpg

Osborne Russell
04-20-2007, 06:36 PM
Some say Pernod is OK. Guess it'll have to be in default of Herbsaint or Patis. Got my rye and Peychaud's, here goes nothing.

Mrleft8
04-20-2007, 06:49 PM
I work right across the street from the Fairmont Hotel and its "Sazerac" bar, at least I did before Katrina flooded the theater. Maybe again someday....It's a beautiful bar.

http://www.nolacuisine.com/2005/10/27/sazerac-cocktail-recipe/

http://www.nolacuisine.com/wp-images/media/sazerac-cocktail.jpg Is that the/What's the name of the hotel that has the goddamned revolving bar? That damned place made me feel completely BLOTTO after 2 friggin' beers!!!! :D :D

High C
04-21-2007, 12:20 AM
Is that the/What's the name of the hotel that has the goddamned revolving bar? That damned place made me feel completely BLOTTO after 2 friggin' beers!!!! :D :D

No, that's the Hilton, but they all rotate if ya drink enough. :eek: :D

Osborne, keep us posted. I wanna know if you like the drink. I don't think I've ever had one.

Osborne Russell
04-21-2007, 08:52 AM
Osborne, keep us posted. I wanna know if you like the drink. I don't think I've ever had one.

Didn't happen last night as Al Gore told me a trip to the store just to get Sazerac stuff was uncool.

The one I had at the Napoleon House was the best cocktail I ever had, but I don't generally like cocktails. Whisky gives it body, the other stuff gives it a flavor I would describe as "herbal licorice" and then it has a bit of sugar and lemon oil to kind of take of the rough edges. Sounds bad, I know. Sounds like bourbon and Jagermeister.

The way I look at it, if it stayed around this long in a place that has food like New Orleans, it has to be good.

High C
04-21-2007, 10:42 AM
...the Napoleon House...The way I look at it, if it stayed around this long in a place that has food like New Orleans, it has to be good.

Among New Orleanians, the Sazerac is seen mostly as a drink of historical curiosity, offered in historical places like the Napoleon House and of course the Fairmont's Sazerac, but is rarely actually consumed. I'll have to try one. :cool:

bamamick
04-21-2007, 10:48 AM
Blackened grouper, black beans, and rice fail me anywhere but Key West. The best fried seafood comes from restaurants right here at home, etc. Some of that heavy air in New Orleans probably flavored the drink that you want to make, wouldn't you think?

Mickey Lake

High C
04-21-2007, 10:53 AM
...Some of that heavy air in New Orleans probably flavored the drink that you want to make, wouldn't you think?


Some folks say that's the case with our superb French bread, the air, the water, or something. It's hard to duplicate elsewhere.

Osborne Russell
04-21-2007, 12:06 PM
One thing that learned by going to N.O. is just how much of American culture it is, imitation, real, for better or worse.

Several times I'd see or smell or hear something, and the first thought would be, "Oh, they're just doing that New Orleans thing."

Then: "Wait a minute . . . this is New Orleans!"

Like the difference between the toy department and Santa's workshop.

High C
04-21-2007, 02:24 PM
One thing that learned by going to N.O. is just how much of American culture it is, imitation, real, for better or worse.

Several times I'd see or smell or hear something, and the first thought would be, "Oh, they're just doing that New Orleans thing."

Then: "Wait a minute . . . this is New Orleans!"....

Yeah, you right! :D