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Phillip Allen
04-15-2007, 03:57 PM
Watching these million dollar horses and the folks riding...such conspicuous indulgence...

Exactly what is the point of "posting"?

Ian McColgin
04-15-2007, 04:16 PM
Do you mean by posting the rise and fall while trotting? If that's it, it would help to know a bit about riding, but in short, posting harmonizers the rider to a quick trot. In western riding the trot is only used for a gentle gait, hardly faster than a good walk, and one can sit to it. Foreward or hunter seat riding allows for a faster trot that's easy on both horse and rider.

Steeple chasing, like flat racing, is very conspicuous consumption but it's also some seriously kick-ass riding.

Phillip Allen
04-15-2007, 04:37 PM
That's what I thought about posting...however after hundreds of hours in the saddle and cross country riding, I find it teadious and pointless...I just wondered if I was missing something...I guess not. It seems of limited use though I suppose I must do some kind of modified postig...

Ian McColgin
04-15-2007, 05:22 PM
Try eight or ten hours following the hounds and then rounding up the strays at the end and you'll instantly see the value of the fast trot as a mile eating gait and posting to it as the only way to survive with discs in tact.

Again, not denigrating western style riding, but this is really quite different. Surely there are others here besides myself who know and appreciate both.

Katherine
04-15-2007, 08:38 PM
I've done both. Since I originally learned to ride with a stock saddle and a horse that neck reined, I've never been all that great at posting. Part of it has to do with the different saddle set ups. Look at how the stirrup and seat set-ups are for each style. Even in English riding the set up between jumping and saddle horses is different. Each set up reflects the intended purpose. As for a western horse only trotting at an accelerated walk, bull. The horse I had when I was younger (a 1/2 Arab, 1/2 quarter horse mix) had a fast, but wonderfully smooth trot.

Bruce Taylor
04-15-2007, 09:05 PM
As for a western horse only trotting at an accelerated walk, bull

When I used to frequent Arabian horse shows (and ride in them, on occasion) entries in Western classes were penalized if the jog became an extended trot. I rode one horse that had an astonishingly quick (but actually quite comfortable) jog, and she was regularly marked down for it. What the judges wanted to see was a leisurely, ambling gait.

In English classes, of course, an extended trot was the norm and everyone was expected to post.

Ian McColgin
04-16-2007, 03:34 AM
By the way, many folk post with too much weight in their stirrups. We learned to post bare back, which certainly cures that. If anything, my sister and I grew up putting too little weight below the knees. Anyway, keeping good form bareback, heels down and all, for a couple hours a day will certainly make a strong rider.

Phillip Allen
04-16-2007, 06:38 AM
By the way, many folk post with too much weight in their stirrups. We learned to post bare back, which certainly cures that. If anything, my sister and I grew up putting too little weight below the knees. Anyway, keeping good form bareback, heels down and all, for a couple hours a day will certainly make a strong rider.


Now there's a thought...I may try that

S.V. Airlie
04-16-2007, 06:40 AM
Kinda on the topic..
There is a guy buried in Cooperstowqn with his favorite dog and his favorite horse. I think his wife is buried five states over.
Anyway, the horse won the grand national back in umm 1934?
Just a bit of trivia
Oh yes, I forgot.. Liz Taylor wasn't riding!!!!

Phillip Allen
04-16-2007, 07:31 AM
Sarah informed me this morning that Matt's new colt (6 or 7 months old) has taken up biting hell outa folks...any suggestions (seems likely to do with weening)

Phillip Allen
04-16-2007, 08:17 AM
She said he tried to bite her several times yesterday while she was helping work on a sick hoof belonging to Matt's big gelding...all she could think of was reaching out and holding his mouth shut like you would a dog...he'll outgrow that pretty quick!

Mrleft8
04-16-2007, 08:47 AM
I post while driving my Jeep. It's good to learn where all the hidden dips and bumps in the road are...

Phillip Allen
04-16-2007, 08:51 AM
I post while driving my Jeep. It's good to learn where all the hidden dips and bumps in the road are...

Do you bump your head a lot?

Ian McColgin
04-16-2007, 09:10 AM
The secret of posting without stirrups is to let the horse's motion put you up. It's all in harmoney.

So many folk post too high, getting to nearly straightened legs, that there are actually equitation judges, or were forty five years ago, who knocked points off my sister and I for not posting high enough, in their opinion. These were the same folk who liked to see an open hunter take the course at a very slow collected canter rather than a hand gallop so we, following Mother's decree rather than the judges, did it as a real hunter would, not like some ring bound sissey who probably could not jump barbed wire, fallen unlimbed trees, and other real life obsticles.

Enough of this rant. Just start the stirrupless or bare back in short sessions and in a place where if you do fall off and if your horse really doesn't care enough to stick around, it's not too long a walk home. Even a strong rider will ache at first doing this but it will improve your seat a thousandfold.

And remember, good form. Back straight and clean line shoulder to knee to toe. Heels down. Toes out. I can hear Mother now - it's as invigorating as her constant "Bear up. Bear Up. Bear off. You're pininching. . . " always was afloat.

G'luck

cjp63
04-16-2007, 03:45 PM
It took me 2 years to figure out what a "diagonal" was while my daughter was posting...watch your diagonal...watch your diagonal...

paladin
04-16-2007, 05:04 PM
who could afford saddles.....all we had wuz a hackamore and a blanket....:D

Phillip Allen
04-16-2007, 06:41 PM
What? No prairie chicken snare?!

paladin
04-16-2007, 08:24 PM
My sisters went to a dude ranch in New Mexico while I was home in the late 60's......and wanted to do a "trail ride".....I showed up that morning to spend a couple of days with them, they had the horses out and were being "entertained" on how to properly saddle the horses.....I put the blanket on mine, then took the lead rope and made a hackamore, then mounted the horse from the right side, the "wrangler" just about lost her teeth...kinda got upset and saying "you never mount a horse that way"...I asked why not. She said they're trained to be mounted from the left side.....
I asked who broke her horses...she replied that some of the local indians.......I said, "yup, and they did it right".....me and horse got along just fine...he was even gentle and sorta sneaky trying to steal the carrots out of my back pocket.....:D

Ian McColgin
04-17-2007, 05:33 AM
About the biting - it's tough.

One of the ring/school horses we took in to retrain for the field had this very bad habit. We got another who tended to kick when groomed - a similar problem.

We tried the conventional reward and punishment theory but the normal way to apply punishment is really all wrong for the problem, exacerbating the issue. The horse is reacting to some fear and a flogging does nothing to resolve that fear.

The only punishment that might work is if you are very fast, so that when he tries to nip his mouth simply runs into a sharp edged of the hand.

Far better is to spend a lot of soothing time in his face. Litterally. No halter, probably. But stay by his head and just commune. Talk. Murmer. Hang out. If you're close he can't really get a nip going and you can deflect it gently, pleasantly, so he figures out that you're not there to annoy him.

Call the folks at "Barking Mad" on the Animal Planet TV network.

Well, they are all in England so forget that idea, but spend time getting close. The horse really will let you know what's wrong.

Phillip Allen
04-17-2007, 05:38 AM
I'm not an expert at trainning hosses but when I had mine I made it a point to mount from either side often...it seemed reasonable to me. Part of the reason for my original question is the stilted attitude folks have about the "right" way to do this or that. Thinking about it now, I imagine the mounting always from the left is much like the military demanding socks and the like be folded and placed in the locker in just the right place is similar...perhaps the haters of the military don't make the connection and are just led along by the nose...

Ian McColgin
04-17-2007, 05:54 AM
Horses can be trained to be mounted from either side but commonly are not because horses are, in the main, very much creatures of habit and regularity. It's easier to stay in their comfort zone if all the parts of joining up for the horse/human partnership are comfortably ritualized.

People who talk to their horses know this and thus can, in an emergency, break the mode without ill effect.

Meanwhile, folk who respect their horses and how they have been trained will mount from the left.

People who just want a light hack for poking about the countryside, people who don't want a horse capeable of taking a four foot six wire fence with a couple foot drop into a rocky stream bed with a right angle turn to jump out, people uninterested in the limits of horse and human are perfectly free to enjoy the more sedate aspects of horsemanship. They should just refrain from sniggering at aspects of real horsemanship that they just don't get. Such folk are rather like farmers who don't know why the jib halyard is to port and the main halyard is to starboard.

Phillip Allen
04-17-2007, 06:00 AM
either that or...they have a broader understanding of things undetected by others...