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View Full Version : If you want to see the Great Barrier Reef ....



PeterSibley
04-07-2007, 04:07 AM
do it soon ,well before the next dose of 30C+ water causes another bleaching , then another .The IPCC just said thet the reef may well be dead in 20years . Our Federal Enviorment Minister say that may very well be right .

http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200704/s1891990.htm

http://www.marinebiology.org/coralbleaching.htm

PeterSibley
04-07-2007, 05:31 PM
OK ...so everyone who wants to see it has seen it ...right ?

George Jung
04-07-2007, 05:46 PM
Nope.... planning a trip there as I post now. I've heard the same said about reef systems worldwide; just visited Cozumel, real disappointment to what I remember from 15 years ago. Hope I can get some of this done in a timely fashion. The sad thing - despite an interest - is there is no apparent way to reverse this thing.

bamamick
04-07-2007, 05:47 PM
Most any of us here would certainly love to see it. I know that I would. It's just that most of us don't know what we can do to stop what it is that is harming the reef.

I spent a week in New Orleans recently. Two of the guys I was with were from Canada and the UK respectively. Both of them mentioned more than once the enormous amount of waste that they see in America, waste that the average American never notices.

In Germany in 1991 you couldn't get a plastic bag for your groceries. You were expected to bring a cloth bag with you from home and put them into it. In 2005 you could get plastic bags, but they charged you extra for them as a way of making you think a little bit about what you were doing. ALL batteries are recycled in Germany, whereas here we throw them in the trash. All of the plant sites that I have worked in recycle paper. On the plant sites they offer NO drinks in aluminum cans and recycle all of their bottles. All of this stuff is quite easy to do and not in the least incovenient, yet we Americans continue to fill our landfills with this stuff every year.

The air quality where I live has improved if you are looking at industrial emissions (I know, I do a lot of that for a living), but it has gone down in general because my home has become much more populated and the people drive their cars around town. The water quality from industrial runoff has improved in Mobile Bay, but what we do have is probably worse. What we do have is the fact that when it rains the sewer systems are so overloaded that the cities have to open the valves and allow untreated sewerage into the Bay.
That, and the huge amount of runoff of oil and gasoline from shopping center parking lots.

We are killing the earth. No doubt about it. I believe it 100%. We talked yesterday about the fishing. A show on CNN had a spokesperson who works for the SeaWorld people. She said that she has seen studies that by 2050 that we have denuded the seas of the types of fish species that people feed upon. Reminded me of a Jacques Cousteau special from the '60's or '70's where he said that there were enough fish in the sea to feed all of the people of the world FOREVER if handled with care. Here we are, 40 years later.

So, what to do about it? What to do about it? Tell me, and if it is something that I can do that would help, I will try.

Mickey Lake

TimH
04-07-2007, 05:58 PM
no use closing the barn door after the horse has already run off.
On the news this morning they were talking about how a 3 degree tep rise in the next 20 years will cause the extinction of 30 % of the species alive today.
Its a little late now.

WX
04-07-2007, 06:01 PM
She said that she has seen studies that by 2050 that we have denuded the seas of the types of fish species that people feed upon.

It's difficult to put a positive spin on this, historically we have shown an inability to manage these resources intelligently. A few examples are the Cod, Herring and now the Tuna.

The Bigfella
04-07-2007, 06:36 PM
Mickey
Two of the guys I was with were from Canada and the UK respectively. Both of them mentioned more than once the enormous amount of waste that they see in America, waste that the average American never notices.

Mate - that was my overall impression of America back in '91 - massive waste, but it has been a less than well received comment on here. The use of double the amount of oil per capita (compared to other Western, developed nations) and the per capita mining consumption of IIRC 48,000 lbs of minerals in the US are just staggering. We aren't saints down under, but plenty of things have improved in the last decade or two.

Ian

ljb5
04-07-2007, 08:43 PM
Most any of us here would certainly love to see it. I know that I would. It's just that most of us don't know what we can do to stop what it is that is harming the reef.


It's possible that our desire to see the reef is causing the damage.

I saw it in 1991. I'm afraid to go back. I noticed a lot of damage in the Caymans between 1989 and 1998. I was recently diving off Hawaii and noticed it wasn't as nice as I remembered.

The Bigfella
04-07-2007, 09:28 PM
It's possible that our desire to see the reef is causing the damage.



To a degree - greenhouse gases from tourist flights, etc. Most damage to date has been from agricultural run-off.

I've flown the length of the reef - and it is massive. There are localised areas damaged from anchors, recreational divers and so on - but we are talking a fraction of a fraction of one percent of the reef.

Not so with climate change.

Ian

PeterSibley
04-07-2007, 09:56 PM
To agree with Ian ,it will be periods of increased sea temeratures that do it .Nothing else has any reasonable comparison when it comes to impact .I've seen the reef from end to end and it is lovely beyond words .That the coral will die and wave action will destroy it , crumble it into a mass of wreckage is something that hurts even to think about .
Can we do anything ..of course .Will it stop this from happening ,can we reverse this particular catastophy.Probably not .
But what about the next one and the one after ? The have been endless nauseating discussions of the Warming and still the usual suspects say it isn't so and if it is so we aren't to blame and if we are to blame there nothing we can do about it !!! Endlessly .

We can do something .Reduce our energy consumption and our embodied energy consumption by half .Each personally .I have ,it's taken 3 years of changes .Push for legislative change .Treat it as a threat to the your country and its life ..not lifestyle ...thats just shorthand for consumption.

George.
04-08-2007, 09:52 AM
And then there is the tropical fish trade. Species after species becoming rare, large areas bleached... affects rivers and lakes too.

WX
04-08-2007, 07:05 PM
Said Hanrahan

"We'll all be rooned," said Hanrahan,
In accents most forlorn,
Outside the church, ere Mass began,
One frosty Sunday morn.

The congregation stood about,
Coat-collars to the ears,
And talked of stock, and crops, and drought,
As it had done for years.

"It's looking crook," said Daniel Croke;
"Bedad, it's cruke, me lad,
For never since the banks went broke
Has seasons been so bad."

"It's dry, all right," said young O'Neil,
With which astute remark
He squatted down upon his heel
And chewed a piece of bark.

And so around the chorus ran
"It's keepin' dry, no doubt."
"We'll all be rooned," said Hanrahan,
"Before the year is out."

"The crops are done; ye'll have your work
To save one bag of grain;
From here way out to Back-o'-Bourke
They're singin' out for rain.

"They're singin' out for rain," he said,
"And all the tanks are dry."
The congregation scratched its head,
And gazed around the sky.

"There won't be grass, in any case,
Enough to feed an ass;
There's not a blade on Casey's place
As I came down to Mass."

"If rain don't come this month," said Dan,
And cleared his throat to speak --
"We'll all be rooned," said Hanrahan,
"If rain don't come this week."

A heavy silence seemed to steal
On all at this remark;
And each man squatted on his heel,
And chewed a piece of bark.

"We want an inch of rain, we do,"
O'Neil observed at last;
But Croke "maintained" we wanted two
To put the danger past.

"If we don't get three inches, man,
Or four to break this drought,
We'll all be rooned," said Hanrahan,
"Before the year is out."

In God's good time down came the rain;
And all the afternoon
On iron roof and window-pane
It drummed a homely tune.

And through the night it pattered still,
And lightsome, gladsome elves
On dripping spout and window-sill
Kept talking to themselves.

It pelted, pelted all day long,
A-singing at its work,
Till every heart took up the song
Way out to Back-o'-Bourke.

And every creek a banker ran,
And dams filled overtop;
"We'll all be rooned," said Hanrahan,
"If this rain doesn't stop."

And stop it did, in God's good time;
And spring came in to fold
A mantle o'er the hills sublime
Of green and pink and gold.

And days went by on dancing feet,
With harvest-hopes immense,
And laughing eyes beheld the wheat
Nid-nodding o'er the fence.

And, oh, the smiles on every face,
As happy lad and lass
Through grass knee-deep on Casey's place
Went riding down to Mass.

While round the church in clothes genteel
Discoursed the men of mark,
And each man squatted on his heel,
And chewed his piece of bark.

"There'll be bush-fires for sure, me man,
There will, without a doubt;
We'll all be rooned," said Hanrahan,
"Before the year is out."

-- John O'Brien