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Dave B
03-31-2007, 11:34 PM
Does anyone have strong recommendations for a small cook top for a cuddy cabin? We probably wouldnt' be staying overnight for more than 2-3 days at the most, but it would be nice to be able to heat coffee or soup. I'm guessing a single burner would be fine.

I've been looking at the Origo alcohol burners that pop up on Ebay and they certainly look simple and safe. Another option would be to just buy a typical camping stove that uses the small propane bottles. I'm sure there are other options as well.

Any ideas?

paladin
04-01-2007, 12:32 AM
If you can find one.......the old sea swing single burner with the pump up kerosene burner, the propane one would be a substitute other wise. Carry a couple or three large thermos, the types that are stainless steel and with a wide mouth. You can heat boiling water in one with tea or coffee bags seal the lid, toss it under a pillow on the settee.....you can cook bacon, then scrambled or whatever eggs, and make toast on the single burner....you can start a pot of soup, get everything bubbly boiling and put it in the big thermos, and in 4-5 hours, theres supper.....

Jay Greer
04-01-2007, 12:42 AM
One of the advantages of a solid fuel burning stove aboard a boat is that it will drive dampness out of the cabin or cuddy even on a late summer afternoon sail or when hunkered down in a snug cove. The moisture goes up the stack and the cast iron body of the small stove keeps all within at a comfortable temperature. I can highly recommend the manufacurer of these products.
http://www.marinestove.com/index.htm
Halcyon Days,
Jay Greer

Dave B
04-01-2007, 12:53 AM
I haven't heard of a "Sea Swing" brand and so I'll have to do a little research. I definitely don't have room for a regular stove like Jay mentions, although I'd love to have one. This will be a tiny cabin and I'll be lucky to have room for a single burner.

rbgarr
04-01-2007, 12:55 AM
Butane camp stoves like you'd get at an REI might do well.

Dave B
04-01-2007, 01:18 AM
OK, a little Google search and now I know what a "sea swing" is. Force 10 has a Seacook stove model 82000 that fits the bill.

Canoeyawl
04-01-2007, 02:05 AM
These portable butane stoves are great.
http://www.microtorch.net/prodimages/Stove/BS1502AIs.jpg
http://www.microtorch.net/products.asp?cat=15

George Ray
04-01-2007, 02:44 AM
Force 10 sea swing:
Getting hard to find and I am not sure who is making them now. The older version out of cast alum would hold a bigger pot and it is no longer made. The stainless version shown has all the virtues listed by Paladin but only holds small (?8"?) pots. The current Force 10 web site does not show them but they appear on some vendors websites.
http://ca.binnacle.com/product_info.php?cPath=7_256&products_id=2515
http://ca.binnacle.com/images/mainimages/24600.jpg

Check out James Baldwins own 'sea swing' type design. He was selling these at one time and may do so again.
http://atomvoyages.com/projects/AtomStove.htm
http://atomvoyages.com/images/AtomNewStove01kb50.jpg

StevenBauer
04-01-2007, 03:42 AM
Here's the cast aluminum version, this one was set up for sterno, I think:

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r241/bauerdad/Ostkust/IMG_0388.jpg

S.V. Airlie
04-01-2007, 05:27 AM
This is gonna go the other way. The Alcohol stove on Uncas worked fairly well. I mean everyone got fed right. Orego makes them. A bit pricey but as you won't be spending too many overnights on board in a row, it should work fine. And it is a 2 burner.

pss.. I mention getting a two burner as I suspect one burner is not gonna be enough.
At least with two, you don't have to eat stew all of the time.
Also, some of those signle burners would be difficult to put a frying pan on. At least the gimbaled ones...

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
04-01-2007, 07:18 AM
These (http://www.jetboil.com/) pack small and cook efficiently - gaining in popularity.

The shiny brass kerosene jobs are best suited to enthusiasts who already know how to use them.

MarkC
04-01-2007, 09:58 AM
Go Alcohol (Ethanol/Methanol)

The Maxi pressurised 2 burner with grill. Simple to use after some practice.

Or the Origo system (unpressurised) sold by Electolux. The simplest of all stoves but quite an attractive unit.

kc8pql
04-01-2007, 10:05 AM
Here's the cast aluminum version, this one was set up for sterno, I think:

Someone gave me one a Sea Swing like the one pictured. I assumed it used Sterno but wasn't sure. Does the "chimney" just sit on top of the Sterno can?

alkorn
04-01-2007, 10:08 AM
An outfit called St. Paut Mercantile ( http://www.stpaulmercantile.com/buttrfly.htm ) sells various kerosene stoves that I'm guessing are manufactured in China for third-world markets. They're inexpensive but look effective, and kerosene is safer in your cabin than propane. They all seem to be made of painted steel, so occasional re-painting would be necessary for them to survive in a salt-air environment.

http://www.stpaulmercantile.com/2648big.jpg

Dave B
04-01-2007, 02:13 PM
Lots of good ideas and I appreciate it!

I stumbled across this which also makes the sea swing idea portable. http://www.tritonclass.org/mir/236stove.html

The Force 10 Seacook seems to be made by another company now and it's still available, but not in aluminum.

Lew Barrett
04-01-2007, 03:10 PM
For just infrequent use I'd be inclined to use one of those little butane cookers that Canoe Yawl is talking about. The butane bottles are spendy for long term cooking, but for infrequent use, making coffee of heating a can of soup they are fine and very convenient. Butane is no muss, and comes in small enough packages to not be a storage issue on board a small boat. Very handy and efficient.I used one for years.

JimConlin
04-01-2007, 04:32 PM
There was an article in Practical Sailor a while back. IIRC, they preferred the small butane jobs. They're quite inexpensive, a fraction of the cost of the single-burner Origo. To me, the sea-swing types look fine for cooking underway, but unwieldy otherwise.

paladin
04-01-2007, 04:42 PM
You will find alcohol difficult to obtain unless you are making extended daysails from a location that sells it. I had a Kenyon alcohol stove the first time around and hated the smell and the time it took to actually cook or boil water. The pressurized oil makes more sense for extended runs.

The chinese one...
http://www.stpaulmercantile.com/2648big.jpg
..if needed repainted, could use the hi-temp exhaust pipe paint to keep it from rusting.

Les Schuldt
04-01-2007, 05:59 PM
Dave,

If you're not cooking underway, you probably don't need a swinging stove.

I used an Origo for a number of years for weekend trips. Not huge BTUs, but quiet and simple. No pressurization means no flare-ups. You can keep the alcohol safely in a aluminum bottle. If there were an accident, alcohol extinguishes with a bucket of water.

It'll fry and egg, make a cup of coffee, heat a can of soup. What more does a sailor need?

-Les

S.V. Airlie
04-01-2007, 06:18 PM
I used one too Les.( for 10 years ). I never had a problem with it. Chuck says alcohol is hard to find. I've not had that problem...

paladin
04-01-2007, 06:24 PM
look at my qualifier, Jamie......you're nuthing but a coastwise huggin' logjam......go somewhere else....waaaaaay offshore.....THEN try to find a lot of the goodies that you are accustomed to....and take lotsa green stuff with you.......same thing with propane...everyone watns to sell you a bottle.ot refill yours, or if they exchange it they will give you an old rusty one for your nice one.....and many areas have hteir own special fittings so that they don't refill yours...so ya gotta buy theirs......:D

S.V. Airlie
04-01-2007, 06:27 PM
Gee thanks Chuck. ;)
You clarified it. But I would also think that any system you have that requires fuel would be hard to acquire if one is way off shore...

paladin
04-01-2007, 06:35 PM
Just trying to be helpful , Jamie.....mighty tempted to crack the Glenfiddich.....I just broke a gold crown and ain't happy.......gotta find some painkiller until manana......:D

S.V. Airlie
04-01-2007, 06:37 PM
Ouch on the gold crown... Ya gotta stop twisting off bottle tops with your teeth Chuck.

NuSKcalB
04-01-2007, 06:55 PM
I can vouch that these are indeed 'great' we use one in the shop to boil up our pinetar - the potstand is very sturdy (as indeed is the whole unit) and it very efficently boiled up around 18 litres of pinetar.

Wal-Mart were doing a special on these at the end of last camping season so possibly the best time to buy one (or a pair!!)

NuS



These portable butane stoves are great.
http://www.microtorch.net/prodimages/Stove/BS1502AIs.jpg
http://www.microtorch.net/products.asp?cat=15

Lew Barrett
04-01-2007, 07:13 PM
I can vouch that these are indeed 'great' we use one in the shop to boil up our pinetar - the potstand is very sturdy (as indeed is the whole unit) and it very efficently boiled up around 18 litres of pinetar.
NuS


Most people I know that have an oil fired oven, say an Olympic or the like, keep one of those on board for pot cooking, coffee and saute work. I had exactly that setup on my last boat and as I said, it proved completely satisfactory. For a small weekender, it would be hard to improve upon without spending five times the money. Much faster cooking than alcohol, and without the trouble of kero.

merlinron
04-01-2007, 07:29 PM
there are lots of different styles of propane cookers that use the little 2 lb. bottles marketed by coleman. i have both a single burner and a more conventional looking 2 burner.

i think the single burner would be ideal for your situation. the burner simply screws onto the top of the bottle and the bottle sits tightly into a base. i use one of these in a ice fishing shanty and it will heat the shanty on it's lowest setting for about 8 hrs as well. i built a small folding counter that swings down from a wall and has a hole in it the diameter of the coleman bottle with a bottom that puts the burner about 4 inches off the counter surface. it is secure as can be and will cook anything that a regular stove will. i plan in using this same system in my boat when it comes time.

S.V. Airlie
04-01-2007, 07:34 PM
Merlin..
Ya just can't cook much on a one burner. Granted, if ya like canned dinners and only have to heat them up.. one pot cooking okay.. but.. I like to have coffee in the morning and eats.. one burner just won't do it for me.
And then.. of course, I like to cook.

perhaps this is being addressed backwards.. Think cooking habits first and then stoves.

StevenBauer
04-01-2007, 07:54 PM
I think the ultimate onboard stove is the Wallas. They run on diesel or kerosene and have no exposed flame - all exhaust gasses vent to the outside. The fuel heats up a cast iron plate. There is also a fan that mounts on top to use it as a cabin heater. I've only seen the single burner unit but they also make a double and ones with ovens.

http://www.kuranda.co.uk/Wallas_800.jpg

http://www.kuranda.co.uk/87D.jpg

www.kuranda.co.uk/wallas_index.html

NuSKcalB
04-01-2007, 09:10 PM
What's the boat here Steve? Looks like a Folkboat.....

NuS



Here's the cast aluminum version, this one was set up for sterno, I think:

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r241/bauerdad/Ostkust/IMG_0388.jpg

StevenBauer
04-01-2007, 09:18 PM
My new (to me) Ostkust Sloop. Designed by Al Mason in 1944. Mahogany on W. Oak. Built in 1959 by Joel Johnson in Bridgeport Conn.

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r241/bauerdad/Ostkust/IMG_0385.jpg

There was a thread last week with lots more pics.

www.woodenboatvb.com/vbulletin/upload/showthread.php?t=63184

rbgarr
04-01-2007, 11:04 PM
You really had to block her up high to use those jackstands you got, didn't you? Maybe it works out well that way with the hydraulic trailer.

jimmy
04-02-2007, 03:04 PM
I did a lot of research while trying to decide what to replace my 2 burner + oven pressure kerosene stove. I decided to go with the one burner Origo 1500 and plan to add a sea swing type stove if I find that one burner isn't enough, however, I suspect that the one burner will be fine for most of my expected use which is day sailing, weekends, and a few trips of about a week. I've tested the Origo at home and it is a HUGE improvement over pressure kerosene. I know some people swear by pressure kerosene and that is great because I will want to sell my old stove soon. I think one of those self contained single burner propane of butane stoves might be OK as well, although not as safe. I definately wouldn't use one of the pressure camping stoves that uses white gas/coleman fuel. Alcohol isn't as expensive as people make it out to be. Unless you live on your boat or cruise extensively the difference in fuel cost will be small compared to the cost of the stove. Here 4L costs $10 Canadian and you can get it at any hardware store (it probably costs double at most marine stores).

S.V. Airlie
04-02-2007, 04:24 PM
Jimmy.. let me get this right! You are gonna buy a one burner.. Origo.. One burner isn't cheap. Then, if it is not enough, you are gonna buy a separate stove to take care of the overflow. Now the price dif. between a one burner and a two burner origo is what 100.00. Doesn't it just make sense to buy a 2 burner.?

jimmy
04-02-2007, 04:47 PM
You're not giving me much credit. Without going into detail about my galley I will just say that a seaswing will both look better and be safer than the second burner of a 2 burner origo sticking 10" out over the edge of the counter. So no, it doesn't make sense to buy a 2 burner.

PS. I mentioned I don't expect to need to sea swing stove and if I do I will wait until I can find a deal on one.

S.V. Airlie
04-02-2007, 05:03 PM
Naw.. nothing to do with credit or lack thereof. I don't or didn't have any idea of the space you were dealing with.
Hence, my question. Which you answered.

merlinron
04-02-2007, 07:01 PM
as inexpensive and small as they are, thre's no reason a guy couldn't have 2 of them mounted on a small swing down counter. i've been camping and used2 of them together, under a large cast-iron frying pan and under a large flat heavy skillet. the key is to set the flame low so the heat is not concetrated in 2 spots and use a heavy pan/skillet. it takes a few minutes longer to get up to temp, but once there it works great.

beutiful boat, steve!!

willmarsh3
04-03-2007, 08:59 AM
Good thread.

I have a two burner Origo and like it except...

1) The alcohol evaporates from the stove when not used for a long time. I just put enough in to cook one meal each time I use it.

2) The alcohol is sometimes restricted e.g. Walmart only allows me to buy 1 quart at a time.

S.V. Airlie
04-03-2007, 09:04 AM
Will.... do you have the pads that go over the burners well, the cannisters? If not, you can get them cheap... They help a lot with the problem of evaporation.
Just don't put them on immediately after putting the flame out.:eek::eek:

johngsandusky
04-03-2007, 01:14 PM
Someone asked about sterno. In my experience it's not hot enough to cook over on a cool day. I like propane or butane. Hot, clean, convenient. Use camp stoves that are enameled, they hold up fine.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
04-03-2007, 01:23 PM
There are lots of potential answers
http://i44.photobucket.com/albums/f13/zemio1/freshccs.jpg
(about $15 from a huge range of third world countries)

Someone was selling these beauts for $54 recently - burns kero, white gas or ethanol on demand.
http://spiritburner.com/collectors_galleries/monte_dodge/images/squareblueoptimus.jpg

willmarsh3
04-03-2007, 02:36 PM
Will.... do you have the pads that go over the burners well, the cannisters? If not, you can get them cheap... They help a lot with the problem of evaporation.
Just don't put them on immediately after putting the flame out.:eek::eek:

Actually I don't. I know exactly what you are talking about. And I agree they help. Can you tell me where you can get them cheap? It's been one of my (lower priority) boat project items. In my previous boat I bought an Origo stove to replace one of the pressurized alcohol primus type that leaked and was very difficult to start. That one had the rubber circle pads.

paladin
04-03-2007, 03:51 PM
I think you are refferring to Flame Tamers.....they spread the flame to keep hot spots off the pots.......also use them when you put the little toaster thingy over the burner.....

Bob (oh, THAT Bob)
04-03-2007, 04:01 PM
The following are great and fold down to the size of your fist, but are very powerful burners, thus are very versatile for onshore excursions as well. However, they are not as stable as the larger stoves. But one would make a great basis for a gimbled stove.

I love the multifuel backpacking/mountaineering stoves, they run off white gas (Coleman fuel), gasoline, or kerosene (so you don't need a separate fuel aboard like alcohol, though the alcohol stoves are supposed to be safer aboard boats). Great for travel or emergencies. There are many but I favor the Optimus Nova, ruggedly constructed, it primes better than the rest, it will will roar at 10,000 btu or simmer down to a candle flame, it has a metal pump instead of plastic like on the MSRs (below), and it has a air-line-style quick disconnect fuel line which swivels and lets you tip over the fuel bottle a minute before finishing so the line gets purged of liquid fuel. It used to be imported by Brunton but they seem to have replaced it with the Brunton Vapor which changed the leg design which I don't like (though the vapor will ALSO run off of butane canisters, but I never use them, as liquid fuels are vastly more economical and lighter (higher fuel density), so this feature is useless to me. This is the old version I like:

http://www.backpacker.com/article/1,2646,1971,00.html

http://store.everestgear.com/eqbrn700.html

http://www.rei.com/product/752658

http://www.rei.com/REI-Outlet/product/758705
(ON CLEARANCE NOW, 44% OFF, AND WITH A FUEL BOTTLE, SUPER DEAL!)

(When I bought mine at REI, it came with a fuel bottle; Now, they don't on the '07 models, not sure why, and REI doesn't carry the Optimus bottles, but the MSR and Primus bottles that they do carry are the same threads and work fine I believe.)

This is the Brunton Vapor, I don't like the changes:

http://www.brunton.com/product.php?id=428

The MSR Dragonfly has a similar burner design so is also great, I just liked other features on the Nova like the quick disconnect fuel line and the serrated pot surface. But here is the Dragonfly:

http://www.msrcorp.com/stoves/dragonfly.asp

http://www.rei.com/online/store/Prod...t =REI_SEARCH

ALSO: MSR (Mountain Safety Research) and others make HANGING mountaineering stoves, the mountain climbers like to hang them inside the tent, so these may be good in a boat, IF the swinging motion is not too severe. The gimbled boat stoves may be better damped, not sure.

http://www.rei.com/product/734596


Bob

jimmy
04-03-2007, 05:34 PM
Those are the camp stoves I would recommend NOT using. That's just my personal opinion of course. I have the MSR Dragonfly and tried it on my boat (outside) a couple of times when I first got my boat and I feel lucky I didn't catch my boat on fire (I came close). They're made for using outside, preferably on the ground. I don't think it's safe to use them inside a tent either.

oakman
04-04-2007, 07:47 PM
Not great at the pic thing but check out this, a cut above the sea swing in alum.

http://www.forespar.com/onlineCatalog/2007/Sailboat/34sailing_miniGalley2007.shtml

Bob Cleek
04-04-2007, 09:13 PM
Mention was made above regarding the clear advantage of solid fuel stoves. The complaint was size. They ARE available. For a simple solution to the damp below, cabin heat, and even cooking if you are so inclined, nothing beats the cost/benefit analysis of a Fatsco Tiny Tot! This marine stove, which burns wood, coal, charcoal or whatever other solid fuel you may have (cut up tires?) will set you back a whole $153.00, and that's for the stainless steel marine version! (These were originally designed for ice fishing shacks!) Been around forever.

http://www.fatscostoves.com/images/brochure.pdf

OR, if you are really some kind of sucker, check out this fraud on eBay!

http://cgi.ebay.com/Tiny-Tot-Stove-ANTIQUE-1890-WORTH-635-NO-RESERVE_W0QQitemZ160101733813QQcategoryZ12QQcmdZVi ewItem

Less than a day left to spend $635 on this rusted out POS, and note the grate is shot! Only on eBay! Let the buyer beware.

Canoeyawl
04-04-2007, 10:02 PM
Good call, Bob Ö
William Gardenís old Bullfrog had one of these Tiny Tot stoves.
I had an opportunity to cruise that boat for a week and the stove was indeed a joy.
We stayed up late telling lies and drinking Port wine, then cooked bacon and eggs in the morning.
We used boat yard scraps and charcoal briquettes for fuel.

Bob (oh, THAT Bob)
04-08-2007, 12:34 PM
Those are the camp stoves I would recommend NOT using. That's just my personal opinion of course. I have the MSR Dragonfly and tried it on my boat (outside) a couple of times when I first got my boat and I feel lucky I didn't catch my boat on fire (I came close). They're made for using outside, preferably on the ground. I don't think it's safe to use them inside a tent either.

You responded to my post, and honestly, I can't disagree with you, there are reasons they used alcohol stoves on boats for years versus white gas or kerosene (until propane stove became more common). I am a lot more comfortable with the Optimus Nova, it primes much easier than my old Whisperlite Internationale, no flare-ups, but an alcohol stove would be safer. I used to have a stove called a Safesport, basically a non-disposable version of sterno, no moving parts, runs off methanol or 92% and over isopropyl alcohol, but no flame adjustability (also would take 3 times as long to boil water, and wouldn't operate at high altitude). But idiot proof and safe. I sent it to my mom in Florida for hurricane season. You can make the same design dirt cheap, just look up "beverage can stove" on wikipedia.org.

You're also right, you're not supposed to use any stove inside a tent, both for fire danger and asphyxiation, but in a bad storm, everybody does, unless the tent has a sheltered vestibule to cook in. I place it on a fireproof platform and my tent is very well ventilated. Although there is still a pinhole in the floor of my tent where I dropped a match while lighting the stove ten years ago.

The Gentleman Sawyer
04-08-2007, 07:53 PM
Don't ya'll have CO concerns about using stoves without oxygen sensors? There are several small, two burner Coleman stoves, intended for outdoor use, that I would use but can't get past the CO worry.

Ken

Gary E
04-08-2007, 08:50 PM
For once in while use I used STERNO...
a little can of it burned for hours and was real simple..

Do they still make it ?

paladin
04-08-2007, 10:21 PM
The little Adriatic by Dickinson is a very nice cooking device, especially if there's a lady involved, and that particular lady sometimes likes to cook......I rarely used more than two burners and the oven on occassion, some ladies just fall all over themselves if you have what can pass as a nice bathroom and a decent kitchen...

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid225/p0c1d832be25eaeefa060c49ba3043ec0/ea012b06.jpg

JimD
04-09-2007, 04:53 AM
For once in while use I used STERNO...
a little can of it burned for hours and was real simple..

Do they still make it ?

http://www.sterno.com/

Dave Hadfield
04-09-2007, 08:34 AM
Hey, those cheap chinese stoves are very interesting. They get their heat by using lots of wicks -- up to 14 of them for a 9000 BTU burner. Wicks are simple.

Anybody tried them? What about the smell?

Bob (oh, THAT Bob)
04-10-2007, 01:35 PM
Don't ya'll have CO concerns about using stoves without oxygen sensors? There are several small, two burner Coleman stoves, intended for outdoor use, that I would use but can't get past the CO worry.

Ken

It's true, carbon monoxide is definitely a concern for a stove running on petrol, kerosene, white gas, or propane, you would need to have the cabin well ventilated in some way while running the stove. Not just a little ventilated like for sleeping, but well ventilated. The alcohol stoves say they don't put out any toxic gases, so I'm not sure about CO; I thought any burning hydrocarbon produces CO.

I really love white gas stoves. The only flareups are during priming, and that happens rarely with increased experience. Even then, I could blow them out with my own breath. Once they are running I don't get any flareups, at least with the optimus nova. I like the newer designs with the fuel bottle separate from the burner (not underneath), the fuel always stays cool, and you can use a baking cover ("Outback Oven"). Burns very hot on full blast, boils a liter of water in 3.5-4 minutes at sea level. Economy is an issue for me, a gallon of white gas, at $5 a gallon, will power the Nova at full blast (10,000 BTU) for 12 *hours*. A $4 isobutane canister will provide only 35 *minutes* of output at similar heat output level. White gas costs pennies per meal, butane a buck (short cook time, just bringing to boil.) And I hate that the butane canisters are non-refillable, so more junk in the landfills, or at least more energy to melt down and recycle; Not an issue with liquid fuel stoves. The Optimus Nova and the MSR liquid fuel stoves are made from stainless steel and brass, I haven't exposed any to salt water but I think they'll hold up as well as any, most critical issue would be the tiny fuel jet orifice, but they all come with a cleaning needle.

Sterno is incredibly slow to heat things, not sure if it will even boil water as the flame itself is below boiling temp (205 F, about 96 C?) according to sterno website, it's really designed for warming chafing dishes at a buffet table.

When I had my safesport stove, it recommended denatured alchohol (ethanol), but I frequently used isopropyl ("rubbing") alcohol that was over 92% concentration, even better when I could find 99% (Safeway supermarket sells it). Isopropyl alcohol is much cheaper than denatured alcohol at the hardware store, but I think it does product more fumes, but I always used it outdoors.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
04-10-2007, 04:23 PM
I too like white gas stoves - but only where you can "Secure the line of retreat" - they have a variety of truly spectacular failure modes - of which the famous MSR plastic pump breakage is pretty typical - anyone else own a Borde?

If you're interested in the CO issue - http://spiritburner.com/backpacker_stove_safety.htm.

Fritz Koschmann
04-10-2007, 09:53 PM
I installed a Kenyon Kiss single burner butane cartridge stove. It is set in the countertop. The stove was installed with the idea that when our diesel range wasn't operating or if a quicker flame was needed it would be handy. I notice that the stove is no longer available and I think I know why. The stove fires up readily and the heat output is good for a minute or two but then dwindles to almost nothing. If you check the cartridge when the flame has gone down it is extremely cold, something to do with the expansion of gas. Anyway the stove is next to useless and Kenyon was no help. I will be removing the stove and putting a cutting board in the hole.

zenda
04-14-2007, 07:41 PM
I think the ultimate onboard stove is the Wallas. They run on diesel or kerosene and have no exposed flame - all exhaust gasses vent to the outside. The fuel heats up a cast iron plate. There is also a fan that mounts on top to use it as a cabin heater. I've only seen the single burner unit but they also make a double and ones with ovens.

http://www.kuranda.co.uk/Wallas_800.jpg

http://www.kuranda.co.uk/87D.jpg

www.kuranda.co.uk/wallas_index.html
Steven,
Thanks for the info. All I could find in diesel was the Dickinson, and the Wallas has twice the fuel efficiency. Could you expand on your endorsement a bit?

zenda
04-14-2007, 07:42 PM
Hey, those cheap chinese stoves are very interesting. They get their heat by using lots of wicks -- up to 14 of them for a 9000 BTU burner. Wicks are simple.

Anybody tried them? What about the smell?
We used one for a year, on land in Sumatra, and alot of people over there use them. They're simple and cheap, but I wouldn't know about their durability in a marine environment.

zenda
04-26-2007, 02:49 PM
I think the ultimate onboard stove is the Wallas. They run on diesel or kerosene and have no exposed flame - all exhaust gasses vent to the outside. The fuel heats up a cast iron plate. There is also a fan that mounts on top to use it as a cabin heater. I've only seen the single burner unit but they also make a double and ones with ovens.

http://www.kuranda.co.uk/Wallas_800.jpg

http://www.kuranda.co.uk/87D.jpg

www.kuranda.co.uk/wallas_index.html

I would be very grateful for remarks from any of you that have used Wallas stoves in the past. This Wallas seems like the best option for my particular needs, but there's no substitute for real world experience.

JimConlin
04-26-2007, 03:22 PM
I have a similar need and recently came across a little butane job at a local restaurant supply shop. The stove, with a case, was about $22 and a case of butane cartridges was under $20. Cheap. If it works well, i can afford to toss it when it rusts.

Dave Hadfield
04-28-2007, 10:29 AM
For 9 seasons we used a Coleman 2 burner. It can be fueled by the little throw-away propane canisters, but I used a 5 lb refillable bottle, which I could easily detach and stow out of the cabin.

It worked great. Hot as hell, and the stove cost about $60.

Coleman has parts available everywhere. Also, they have a collapseable oven, a tin box, which sits on a burner and allows you to bake stuff -- wonderful on a clammy day.

S.V. Airlie
04-28-2007, 11:53 AM
I used a 5 lb refillable bottle, which I could easily detach and stow out of the cabin.

Not sure the coastguard would approve.. Dave...

Audasea
04-28-2007, 12:17 PM
Interesting thread. I have a one burner Origo and have not had much problems heating or cooking with it. It does boil water quickly, and will burn anything if cranked up. How hot do you need it? I'm not out that much, but a gallon of fuel would last me all year. West Marine for genuine "boat fuel", but any hardware store sells the same stuff or similar enough you can't tell the difference (denatured alcohol) at half the cost. Slow comes from only having one burner. You do notice the odor, but you get used to it.

I've thought of using the Coleman stoves, we used them with the Scouts and they work great. I have two of them and I have the oven. What I don't have is a pot holder arrangement to keep pots and pans on the burner while underway or even in a "rolly" anchorage. I'd want a modified pot holder like the one Jim Baldwin built for his single burner stove. Perhaps some sort of cage or addition to set on the grate to keep a pot from flying off.

I don't think I would ever consider using one of the backpacker stoves. To unstable for a boat. (I have about 4 different types).

A fire on any type of boat would probably ruin your day, so that would be my #1 concern, folllowed by keeping the pot on the burner and whatever is in the pot in the pot.

StevenBauer
07-22-2007, 09:27 PM
Way back in post #9 of this thread I showed the old cast aluminum Sea Swing sterno stove that came with my boat. Not really wanting to use sterno I picked up a tiny little backpacking stove to try to fit in it instead. It was just a little too tall. I'd either have to cut off the little foldout arms that normally would hold the pan or else cut the hole in the cast aluminum bigger. Talking about this with fellow forumite Mark (TD) we realized we wouldn't have to cut the whole hole bigger, just make four notches in the base so the new stove will fit. With the arms in the notches it actually locks the stove in place. We tried it out this afternoon. :) After a couple of hours sailing around the bay, while headed back to the mooring field, we brewed up a nice pot of coffee. :D

Here are the notches:

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r241/bauerdad/Ostkust/IMG_1116.jpg

And here is the stove and our pot of coffee:

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r241/bauerdad/Ostkust/IMG_1118.jpg

The gimbal action was perfect, though we did keep a constant watch on it the whole time.

Steven

Concordia...41
07-22-2007, 11:35 PM
The Sea Swing as pictured

http://ca.binnacle.com/images/mainimages/24600.jpg

is the ticket. Simple. Easy. Practical.

The boat I crewed on for the delivery I did May/June has one. I did 19 days, cooking 3 meals a day (except when in port), for 2-3 people. Plus coffee, tea, and hot chocolate at regular intervals.

One dish things are a breeze, but getting a full meal on the table with everything still HOT was a challenge. :eek: :eek: :rolleyes:

Breakfast = eggs, potatoes, meat, and bread (for three). Quite a challenge with an 8" burner. :D

This little gizzy do makes toast:

http://www.campmor.com/images/acc/23102.jpg

but it is the only accessory I found.

One boat I know - but haven't crewed on has two of the Sea Swings. One is mounted high like Steven's - probably for coffee and the like, but two side by side - or within juggling distance - would be more practical for meals.

The propane tanks are readily available and it really is no mess - no fuss - no weight - little expense.

goodbasil
03-26-2011, 09:39 PM
Didn't some one do a thing on making your own swinging, one burner stove recently? Tin H., or James M., I think.

goodbasil
03-26-2011, 09:53 PM
Okay, it was Jame McMullen. (Can't even edit now.) Just did some searching, the thread has been removed for whatever reason.

Jay Greer
03-27-2011, 12:32 AM
Any heat source or stove within a closed cabin space that is not vented will create moisture as well as poisonous fumes. I rally prefer a vented stove for this reason.
Fatsco stoves.
http://www.fatscostoves.com/
or Skippy Stoves by Shipmate , http://www.shipmatestove.com/
are very appropriate for a small cuddy.
Also, the Navigator Stove Co. produces a n exemplary product as well.
http://www.marinestove.com/
So here are three choices for comfort and dry warmth without worry.
Jay

mike hanyi
03-27-2011, 02:32 AM
my new (to me) ostkust sloop. Designed by al mason in 1944. Mahogany on w. Oak. Built in 1959 by joel johnson in bridgeport conn.

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r241/bauerdad/ostkust/img_0385.jpg

there was a thread last week with lots more pics.

www.woodenboatvb.com/vbulletin/upload/showthread.php?t=63184

hey steven; how about painting the garage first!!!

farwesthoops
03-27-2011, 11:15 PM
One burner isn't enough for you? How about using a pair of Sea Swings? I have a Force Ten propane as well as an old Sea Swing with a Primus 100 mounted in it. Great stoves both at the dock and underway. Scout the second marine/consignment sores. Buy one now; one later. Give or take $100 ea I'd guess. Picked up my Primus from a nice guy on CL for $60 this past Fall. Incidently, the newer Force Tens will not take an 8" pot or pressure cooker unfortunately.