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donald branscom
03-22-2007, 04:21 PM
I have just applied the first and most diffacult sheet of marine plywood to my 19 boat frame. And it WAS extreme torture.
Photos on this post before 3pm today.

donald branscom
03-22-2007, 04:50 PM
I have just applied the first and most diffacult sheet of marine plywood to my 19 boat frame. And it WAS extreme torture.
Photos on this post before 3pm today.
http://i14.tinypic.com/2aa0zdk.jpg
http://i14.tinypic.com/2aa0zdk.jpg

The designer sure put me thru some hell just for a little style. wow
Glad to see that first panel on after this cold damp winter and not getting much done.Lots of scalding HOT water- and another inch to go.

donald branscom
03-22-2007, 05:00 PM
I have just applied the first and most diffacult sheet of marine plywood to my 19 boat frame. And it WAS extreme torture.
Photos on this post before 3pm today. Thats PST zone.

TerryLL
03-22-2007, 05:21 PM
Looks gnarly. What boat are you building, who is the designer, and how thick is that plywood??

The best, Terry

kc8pql
03-22-2007, 06:48 PM
I would usually start fastening at the bow, or the area of the most sever curve, and work back toward midship/less curve. That way the worst part is fastened before the major stress is put on the piece. It's easier to bend that way.

donald branscom
03-22-2007, 07:48 PM
Looks gnarly. What boat are you building, who is the designer, and how thick is that plywood??

The best, Terry
This is a drawing I made of the boat as it shows on the plans.
The plans are black and white and i got them on the internet thru D.N. Goodchild. It says "a shellbacks Library Idea Booklet" on the front but no designer is given. The plan description said 19 foot cruising sailboat. The plywood is 3/8 marine plywood.
http://i9.tinypic.com/2ytsd8x.jpg
http://i9.tinypic.com/2ytsd8x.jpg
It has a centerboard but i am thinking of putting a fixed keel on it.

paladin
03-22-2007, 08:46 PM
looks like a lot of rudder for the boat.....

TerryLL
03-22-2007, 09:20 PM
I checked out the plans online. Wanted to get a look at the forfoot, but the body plan was not shown, and the construction plan didn't clearly show that area. The plans did mention plywood, so I'll assume the design can be built in plywood. That fir plywood you are using is pretty darn stiff, and might not be the best choice for this hull.

If you absolutely cannot get that last inch to suck down you have a couple of options:

1. Go with a more flexible plywood in the same thickness, like okoume marine.
2. Plank the forebottom in two or more layers with thinner stock, with a generous layer of thickened epoxy between layers.

Planking in two layers will eliminate all that stress that is being built into the forefoot, and will practically eliminate the possibility the forfoot planking will spring open.

The best, Terry

donald branscom
03-23-2007, 12:25 PM
I checked out the plans online. Wanted to get a look at the forfoot, but the body plan was not shown, and the construction plan didn't clearly show that area. The plans did mention plywood, so I'll assume the design can be built in plywood. That fir plywood you are using is pretty darn stiff, and might not be the best choice for this hull.

If you absolutely cannot get that last inch to suck down you have a couple of options:

1. Go with a more flexible plywood in the same thickness, like okoume marine.
2. Plank the forebottom in two or more layers with thinner stock, with a generous layer of thickened epoxy between layers.

Planking in two layers will eliminate all that stress that is being built into the forefoot, and will practically eliminate the possibility the forfoot planking will spring open.

The best, Terry

Thanks Terry LL,

Went out this morning and attacked the problem. It seemed much more cooperative. Finished it.

JimD
03-23-2007, 12:39 PM
I would usually start fastening at the bow, or the area of the most sever curve, and work back toward midship/less curve. That way the worst part is fastened before the major stress is put on the piece. It's easier to bend that way.

This is good advice - for the next boat, eh, Donald? :D (Looking good)

katiedobe
03-23-2007, 01:02 PM
Hey Paladin what is the issue with having a too large rudder?

donald branscom
03-23-2007, 03:11 PM
This is good advice - for the next boat, eh, Donald? :D (Looking good)

NEXT BOAT?!!

donald branscom
03-23-2007, 03:15 PM
This is good advice - for the next boat, eh, Donald? :D (Looking good)

All the bending was between frame #1 and the stem.
I do not have a high enough ceiling for a 10 ft. sheet of ply.
I would have the leverage but it could still break.
I just had to bend a little come back a few hours later and so on...

JimD
03-23-2007, 03:23 PM
...I do not have a high enough ceiling for a 10 ft. sheet of ply...

I figured it was something like that. My Glen-L utility took a similar tight bend and it was a real pain working in a small space.

And whaddaya mean NEXT BOAT??? :D

donald branscom
03-23-2007, 06:38 PM
I figured it was something like that. My Glen-L utility took a similar tight bend and it was a real pain working in a small space.

And whaddaya mean NEXT BOAT??? :D

I only have about a foot on each side of mine to work.
More room near the ends of coarse. But the main idea was that the
boat fit in the garage when finished, and use up the space.

Tom Robb
03-24-2007, 03:08 PM
Years from now when the pain is forgotten, it'll make a good story and when you look at the bow the frustration will seem worth it.

Hot wet towels are reputed to be of some help, as is the above suggestion of starting at the bow where you'd have that long lever of the rest of the plank.