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earling2
02-19-2007, 04:23 PM
I just wondered if anybody out there has any great suggestions for inside hull colors. I'm about done with a Bolger "Defender" -- 11 ft. glued lapstrake tender from Small Boats-- and not seeing anything in Kirby paints that really hits me. I already did a coat of their "cream" in there which seems all wrong (too buttercup yellowy). I just need a nice traditional buff sort of, but a little less orangy -- I know Gannon & Benjamin used to use something called Wheat, from somewhere, which was perfect. (I just called there and Carol Gannon said she thought it was Straw from Dutch Boy, but i'd be reluctant to use Dutch boy). I'm thinking of Kirby "putty" or "taupe" but they look sort of on the drab side.
First experience with CPES, noxious stuff indoors, beware; even with a respirator, headache, runny nose, itchy eyes; even with a fire in the basement woodstove sucking air out, place still got hellishly stinky for a day. It does harden up the surface tremendously and probably does what it says it does. But at what cost? Another miracle of toxicity on the loose . . .
thanks, any ideas

rbgarr
02-19-2007, 04:33 PM
Try Interlux (?) Bristol Beige with some flat white in it.

I always admired Bolger's Defender design. Got any pictures?

boylesboats
02-19-2007, 04:49 PM
I just wondered if anybody out there has any great suggestions for inside hull colors. I'm about done with a Bolger "Defender" -- 11 ft. glued lapstrake tender from Small Boats-- and not seeing anything in Kirby paints that really hits me. I already did a coat of their "cream" in there which seems all wrong (too buttercup yellowy). I just need a nice traditional buff sort of, but a little less orangy -- I know Gannon & Benjamin used to use something called Wheat, from somewhere, which was perfect. (I just called there and Carol Gannon said she thought it was Straw from Dutch Boy, but i'd be reluctant to use Dutch boy). I'm thinking of Kirby "putty" or "taupe" but they look sort of on the drab side.
First experience with CPES, noxious stuff indoors, beware; even with a respirator, headache, runny nose, itchy eyes; even with a fire in the basement woodstove sucking air out, place still got hellishly stinky for a day. It does harden up the surface tremendously and probably does what it says it does. But at what cost? Another miracle of toxicity on the loose . . .
thanks, any ideas
I painted inside all my boat in "Almond", it still clean light color, not as bright as white, look rather classic..
http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p182/boylesboats/0001.jpg

Nicholas Carey
02-19-2007, 04:49 PM
Interlux Brightsides in Hatteras Off-white is a nice color -- a rather pale straw I believe.

boylesboats
02-19-2007, 05:12 PM
Donn,
Those colors you have mentioned sure is easy on eyes in bright sunny days... Yet it still look clean...

earling2
02-19-2007, 05:47 PM
Those are all good colors. I've used Hatteras many times but it's a little lighter than I'd like for this -- lapstrake interior with lots of little crevices for black stuff to sit there
A dinghy gets so grungy... A lot to be said for an oiled inside, not really poss. in a plywood boat . . .
I'll check out the Interlux and Petit charts
dave

earling2
02-19-2007, 05:52 PM
rgbarr --
sorry, I didn't see your question --- oh yeah, lots of photos. I have to figure out how to post them. Imagestation or something . . .?
dave

StevenBauer
02-19-2007, 06:02 PM
Get a sample of the bottom mud around where you'll be launching and have it color matched at your local paint store. Then when the bottom of the boat is all muddy no one will know. :D

Steven

earling2
02-19-2007, 06:21 PM
you know, you think you're being funny, but that's a good idea

I tried, I tried. I doubt this'll work

<img src="http://www.photobucket.com/Defender/http://i167.photobucket.com/albums/u135/earling2/IMG_0037.jpg"border="0"alt=can't remember which photo">

or maybe go directly to Photobucket though you probably need my password, etc
http://s167.photobucket.com/albums/u135/earling2/

rbgarr
02-19-2007, 07:07 PM
Looks nice! Gotta feel for how much she weighs?

Mud? At Martha's Vineyard?! Surely you jest.
I heard it's all been replaced with gold dust. ;) :D

earling2
02-19-2007, 07:23 PM
ha ha ha ... that would be funny if you weren't correct. Actually, it's a kind of platinum/gold slurry, mixed with ground up SUVs that managed to rack of more than 10,000 miles (and therefore of no further possible use), overlaid with Not In My Back Yard veneer and slowly basted over the charcoal remains of unridden titanium bikes . .then, after lengthy selectman's meetings, the harbor is drained, and the mud is replaced by overeducated carpenters

So, anyway -- thanks -- the boat was about 60 lbs. bare naked, about to be flipped, and should run around 80 plus when all done. The reason the inside looks nothing like the plans is weight savings ... it's a bit of a hybrid of the plans as drawn, plus some standard glued-lap interior methods, plus my own attempts at lightness without losing stiffness. Mr. Bolger says around 90 at the low end -- and oddly, I think he might be right on the money despite my best efforts to beat that #

earling2
02-19-2007, 07:26 PM
ps, I'm not at sold on the bright finished upper two strakes inside -- just an experiment. Any opinions more than welcome. Also, you can probably see the freakiness of that yellow.
The hollowed out rail get a 3/4" manilla line set into it, a cool Bolgerism that will really be useful

StevenBauer
02-19-2007, 07:26 PM
She's a beauty:

http://i167.photobucket.com/albums/u135/earling2/IMG_0005.jpg

pipefitter
02-19-2007, 07:34 PM
The Hatteras off white from I-lux has a darker and lighter version. The darker can be made to the lighter version with 50% white added. The lighter of the 2 is on the top and bottom of my boat.The interior is the same color but with flattener added which darkens it a touch.
http://home.earthlink.net/~tigmaster41/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/img_2587ns.jpg

earling2
02-19-2007, 07:52 PM
hey, thanks, nice paint job
I never noticed that two color thing -- not a bad color but hoping to avoid Brightsides (and it's too late now -- the undercoat would at this point be Kirby's enamel over CPES instead of that rockhard Interlux stuff)
StevenBauer -- how the heck did you do that . .., by the way?

hokiefan
02-19-2007, 08:15 PM
Get a sample of the bottom mud around where you'll be launching and have it color matched at your local paint store. Then when the bottom of the boat is all muddy no one will know. :D

Steven

In the industrial world, any decent plant guy knows that tanks should be painted "overflow yellow" (or brown, or black....) :D

Bobby

almeyer
02-19-2007, 09:34 PM
I'm with Steven - I think it's beautiful like it is. And WOW! what a piece of wood on that transom!
Al

Bruce Hooke
02-19-2007, 10:33 PM
Kirby can mix custom colors, so if you find a color you like in another brand, Kirby should be able to match it if you'd prefer to use Kirby paint. I rather like something along the lines of Kirby's Salmon as an inside the boat color, but it seems like you may have something different in mind.

pipefitter
02-19-2007, 11:27 PM
Also,there is other high quality exterior alkyds that can be bought from local paint stores such as Benjamin Moore. That way you can buy any color imagineable and test it right on site. I used to get colors tinted and they would dry them so I could see the color change from wet to dry.Especially handy when matching an existing color for patch and touchups. Not saying anything bad of Kirby's as I am sure they are a high quality paint. Ben Moore is/was a favorite of boat builders here for many years. It's what the guys who I learned from always swore by.
I also wouldn't use brightside on the boat pictured. I was mainly just showing the color that was mentioned.But I have really grown to like it's stain resistance. This boat is fished heavily and it cleans up like new every trip.Is mostly why I chose the high gloss. My main concern being scum from the brackish rivers I go in occasionally. Wipes off with dish detergent.

That sure is some pretty wood pattern on that stern and some interesting grain on the other trim in the boat. Looks great. And while I am at it,I checked out the other photos and it looks like you really enjoyed building that boat,as evident in the nice scarf of the stem. Beautiful wood,beautiful work.

earling2
02-20-2007, 09:23 AM
Thanks everyone for the helpful/insightful comments . . .
Pipefitter -- yup, that's right, there's something not quite right about Brightsides here, though I thought and thought and couldn't quite figure out why. I've used tons of it, but it's stinky (I'm indoors) and it's really thin and fussy to paint (I hate it if I have to paint around anything, unless sprayed) and way too glossy (without deglosser) for this, and, finally, I'm after that softening liquid glass look you get with about two or three good coats of good marine paint (if you've ever been to Mystic and seen, say, the Alerion they have). I've used Ben Moore floor paint many many times, which gives that look (my fav., over Pratt and Lambert) but around here it's hard to get what I used to get (they push the Pratt and L.) and since I don't have a set color in mind to match . . .
(used to be a house restorer/painter) One of the big pluses for Kirby's is, they offer semi-gloss. Plus I like the label. (seriously, I'd like to laminate it into the transom)
Anyway, that Kirby's Salmon is really nice . . . I shied away initially, but this AM I may order a quart. (about 18/qt direct by phone as opposed to 32 from Jamestown Dist., by the way)
and yes, I did enjoy building it, very much. Particularly working with that Sappelle. Rings like metal but works very easily. Planking not so fun -- Okume feels cheap, though using Doug Hylan's method of making a jig for a saw followed by edge trimming router along the planking battens is AMAZING. (other boats I've used the freehand/plane method)
As for the transom -- that's Sappelle plywood. Rest of the boat is Brunzyeel Okume (a LOT lighter and a little cheaper) which doesn't look as good bright. The solid wood you mentioned is also Sappelle -- it is the most amazing looking stuff. I paid $12 b/f for the stuff (by mistake -- it was labeled 4.85) but that flame in the grain is worth it in small amounts. It's kind of a furniture-ish wood but obviously really strong. Rails are ash -- all they had in 11' lengths
Will post photos of the fully done boat ASAP
thanks all
dave

earling2
02-20-2007, 09:38 AM
just ordered a qt. of Salmon -- pretty dark but should be interesting. Outside of boat will be Kirby's Reddish, which is one of those hard to describe colors

pipefitter
02-20-2007, 01:30 PM
I like the look of old boats painted with Kirby's. The colors look like the liquid equivalent of Crayola crayons. Brightsides is thin(I actually thinned it more) but amazing how they get such color depth for so little final mil thickness of paint. I really didn't want many mils over wood surface that moves so much differently than the wood itself. I hope to maintain this coating thin over the years.

earling2
02-20-2007, 08:26 PM
I think Brightsides is great paint -- yup, amazing how intense the color and gloss retention is in such a thin coating of material. And the primer's even more amazing -- translucent.
But not for traditional stuff. I guess glued lapstrake is kind of in the grey area between traditional and not -- after all, it's plywood and it's been CPES coated, so it's not exactly cedar planking . . . But, yeah, I'm going for that melted glass/liquid crayola look. Anyway, as far as painting goes, marine enamel is a pretty good time . . .

StevenBauer
02-20-2007, 11:54 PM
Dave, posting pictures from photobucket is espcially easy. From the thumnail page you listed first click on the picture you want to post, that brings up a larger version. Over on the right side of the page are three headings, each with some code after it. They are URL link, HTML tag and IMG code. You want to click the last one IMG code. You don't have to right click and copy it, just a regular left click. Then go to your post and in the body of the post just right click, then Paste the code in. If you don't see the cut, paste, copy drop down menu when you right click you can switch the editor mode by clicking on the square symbol with the a/A on it. Then you can paste.

Now that that's clear as mud (which color mud?) here's your stem scarph:

http://i167.photobucket.com/albums/u135/earling2/IMG_0037.jpg

Steven

pipefitter
02-21-2007, 01:52 AM
I think Brightsides is great paint -- yup, amazing how intense the color and gloss retention is in such a thin coating of material. And the primer's even more amazing -- translucent.
But not for traditional stuff. I guess glued lapstrake is kind of in the grey area between traditional and not -- after all, it's plywood and it's been CPES coated, so it's not exactly cedar planking . . . But, yeah, I'm going for that melted glass/liquid crayola look. Anyway, as far as painting goes, marine enamel is a pretty good time . . .

I agree with your choice. It's a beautiful boat and deserves a traditional coating. I love painting with high grade oils as well. I actually used semi gloss marine enamel for the interior trim.

As far as glued lap being a grey area,the traditional brush strokes should make it look right.Seems to be the best of both worlds from where I am sitting.I doubt any reasonable person can find anything grey about your project.

As for my color analogy to crayola,it was just an off way to describe familiar colors,not the material itself. I didn't mean anything facetious by it.I am sure it will be beautiful with what you choose.

earling2
02-21-2007, 08:53 AM
pipefitter--
hey, I liked the crayolas analogy -- didn't think it was facetious at all. And thanks for posting that -- it's kind of cool to see it on the Big Screen like that. And the Forum directions were the ones that were clear as mud-- yours make sense, even I could probably do that.
I'm getting pretty excited to get that Kirby's on the inside .... I'll have a couple of shots of the boat outside on a bank of snow before long, if I'm quick about it (thought it's over 32 today). Sail rig comes next, hoping to hear from Dabbler Sails with a quote -- I'd sew it myself but time is starting to run out on the Defender project

pipefitter
02-22-2007, 02:17 AM
I work in the marine industry and my humble boat was amongst a dozen or so new fibresnawt boats at any given time for approximately 2 months while I built the furniture and did all the wiring/outboard etc. Nobody could believe my boat was painted with a brush and modified alkyd. I found ear and cheek prints on the side where they were glancing down the glare looking for telltale brushings. I often took insult for some on here saying glossy boats looking like fibresnawt etc. After doing several side by sides,I think it can be said much to the opposite effect. Plastic boats trying to look like a well faired woodie. They don't even come close. It takes a bit of guts to paint a handbuilt glossy. It hides no sins.

boylesboats
02-22-2007, 03:32 AM
I work in the marine industry and my humble boat was amongst a dozen or so new fibresnawt boats at any given time for approximately 2 months while I built the furniture and did all the wiring/outboard etc. Nobody could believe my boat was painted with a brush and modified alkyd. I found ear and cheek prints on the side where they were glancing down the glare looking for telltale brushings. I often took insult for some on here saying glossy boats looking like fibresnawt etc. After doing several side by sides,I think it can be said much to the opposite effect. Plastic boats trying to look like a well faired woodie. They don't even come close. It takes a bit of guts to paint a handbuilt glossy. It hides no sins.

Sign of great craftsmanship... I seen a lot wood beauties look amazing..
Unlike flubberglass, it can get rough as the gelcoat fade or wear through....

earling2
02-22-2007, 07:26 PM
what did you use on your boat?
I painted a 25 footer (new construction) with Interlux in 1988 or so-- plain old $12/qt. enamel-- rolled and tipped. It looked pretty glassy, too. The paint lasted at least 6 years without fading or problems (WEST system substrate)
I know of a synthetic thinner by Pratt & Lambert that will pretty much eliminate brush marks. Just wondering what you used.

pipefitter
02-22-2007, 08:47 PM
Thanks Boyles and there is some amazing boats in amongst this WBF that put mine to shame but I think it's a contender in average public eye.


what did you use on your boat?
I painted a 25 footer (new construction) with Interlux in 1988 or so-- plain old $12/qt. enamel-- rolled and tipped. It looked pretty glassy, too. The paint lasted at least 6 years without fading or problems (WEST system substrate)
I know of a synthetic thinner by Pratt & Lambert that will pretty much eliminate brush marks. Just wondering what you used.

Earling: I used Brightside by Interlux. The thinner I used was an old sauce used by the old varnish and enamel pros which consisted of VM&P Naptha,kerosene,mineral spirits. Mineral spirits for the base,kerosene to reduce brush drag and the naptha to hold the sags back or some flash and to help cool the mix. 85% spirits,10%kero,5% naptha. I also use it as a final brush rinse as a conditioner of sorts between uses until storage cleaning where I actually use laundry detergent with a touch of fabric softener. Brushes are Badger for the slick stuff and Purdy's for the enamel.

Thinner to paint ratio is an average 10% in above 80 deg temps.Above say 82deg,painting is sweat intensive and not so enjoyable. I worked 2 brushes and a roller in hand and a worn 2" Purdy sash on the side. 1" camel artists brush to kill the roller edges on the radiuses,3" full badger for utility tipping of the flat areas. 2" sash tool for the plank reveals. I really enjoy painting with oils.Almost can't wait to do it again.

I know some don't like to put epoxy over wood but I think that one really cant have a better primer/sanding sealer. Paint will last nearly 2 to 1 over epoxy.

earling2
02-23-2007, 10:00 PM
wow, that's some kind of sauce. I'll have to try it one day. I agree --painting with oil is ok -- do your prep to perfection, get your ducks in a row, it's very satisying. I'm super sensitive to solvents though, so I sort of avoid it as a general rule. that's quite a quiver of brushes, you're an aficiando of brushes. I used to dearly love Magicoaters (no longer made) 2 1/2 china bristle brushes with round handles so your hands didn't cramp during long cutting in jobs and you could spin them out without a spinner. They had long flexible bristles and you could cut a perfect edge and also lay on just the right film thickness ...
I just got an Epiphanes oval brush for varnish that's actually pretty good. Still haven't gotten so I can lay on Epiphanes without sags every time -- just can't get the hang of it--thinner, no thinner, dryer, penetrol .. humid, dry, cold, warm, hot ... almost every time, somewhere there's a freakin' drip or a sag . . . and I painted professionally for a long time. Only varnish gives me this problem.

Jeb Fowler
02-24-2007, 12:36 AM
I mixed a kind of salmon buff from assorted kirby's colors for my Gartside powerboat. Here is the link to some photos: http://www.kodakgallery.com/BrowsePhotos.jsp?UAUTOLOGIN_ID=69189949610&collid=69189949610.85692947910.1172293183873&page=1

People tell me it looks like a Mexican restaurant but I think once it is contrasted with tan decks and bluish grey floor boards, it will look great. I think that Bristol Beige is too white. On two boats I have built, it ends up looking like white when you're out in the sun.

-Jeb Fowler
Austin, Texas

pipefitter
02-24-2007, 01:42 AM
I was concerned with glare(weldor eyes) and everytime I step into a white boat at work,I can't for the life of me figure out how anyone can fish all day in that in summer.Sunburn from above and below.I would have to have a 200.00 pair of sunglasses for 100.00 worth of paint.The Hatteras off white is Florida friendly and hides the sand colored dust well.

I don't know how secret the sauce is since it's an eyeball mix pretty much.I worked mostly with elder painters which is probably a good thing.I don't recall them being much sensitive to solvents being there was another "special sauce" they poured inside themselves frequently.

I actually kinda like the yellow in your boat,Earling2.

Jeb,I couldn't access the pics on your site .

Barrett Faneuf
02-24-2007, 05:11 AM
I just had Kirby's mix me up some Hatteras off-white for the exterior, and Bristol Beige for the decks and interior. Eggshell, not gloss.

I love it. It really, really works for me on the interior. Light and cheerful without being overwhelmingly buttery.

Representative picture of the Bristol Beige. The Coaming is in Hatteras off-white. Really tricky to get color matching with differing light conditions and digital camera:

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid209/p88264ba49725c67176d5adbd9ff1ca2c/ee399b86.jpg

earling2
02-24-2007, 04:41 PM
the inside of the Defender is more or less done -- I like the Salmon inside OK, not nuts about it. The Cream (yellow) would have been ok, though it would have been retained a lot of dirt on the strakes. The Salmon takes a lot of the contrasts away-- looks worse in pictures, better (I think) in real life. It's nearly the same color as the varnish but I think in outdoor light it's gonna be pretty nice. Will post pictures when I get done with the outside.
In case anybody's interested, the boat's 75 lbs. according the bathroom scale. I'm pretty pleased with that since I wasted a lot of time trying to figure out ways to lighten the boat -- now I can horse it up on my back and walk over the sand easily.
Yeah, pipefitter, I hear you. Years ago I used to know an old painter who painted all day (oil) with a cigar in his mouth. Indoors. I think he inoculated himself against solvents in the bars at night, too.

earling2
02-24-2007, 05:04 PM
jeb,
same here, couldn't get to your pics . .

pipefitter
02-24-2007, 10:48 PM
Earling2: Not sure if this might help but i kind of went thru a similar ordeal when imagining colors off the boat. I found that after painting the outside,I was able to better visualize a color kit that worked. I actually started with a blue tinted interior color to stay in scheme with the exterior. Or the interior color tinted from the exterior color.I was sure this was to be a safe bet because it is part of something already on the boat and predictable which = safe.But where that led me was to white and grey. Universally predictable boat(wise) colors.But had I not painted the hull exterior first,I would have nothing to compare it to. To walk up on my blue boat and then look over the side,I could imagine or picture the transition colors almost instantly without surprise or 2nd guessing myself.Only reaon I mention this is because you state that (or I get the feeling that) you are seemingly undecided or unsure. This is the first thing I have ever built ,where I didnt care what others thought.

earling2
02-25-2007, 08:37 AM
Pipefitter-
good to hear I'm not the only one who goes through this process...
yeah, I'm definitely unsure, but I waiting until the outside is painted and maybe that'll work with the inside. I'm no stranger to this process -- I don't think I've ever built anything without agonizing over the colors. I have a few artist friends who can visualize, with total certainty, exactly what color works with what, and then pick out a chip that matches what they imagine. Also, you may have noticed, most women are amazingly good at picking colors. God forgot to give me that talent. I have the worst-case-scenario -- I can imagine what I want, no problem -- but it never exists on any color chip known to man, and I have no clue as to how to obtain it . . . .
oh the humanity.
Another problem, paint companies have made their colors generic -- Interlux (I think) used to have Sea Foam green, a great color. I think they phased it out. Most stock colors are heinous -- funny, what you say -- the "right" colors are almost always totally predictably traditional. Does anybody make a good Buff? Interlux has Sundown Buff, which is really dark, much darker than trad. buff , and it's Brightsides, which is expensive and virtually impossible to paint normally with .. .
etc.

earling2
02-25-2007, 08:49 AM
Pettit Shipendec sounds like it has a lot of pretty nice colors, but I can't find an on-line chart anywhere, just Easypoxy, which seems to mimic most of the other totally generic charts out there

pipefitter
02-25-2007, 11:16 AM
Careful of online color swatches. I used Jamestown Distr. online chart and didn't see the tiny print that says something to the effect of (for accurate color selection,refer to catalog). Day and night difference. Maybe they have improved this or maybe it wasn't an issue with pettit.

earling2
02-25-2007, 07:12 PM
It's definitely an issue -- you can't use your computer but you can get a sense . .

pipefitter
02-25-2007, 09:37 PM
The blue that's on my boat,I had to add 80% white to get it to that shade. And that's what was closer to "Largo Blue" in shade by the online chip. The real Largo blue in the can is closer to a royal blue and i thought I was getting a lightish blue/green Like the color of the water over in Largo against the white sand bottom at high noon...in summer. I was going to add a drop or 2 of green to it but I ended up liking the light blue so I left it. Maybe next go around.

Jeb Fowler
02-25-2007, 10:59 PM
Yeah, sorry about the bum link. I'll get the photos on an easier site once I have access to the computer that they are saved on (maybe tomorrow). Thanks for your interest. Another trick I've noticed is to contrast an offwhite like hatteras or bristol with a pure white trim. It makes the offwhite colors look like they have more color than they would on their own while still keeping everything light and relatively cool (temp).

-Jeb

Jeb Fowler
02-27-2007, 12:03 AM
Here's an operational link to the boat I'm building and the interior color I mixed from Kirby's paints. Just the design of the can jacket is reason enough to buy the stuff:

http://www.imagestation.com/album/pictures.html?id=2095202490



-Jeb Fowler
Austin, Texas

earling2
02-27-2007, 04:54 PM
That's a really cool boat. And nice job you're doing. Where'd you get the yellow pine?
agreed about the Kirby's label. (see comments near the beginning of this thread . . .)
What kind of power goes into that boat?

earling2
02-27-2007, 04:55 PM
ps, what colors did you mix to get that pinkish buff?

Jeb Fowler
02-27-2007, 08:23 PM
I mixed some combination of "rose pink," "shaw's yellow," "cream," "white," and "taupe." Don't think I could recreate it. If I need to match, I'll just send a swatch to Kirby's.

The longleaf is from a local company that specializes in restoration work on Texas court houses and the like. The material comes out of massive cotton gin beams. The whole south was built out of longleaf until the sixtees. It's good stuff but VERY difficult to finish well. The more you sand it, the worse it looks due to density disparities between early and late wood; never mind the sap/rosin that clogs your paper. The trick seems to be to sand it only to 60 grit and then smooth down many coats of primer. It should resist rot well and its very, very stable.

-Jeb

Jeb Fowler
02-27-2007, 08:37 PM
Oh, yes and I'm installing a Sabb G with variable pitch propeller that I bought for a song about five years ago. That was the sign that the boat needed to be built. The engine is a real aesthetic experience. I'll post a pic of it when I get a chance. I'm still figuring out the best way to engineer a hand wheel for the pitch control that will allow me to still articulate the control that sits on the engine so that it can be driven from two stations. Any remote control geniuses out there? I think I'm going with a teleflex steering system that doesn't utilize the "no-feedback" option. Perhaps I'll pose this question as a new string as well.

earling2
02-28-2007, 09:03 AM
I see a lot of Saab diesel mentions in Classic Boat -- always with this nostalgiac reverance. I'm pretty interested in them. Isn't that a pretty low power unit though for a good size fishing boat? They're pretty scarce in the US.
They look like old single cyl. volvos, don't they? (which purportedly rattle the fastenings out of the boat)

I feel your pain r.e. the yellow pine. I wonder if it would be any better of it had been quarter-sawn?
I built a 25' sharpiet out of Doug. fir plywood a long time ago and discovered the early/late wood dilemma, too. Also, at that time there were no electric random orbitals . .. Anyhow, three coats of WEST and about 20 hours with a Makita buzzer . . .
nice project, yeah, sounds like a new thread trying to be born ...

Jeb Fowler
02-28-2007, 09:31 AM
Yes, its very similar to the volvo MD1 but larger displacement and better vibration dampeners (additional, weighted flywheels that turn opposite the piston). The variable pitch is the really fun part. It makes powerboating a bit more like sailing as you tune in the ratio of rpm and pitch. My floorboards are out of ipe and I'm concerned that they will ring like xylophones with that engine. I've thought about putting thin rubber or innertube between them and the floors to isolate vibration.

Jeb Fowler
02-28-2007, 09:36 AM
regarding hp, the sabb is rated at 10hp but this is the propeller hp rather than brake hp. It is the equivalent of a 20hp kubota or yanmar (which is what was called for in this boat). It should be perfect for an LWL of 20' and displacement of 3500 lbs. Also, the variable pitch gives you an infinite range of "gears" to deal with towing or headwinds; or carp the size of volkswagons.

earling2
02-28-2007, 03:18 PM
Yes-- love that hard hard wood. Ipe is one of the hardest I've ever tried to mill or plane ... did you get it straight from the lumberyard? I put some Sappelle in this Defender of mine and as I said earlier, it rang like a bell when it knocked against something. But easy to work. Ipe grain switches direction and color about every three inches.
That sounds like a pretty nice propulsion unit. Counterrotating flywheels -- that's like something out of a japanese one-banger 4-stroke motorcycle engine. I imagine the prop. comes with the engine? You should be able to set the revs at, like, 1800, and then slowly increase the pitch until the boat stops going faster and the engine starts to labor, then back off a hair
pretty cool. Robb White might have written something on something like that -- if he didn't before he passed on.
When's it going in the water?

Wes White
02-28-2007, 06:29 PM
Jeb,
Try hitting that longleaf with a good cabinet scraper. I think you will be pleased.

Jeb Fowler
02-28-2007, 11:44 PM
I'll give that a try, Wes. Too often I go straight for the sand paper. I've put sealer and primer on the hull but this could help telll me where the low spots are. I'll hold you totally responsible for screwing up my hull if it doesn't work:).

-Jeb